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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone!

My boy, Koa, just turned 9 months old and a problem has started that I cant seem to stop...

I taught him bite inhibition from an early age, but recently he is biting hands or arms and will grab onto a person's clothes or nip at legs.

Triggers:

  • When its morning, he will follow me around the whole time I am getting ready for work, sometimes with a toy in his mouth and sometimes without. He will jump up on me and nip at my clothes. I can stand still and tell him to "calm" but as soon as I move he is back on me. Or he has a toy in his mouth and will literally, not even joking, come up behind me and nip me in the butt!!! Then proceed to jump and nip on my hands. Yes, I know this is a sign that he wants to play. The issue is how he is going about it.
  • Let me prelude this one by saying, HE LOVES TO PLAY TUG! Even with balls... He loves to fetch the ball but he wont drop it or leave it although he does know the "leave it" command when he goes for something he's not supposed to go for and hes pretty good with that. With his toys and especially balls... Not good at all. So, while playing tug (ropes, stuffed toys, etc) he will play with me but will try to bite where my hands are on the toy. He has bitten me pretty good a couple times. It's like he doesnt understand not to bite my hands or not so hard. With playing fetch, like i said, he will not drop the ball and I ask him to leave it and he wont. I go to take it from him and he will try to bite my hands and wants to play tug with the ball, which I wont allow. also when he returns the ball he throws himself at me and jumps with ful body weight that I can actually be knocked over if I dont see him coming.
  • He will also have a toy in his mouth when I am home at night and he will nip at my hands with it. and has bitten me too a few times like this pretty good on the hand or arm. I know this is a sign he wants to play but not the behavior I want when he wants this.
  • Last, I will let him jump on me when I come home and "hug" me, but sometimes when I start petting him he will bite my hands and my arm. He will jump off me with my arm still in his mouth! He has left bruises on my arm from biting my arms like chew toys and me trying to get away from him.
  • Also, he does all of this with my father too, who actually likes to play rough with him. He will jump on my mother and she freaks out, but he thinks her freaking out is "play" and does it more.

Things I have tried:
  • First, I tell him "NO BITE" and take him by the collar and put him in his kennel for about min. When I come back and let him out, he still repeats the same behaviors.
  • I will tell him "NO BITE" and give him a light tap on the nose or wrap my fingers around his lower jaw so he cant bite me (not hard, people! I dont ever hurt him or hit him EVER!) But he thinks this is play too and just gets more agressive with it. So that doesnt work either
  • I have tried the squirt bottle, but he loves water to all extents so he thinks that he is just getting a drink or its play. Behavior still continues.
  • I stop playing with him and ignore him when he bites with the toy. But he doesnt seem to care. He will either bite at my hands to continue playing or if I get up on the bed (which he hasnt figured how to get on yet because he doesnt realize he has backlegs lol) he will continue playing with the toy by himself. Growling and throwing it around and whipping his head back and forth with it like it is evil and he needs to destroy it. He doesnt care I stopped playing.

Other info you need to know:
  • I got him at 8 weeks old from a reputiable breeder and comes from a line of champions.
  • He has been to obidience school and passed his AKC puppy test at almost 5 months old. He has had training from me and we train a few times a week.
  • I work during the day so my mother takes care of him. I dont think she exercises him during the day but she always says he's so relaxed during the day and doesnt jump on her. Only when I am around.
  • YES, he gets exercise. If I get home late, I play tug (or try to with him biting) until he is disinterested, panting extremely and goes and lays down.
  • Or if I get home early he goes for a two mile walk with me on a no pull lead because he will literally drag me down the road if I didnt have it. Then we play fetch or at least try to when he actually wants to leave the ball. But he is very possessive over it so even if I reach for it he will go for it or try to bite my hand. Maybe he needs more exercise? Maybe he doesnt? But I give it my best to tire him out and he sleeps from 10pm to 6am every night because he is tired.
  • He is 9 months old and NOT nuetered. I am up in the air about getting him nuetered at this time. But maybe if I do, he will calm down???
  • He does not have any food aggression, I can put my hand in his dish or take it away and he doesnt bite or bark or growel. I can take his treats away and he is still fine. He doesnt beg at the table.
  • There was one scary incident with him when I had him out in the snow. He got so crazy and was running around like a mad man and then came back to me and was biting my legs and hands and arms and coat and he wouldnt stop. He finally had me up agaisnt a tree and I let him off the leash and threw a stick near-by and he finally stopped. It was not the dog I knew and raised. It was like he was a completely different dog when this happened.
  • When he is overexcited he jumps. But with strangers he just brings them a toy or keeps a toy in his mouth and goes in circles around them. Doesnt really jump on them at all. Just general golden excitement to see a new person.

IF ANYONE HAS BEEN THROUGH THIS OR CAN HELP ME, PLEASE ANSWER! I am exhausted of it. I cant make him stop and its getting out of hand. If anyone has any other questions, please ask!!!! I really want to solve this and I feel like I am at such a loss. I feel like a bad dog mommy. :crying:

Also, he is my first golden. I am an animal person and have researched the breed endlessly. I know they are mouthy and he may never stop biting, but ITS THE DEGREE OF BITING. He has to stop hurting me and others who he plays with.
 

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Puddles
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I'm so sorry you are having problems. Sounds like you need to sign up for a good training class at a GOOD facility not a petsmart/petco type training. They can help you learn how to handle your issues and teach you how to gain your pups respect. Hope it works out soon!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm so sorry you are having problems. Sounds like you need to sign up for a good training class at a GOOD facility not a petsmart/petco type training. They can help you learn how to handle your issues and teach you how to gain your pups respect. Hope it works out soon!
Thanks! He did go to Puppy Class at a great training facility and is an AKC Star Puppy. So it's not like he ever went to a bad class. Its like he forgot everything he learned. Or likes to play dumb. Could be his hormones since he's not neutered. :frown2:

But thanks!
 

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this won't be popular with some here, but when I have a problem with a puppy biting, I place my thumb in their mouth and push down on either their tongue or the roof of their mouth until they back off. Do it every single time they bite, and soon they won't want to bite anymore.

I would stop testing taking the food away or putting your hand in the bowl. That's great he isn't food aggressive. Don't create a problem where there isn't one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
this won't be popular with some here, but when I have a problem with a puppy biting, I place my thumb in their mouth and push down on either their tongue or the roof of their mouth until they back off. Do it every single time they bite, and soon they won't want to bite anymore.

I would stop testing taking the food away or putting your hand in the bowl. That's great he isn't food aggressive. Don't create a problem where there isn't one.
I LOVE your honesty. Some people freak out if you even LOOK at your dog the wrong way. Yes he is my baby, but he is also an animal. And he needs to learn not to bite people. With that said I am going to try that!!!! I will let you know how it works!
 

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Puppy classes are very different than obedience classes for his age. It's a class that will teach you how to positively handle his adolescent behavior. It's more about you than the dog. A 6 week class will do wonders, not just for this dog but for any future dogs you may own in your lifetime. Your dog and you are not speaking the same language, your body language is telling him "let's play". A good obedience class will help you learn better body language so he understands what you want from him and how to set boundaries with him.

While I'm all for corrections when done correctly the idea of teaching him to avoid pain isn't actually teaching him what you want him to do and can create bigger problems down the road. Take a class... we can all learn something new.
 

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Puppy classes are very different than obedience classes for his age. It's a class that will teach you how to positively handle his adolescent behavior. It's more about you than the dog. A 6 week class will do wonders, not just for this dog but for any future dogs you may own in your lifetime. (...) A good obedience class will help you learn better body language so he understands what you want from him and how to set boundaries with him.
This.

The fact that the dog is doing this with you but not with your mom suggests that YOU need to do something different in order to stop the behaviour. This isn't just a dog problem - it's a dog-human interaction problem. A good training school doesn't train dogs, it trains humans how to train dogs. Once you realize this and enroll in a good, basic obedience class, it will do amazing things for your relationship with your dog.

One thing I'd suggest right now is to stop all "rough-play" with the dog. Not just with you, but with all humans. Part of the problem is that the dog is in charge here. He's initiating the type of game he wants to play, and he's not stopping until he feels like stopping. From now on, games should be started by you and stopped by you. Try playing lower-key games that make the dog think. Hide stuff and teach him to find it. Teach him tricks (spin, bow, roll over, play dead, high five, etc.) and ask him to perform them in exchange for rewards. Give him jobs to do in the house: fetching stuff, etc. Goldens are intelligent dogs that actually need to use their brains in order to function well.

You describe him as a "star puppy" but if I've understood your post, the only formal training you've had with him is a puppy class. This just isn't enough when you have a dog like a golden retriever. Dog training is a lifetime thing. It's not that he's forgotten what he learned - it's that, in a six-week class, you didn't learn enough to keep him in practice. You have to keep at it. My dog is 14 months old now - he's from working lines and is a high energy, intelligent dog - and we still take class twice a week (obedience and agility). We're learning to be a team and to work together. My daughter is 15; she and her dog (a poodle) have been taking weekly classes for the last 6+ years. They're awesome together now - because they've worked at it. Training, especially with a big, energetic dog like a golden retriever, isn't optional. You have to do it, not just for the dog, but for you to learn how to deal with the dog.

Neutering will have no effect whatsoever on this type of behaviour. He's being a brat because he's in charge. Neutering him will simply turn him into a neutered brat.

Best of luck. Once you have this figured out, you'll be surprised at how quickly the behaviour will change.
 

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Koa, sounds a lot like my guy Axl when he was a pup. He would absolutely MAUL my wife and daughters - jumping up and biting them to the point where my wife's co-workers were convinced she was being abused! Technically she was but by an adolescent GR.

The way I finally fixed the situation and turned him into a once in a lifetime dog was to methodically tire him to the point of near exhaustion with intense exercise every single day. A dog that tired only wants to eat and go to sleep.
 

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I'm experiencing some of that too, with my soon to be 8 month old pup. I've been fairly permissive with him and so far, he's been pretty ok with it. Lately though his nipping biting and humping have gotten a bit more serious. Thus far I have been able to talk him out of it and "no bite" seems to have some effect, but he's no angel.

Whether it's pain or withholding reward or putting him in timeout, there's no way to "reach" him without letting him know that the behavior is unwelcome. That's the key point. As they enter sexual maturity they tend to test the waters more and try to express dominance. Training and pup-tiredness are your friends.
 

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Koa,

The un-sugarcoated answer is ......... this is a problem you created.

Puppies do not come from the womb pre-trained. They have to be taught the behaviors you want and what behaviors you do not want. This requires you to be a leader and do that teaching, in a manner that your puppy understands. Obviously at this point you're getting the message from the pup in no uncertain terms that he doesn't understand what your rules are, and what is expected from him.


Simply ignoring a undesirable behavior and hoping it goes away isn't going to make it happen. You are going to have to take steps to address the issues, rather sooner than later, to prevent the problems getting even worse.

Find a real dog training facility in your area. One that is attended by people who regularly compete with their dogs. These folks will have a much wider understanding of training and will be able to adapt the training approach to the dog at the end of your leash. They will also be able to help you understand how and why things work, where you went wrong in your attempts thus far, and how to get onto the right track as quickly as possible.

Hint....
Talk to people in your area that successfully compete in Obedience, Agility and Field, and ask them which training centers they would recommend.
 

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You have received a great deal of good advice and I would also encourage you to find a first rate training facility for your dog and yourself. If you have trouble finding one contact the local GRCA in your area for recommendations for a facility or a trainer. As AlphaDude suggested a tired puppy is a good puppy. Lots of exercise is good. Not just a walk but something which allows Koa to become tired. Puppies (even 9 month old ones) have a lot of energy they need to burn off. The other thing I would strongly suggest is that you cease to play the "tug" game with your puppy. It is part of what is causing your problems. You have said that you dog is jumping on you and pulling at your clothing. You have played tug with him and taught him that pulling at things is appropriate behavior and yet when he pulls on your clothing it is no longer appropriate. You have given him mixed signals regarding this by allowing him to play tug with you. Stop playing tug.
Unfortunately our dogs do not generally arrive in our homes fully trained. The training and teaching of what is and is not appropriate behavior is up to us as their owners. Appropriate behavior is taught with consistency and patience. For example, if it is not ok for Koa to jump up on you that means it is NEVER ok for Koa to jump up on you. You cannot allow it is some instances and and then say it is not ok in other situations. You have to be consistent.
Eventually I believe you can resolve these issues with Koa but it will take time and you will need assistance from a good trainer. Please let us know how it is going. Best wishes:)
 

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Well... if it makes you feel better, you haven't tried everything! You need to go back to the basics. Prevent, manage, and redirect by telling him what he should do.

(1) When you are getting ready for work, have an activity for him, like a stuffed Kong or a chew. Something to keep him occupied that isn't you. Or have some treats stashed around and make him work for them as you get ready. But I wouldn't make it all about being calm-- throw some more active type things for him to do.

(2) Teach him tug with rules. You need treats for this. I wrote a post about how to do it (click on my name for past posts) but I'm sure there are a million ways to do it. Then ONLY play tug with those rules. If he stops playing by the rules, game over for a little-- come back to it and see if he can try again. If not, take a break.

(3) As soon as he bites you need to get away where you can actually get away and not give him one bit of attention.

(4) When you see a pattern of "he doesn't know what to do except bite me/he wants to interact" then schedule activities (like more Kongs and chews) so what he's doing is on YOUR terms.
 

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I was in the same boat with Bailey a few months ago. You can search my posts and find some great advice I received. But honestly, learning her thresholds, separating myself from her (i.e., have my husband lock her in living room behind the gate when I got home so she couldn't run to the door. She had to wait quietly until I came to her, with treats, and worked a bit) and finding a good trainer. Bailey had two "puppy" classes but I was shocked at how different "beginner obedience" is, even though the list of objectives are very similar, the focus is on how YOU interact with the dog. We just finished a 6 week beginner obedience class that cost $125 and that was a steal. The lessons I learned were invaluable. Bailey just enjoyed the classes LOL. An awesome trainer can identify the smallest things that make the biggest difference. For example, when I would give Bailey her marker word "yes" I would give her the treat as directed. The trainer noticed I would reach out to Bailey with the treat. Now I have learned to keep my posture, my hand down at my side, and take a step back when I give the marker word and treat - Bailey has to fully turn and come TO me for the treat. I know that sounds basic but it's been a life changer. The trainer also noticed Bailey twitches her nose and her right ear just before she "springs" into action/excitement. I can't see it. She even filmed Bailey and played it back in slow-motion so I could see it, but in real-time I will miss it. She's that good, and those trainers when found are invaluable.
 

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I feel for you, your pup is at the terrible teenage stage, but biting has to stop and quickly. You have recieved some good advice from competent people. I hope that you took notice of the advice that neutering will not help and would be bad healthwise at least till he is full grown. Training and a lot of calmer exercise seems to be the most important. Here where I am living there are no dog training possibilities so I have done my best on my own. Henry was a land shark and a bratty teenager, this forum helped me so much. Any unwlecome behaviour got Henry times out. I only played tug for a short while, it does seem to highten the excitement. I do a lot of ball throwing, Henry will bring it back but will also not give it up, but when working on trade I found out that he will trade the ball even for low value treats, so that it was we do. He brings the ball back, gets the command "sit" and then I put my hand out palm up and he drops it into my hand and gets the treat. I taught him to give a paw in 2 evenings, he is so quick to learn. I also try to teach him some self control by having him sit and having a treat on the palm of my hand and telling him to wait, then after a few seconds I say go and he takes the treat. There are all sorts of calmer more controlled games which make their brains work. That is one side of it and then a lot of exercise, is there anywhere near you, where he can safely run free. I go to the beach at least once a day. I do hope that you can get help, as it really does get better, my boy is nearly 4 now and the darling of everyone we meet.
 

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Wow he sounds EXACTLY like my 1 year old, who was just like that at 9 months and still is a little like that. I'm still learning about his triggers and watching him carefully, we train every day and we are trying to be really structured. Things that work for me are:

Putting him away immediately, he goes to a quiet place and he relaxes, away from me. I feel that he gets super excited with me because I'm the person he wants to play the most and he watches me the most. So if he's not being nice to me, he doesn't get to see me. I would do it longer than 1 min, until he can calm down. If he doesn't see you he will eventually calm down and go rest. Then when he's being a great dog he can come and sit with me or he can play with me. If he whines or barks I would ignore him - he is being demanding and I don't like that.

He also follows me when I get ready for work, this is new behavior and he didn't used to do that. I think he understands that I'm leaving soon and he gets stressed. So I put him in the quiet place before he can do any of that following me around, because I know it will lead to the jump and bite soon. When I'm sure I can leave in 1 min, I let him out and I show him to the room I've hidden treats in and I place two kongs on the floor. Then he ignored me when I left.

Yelping works when we're playing tug or ball and he accidentally bit me, I drop the toy and yelp. This works for me because he doesn't want the toy, he just wants to play with me, so I take away what he wants by stopping play. If he looks like he's getting too excited about play, no more play. Maybe train with food, or maybe just go to his quiet area.

When he's over excited, yelping doesn't work, and Hitting his nose doesn't work I tried, but I suspect only if I hit really hard would he back off and I can't do that. The best is to put his leash on immediately and lead him to the quiet place. This required that I keep his leash on me every where I go in the house, but this did wonders for me. We stopped getting into situations of jump and bite and I manage to put him away before the biting starts. Also I'm not sure how he reacted to you taking him by the collar, but when I did that, he turned around to try to bite my hand, so leash was better.

I have done the put my hand at the back of his throat when he bites me. It's only when there's nothing around to stop him, no treats on me, no leash etc. Very uncomfortable for him but in his agitation he will bite again once I take my hand out. I repeat until he can get it into his stubborn head to no bite. My dog is quite stubborn, so we did this 3 or 4 times before he stopped. The moment he stopped I tried distraction and I told him excitedly 'Cedar look!! Look what's there!!!', amazingly it worked. He then forgot about his agitation and we went home. If he's biting and you have a toy near you, I would stuff it into his mouth to see whether he wants to bite anything, or he actually wants to bite you. When he wants to bite me, its usually more about frustration. I feel like there's no direct cure for frustration, he just has to learn that he won't always get what he wants and we do 'patience training' by making him wait for the things he wants. Wanna go for a walk, wait at the door sitting nicely. Wanna have dinner, wait till I say ok. Wanna play ball, wait in drop position for 2 min! Start barking at me, and I put the toys away, no more play or no more walk or no more dinner, then try again in 5min.

He got excited when he saw a big puddle of water outside, he loves water, yep he jumped and he ran heaps and was so out of control. I held my halti leash close so stopped the running, and then distraction or give commands. If he is outside and leashed and jumping and biting at me, i would probably put my hand at the back of his throat, other people have said to step on the leash so he can't jump but I feel it increases his frustration.

He also loves playing tug, but there was a time I stopped all tug, because it led to too much excitement. I focused on teaching 'give', swopping with a treat, with less valuable toys. I used to be really structured with him with the puppy biting, then I relaxed when he got good then he's now a bratty teenager and so we are going back to all the structure like before. He would get his dinner on a walk, every few steps I recall him and he can get some food. We do sit, drops and 2 min timed stays, and he earns his dinner by doing them. If he can't play nicely then all the interaction is training and all other time is quiet time by himself.

I wouldn't tolerate that jumping on me, for the reason that I'm pretty small and I would fall over. Jumping on me = go to your quiet place and no more play. I used to get annoyed and yell at him for jumping, yelling makes him agitated, so I try not to yell now and quickly put his leash on and out of my room.

I can see that he gets over excited pretty easily, and gets frustrated easily. Overexcited biting is different to frustrated biting. My best strategy was to do more other training. he can already sit, then keep asking him to sit every half hour until he can do it any time, keep doing it randomly on walks. Sit before you leave the house, sit while I shut the door, sit before dinner is served, sit before we start playing, sit at the traffic light. So that maybe when he's all mad running around the house and you say sit, he might actually sit by instinct.

When Cedar is at home, he is always doing something, chewing his toys or checking out strange noises at the window, some times he lies down and goes to sleep, not too often. This is after 2 x 1 hour walks every day, and 15min training for dinner. Apparently this is all not enough, he can have more. On the weekend, we could go for an outing that is 2 hours and that would keep him calm and sleepy all day. So I agree with everyone recommending lots of exercise. A different walking route also tires him out more than the usual route. Sometimes we walk a bit and run a bit too.

If he already knows the usual tricks, sit, drop, stay, wait, leave it, shake hands, then keep doing it all the time. I realised that although I taught him to 'turn around' quite early, after some time he forgot it and would only do a half turn. I would also teach him new tricks, I used to have a new trick for him to learn every other week, then I got lazy. Now that he's so bratty, he's just always going to be learning a new trick, this week its walking backwards, the next one is to balance a ball on his nose.
 

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(2) Teach him tug with rules. You need treats for this. I wrote a post about how to do it (click on my name for past posts) but I'm sure there are a million ways to do it. Then ONLY play tug with those rules. If he stops playing by the rules, game over for a little-- come back to it and see if he can try again. If not, take a break.


Hi Anele. I'm somewhat technologically illiterate. I have gone to your name and I can't seem to find the "Tug with Rules." Is there a particular topic it was posted under?

I'd be interested in seeing that game! I can't imagine not playing tug with my pup, but I also don't want to be raising a problem dog. We need those rules!

Thanks in advance. You provide some great advice to folks on here. I always enjoy reading.

Rhonda
 

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Rhonda here is Anele's post on Teaching Tug With Rules

Old 12-22-2015, 11:20 AM #15 (permalink)
Anele


Just checking in to say-- if you have a dog with this issue, teach your dog tug with rules. Make sure to practice, practice, practice in an environment with low or few distractions so that it becomes automatic.

For me, tug has made all the difference on walks. We took a long (for him) walk yesterday, and there are certain areas (unavoidable) that are triggers. But, because we have played tug on walks to get through them, he can release his energy via tug vs. on me. Is his energy nervous, excited, anxious, aroused, or all of the above? I don't know, but by the end of one especially vigorous tug game, he started rolling around on the ground very relaxed and contentedly and I pet him, and we were able to finish out walk calmly. Imagine the difference if I had pushed, yelled, or choked him with a collar? Instead, it became a bonding activity.

Later in the day, my daughter accidentally let him out of the yard TWICE when I was in the driveway getting ready to leave. And both times? He came right to me-- that's why he wanted to get out! Now, I know part of it is the breed, part of it is temperament, but at least part of it is our bond.

We play tug this way:
Prep
(1) Teach dog to take an object in his mouth
(2) Put this on cue
(3) Teach dog to release object
(4) Put this on cue

Tug
(1) Hold tug toy up for dog to see
(2) Wait for automatic sit
(3) Give cue for tug
(4) Play
(5) Cue release, reinforce with food or more tug, but always end with a positive
(6) Let dog win, give food for trade of toy when game is ending (I can't let my dog keep most of the toys because he would rip them up)

His mouthing is almost non-existent now, even in stressed situations. He will jump but not mouth. But, we always have objects handy for his mouth because he can use them as a release.

http://www.goldenretrieverforum.com...2-jumpy-mouthy-resource-support-thread-2.html

Please go to the linked page as Anele has another good post a few posts later.
 

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Hi everyone!

My boy, Koa, just turned 9 months old and a problem has started that I cant seem to stop...

I taught him bite inhibition from an early age, but recently he is biting hands or arms and will grab onto a person's clothes or nip at legs.

Triggers:

  • When its morning, he will follow me around the whole time I am getting ready for work, sometimes with a toy in his mouth and sometimes without. He will jump up on me and nip at my clothes. I can stand still and tell him to "calm" but as soon as I move he is back on me. Or he has a toy in his mouth and will literally, not even joking, come up behind me and nip me in the butt!!! Then proceed to jump and nip on my hands. Yes, I know this is a sign that he wants to play. The issue is how he is going about it.
  • Let me prelude this one by saying, HE LOVES TO PLAY TUG! Even with balls... He loves to fetch the ball but he wont drop it or leave it although he does know the "leave it" command when he goes for something he's not supposed to go for and hes pretty good with that. With his toys and especially balls... Not good at all. So, while playing tug (ropes, stuffed toys, etc) he will play with me but will try to bite where my hands are on the toy. He has bitten me pretty good a couple times. It's like he doesnt understand not to bite my hands or not so hard. With playing fetch, like i said, he will not drop the ball and I ask him to leave it and he wont. I go to take it from him and he will try to bite my hands and wants to play tug with the ball, which I wont allow. also when he returns the ball he throws himself at me and jumps with ful body weight that I can actually be knocked over if I dont see him coming.
  • He will also have a toy in his mouth when I am home at night and he will nip at my hands with it. and has bitten me too a few times like this pretty good on the hand or arm. I know this is a sign he wants to play but not the behavior I want when he wants this.
  • Last, I will let him jump on me when I come home and "hug" me, but sometimes when I start petting him he will bite my hands and my arm. He will jump off me with my arm still in his mouth! He has left bruises on my arm from biting my arms like chew toys and me trying to get away from him.
  • Also, he does all of this with my father too, who actually likes to play rough with him. He will jump on my mother and she freaks out, but he thinks her freaking out is "play" and does it more.

Things I have tried:
  • First, I tell him "NO BITE" and take him by the collar and put him in his kennel for about min. When I come back and let him out, he still repeats the same behaviors.
  • I will tell him "NO BITE" and give him a light tap on the nose or wrap my fingers around his lower jaw so he cant bite me (not hard, people! I dont ever hurt him or hit him EVER!) But he thinks this is play too and just gets more agressive with it. So that doesnt work either
  • I have tried the squirt bottle, but he loves water to all extents so he thinks that he is just getting a drink or its play. Behavior still continues.
  • I stop playing with him and ignore him when he bites with the toy. But he doesnt seem to care. He will either bite at my hands to continue playing or if I get up on the bed (which he hasnt figured how to get on yet because he doesnt realize he has backlegs lol) he will continue playing with the toy by himself. Growling and throwing it around and whipping his head back and forth with it like it is evil and he needs to destroy it. He doesnt care I stopped playing.

Other info you need to know:
  • I got him at 8 weeks old from a reputiable breeder and comes from a line of champions.
  • He has been to obidience school and passed his AKC puppy test at almost 5 months old. He has had training from me and we train a few times a week.
  • I work during the day so my mother takes care of him. I dont think she exercises him during the day but she always says he's so relaxed during the day and doesnt jump on her. Only when I am around.
  • YES, he gets exercise. If I get home late, I play tug (or try to with him biting) until he is disinterested, panting extremely and goes and lays down.
  • Or if I get home early he goes for a two mile walk with me on a no pull lead because he will literally drag me down the road if I didnt have it. Then we play fetch or at least try to when he actually wants to leave the ball. But he is very possessive over it so even if I reach for it he will go for it or try to bite my hand. Maybe he needs more exercise? Maybe he doesnt? But I give it my best to tire him out and he sleeps from 10pm to 6am every night because he is tired.
  • He is 9 months old and NOT nuetered. I am up in the air about getting him nuetered at this time. But maybe if I do, he will calm down???
  • He does not have any food aggression, I can put my hand in his dish or take it away and he doesnt bite or bark or growel. I can take his treats away and he is still fine. He doesnt beg at the table.
  • There was one scary incident with him when I had him out in the snow. He got so crazy and was running around like a mad man and then came back to me and was biting my legs and hands and arms and coat and he wouldnt stop. He finally had me up agaisnt a tree and I let him off the leash and threw a stick near-by and he finally stopped. It was not the dog I knew and raised. It was like he was a completely different dog when this happened.
  • When he is overexcited he jumps. But with strangers he just brings them a toy or keeps a toy in his mouth and goes in circles around them. Doesnt really jump on them at all. Just general golden excitement to see a new person.

IF ANYONE HAS BEEN THROUGH THIS OR CAN HELP ME, PLEASE ANSWER! I am exhausted of it. I cant make him stop and its getting out of hand. If anyone has any other questions, please ask!!!! I really want to solve this and I feel like I am at such a loss. I feel like a bad dog mommy. :crying:

Also, he is my first golden. I am an animal person and have researched the breed endlessly. I know they are mouthy and he may never stop biting, but ITS THE DEGREE OF BITING. He has to stop hurting me and others who he plays with.
hi I have a 8 1/2 month old golden retriever with the same exact problems and i tried EVERYTHING and she still is not understanding that what she is doing is wrong. She jumps up on me and everyone in my family, she bites and grabs clothing which when she bites us it’s hard and leaves marks and holes in clothing. When she is about to bite her nose wrinkles. We take her on walks and play but playing with her is difficult because when i grab the tennis ball and throw it she gets it and comes back but then makes me get it from her mouth and when i do she then jumps and holds me while biting me and i tell her i’m gonna throw it but doesn’t listen and still continues to chump on my sweatshirt. Anyway i was just wondering what ever happened to Koa since it’s been almost 4 years!! What did u do to make him calm and stop biting, thank you!!
 

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hi I have a 8 1/2 month old golden retriever with the same exact problems and i tried EVERYTHING and she still is not understanding that what she is doing is wrong. She jumps up on me and everyone in my family, she bites and grabs clothing which when she bites us it’s hard and leaves marks and holes in clothing. When she is about to bite her nose wrinkles. We take her on walks and play but playing with her is difficult because when i grab the tennis ball and throw it she gets it and comes back but then makes me get it from her mouth and when i do she then jumps and holds me while biting me and i tell her i’m gonna throw it but doesn’t listen and still continues to chump on my sweatshirt. Anyway i was just wondering what ever happened to Koa since it’s been almost 4 years!! What did u do to make him calm and stop biting, thank you!!
Please find a good training center and have some private sessions with a trainer. What you need is someone to teach you how to train her. She's a teenager and acting like a brat, and you need direction from a professional to teach you how to manage, redirect, and train correct behaviors instead.
 
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