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So, my twin sister and I adopted a Golden Retriever from a friend of the family. We've never owned a Golden Retriever, Labradors and a Pyrenees, but no Golden.

The thing is, Citori has like, absolutely no training. The previous owners said she knew basic commands and was a very well behaved dog. That hasn't been the case so far.

Now, she's not aggressive in any way or form, she just doesn't listen. I helped with training the two Labs we have, but Citori just turned 2 in May. My sister and I have no idea what the best way to train her is.

She will work for treats, but she lunges and nips for them as well. She really likes to jump on people, she will not come when called if she is not on a leash, and she play bites a lot as well.

She does really well with letting us know she needs outside, and does well on a leash. We would just need help with basic training that she should have got as a puppy.
 

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Welcome aboard! It's good that the housetraining and loose leash walking are going well! She sounds like a good young golden that just needs help learning her basic good manners (no biting, no jumping) and foundation behaviors that she might not have gotten. That must be a rough surprise, if her owner led you to believe that she already had those things down, but it sounds like she's food motivated and happy to please, which is great. If she didn't learn good manners as a puppy, they can still be taught, but it'll take some time and patience for her to unlearn all the things that have worked for her so far (jumping up, nipping, etc) and replace them with new behaviors. But it's absolutely do-able.

Since it sounds like you're struggling a little, have you considered looking into any local dog classes? Most places have a few training centers offering basic good manners and basic obedience courses - many of those classes are designed for adult dogs and are focused on not just teaching the dog, but on giving you the skills to keep training them once the class is over. It may also be helpful to have some in-person guidance on Citori and what to work on/how to prioritize that. When we did Abby's basic obedience classes as a puppy, most of the rest of the class was adult dogs, including a few local dogs from the SPCA who had never received basic training as a puppy and were learning manners before being adopted out. They did great! If you want to also try working on things at home, I recommend Sue Ailsby's Training Levels - they're free, easy to follow, and will give you a place to start. I'd especially suggest checking out how to teach "Zen" (bottom of page) or games like "It's Yer Choice" - they'll help with impulse control more generally but especially the "grabbing/lunging for treats" issue. But I'd really suggest trying to get her into a class if possible, especially for help with things like the mouthing and jumping.

While you're working on teaching her the new behaviors you want, you also might think about how to manage the old problematic behaviors until she learns what it is you want her to do. For instance, for now - if she doesn't come when called off leash, don't let her off-leash or keep her on a long line. You'll be working on teaching her to come, of course, but until then don't keep letting her practice bad behaviors.
 

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Congrats on your new best friend!
Not sure how long you have had Citori, but if she is fairly new to you, they can take some time to 'settle in', adjust, adapt to their new home, and for the 'real' dog to come out. Moving in stressful and confusing for them, which makes it hard for them to listen, and to attend to even well known cues and can cause them to act 'out of character' for them.

One of the first things I work on with a new puppy or older dog is teaching 'eye contact' - teaching them that is rewarding to pay attention to me. It is much easier to teach other skills if the dog is paying attention, and looking for direction. Some people find using a clicker a bit cumbersome, and use a marker word such as 'Yes' instead.

The following may be helpful to you.
http://www.clickertraining.com/files/auto-eye-contact.pdf


Until you have had time to teach her a reliable recall, for her own safety don't let her off leash, especially in an area that is not secured by a fence. You may want to use a 'long line' (a long leash or rope) for those times when you want to give her a little more freedom to sniff and do 'dog things', but letting her run free, and practice ignoring the recall cue will hinder your efforts in training a reliable recall.


Training a Steadfast Recall | Karen Pryor Clicker Training

When I work with dogs, I try to focus on what I want them 'TO DO' instead of the unwelcome behavior. For example: Instead of jumping up, I would rather the dog sit - 'say please'. So I work at teaching a reliable, consistent response to the sit cue, by teaching and rewarding it in as many locations and situations as we can find.

Grabbing at treats, and jumping up can be stress related behaviors, the dog is anxious, has little self control, and in all fairness, may not know what it 'should' do instead.
Teaching Your Dog to Take Treats Gently | The Bark

Above all, patience and practice (lots of practice) and focusing on teaching and rewarding the behaviors you want your girl to repeat, avoid punishing for mistakes, we all make mistakes, punishment is not helpful when teaching a dog, and can teach a dog to be apprehensive of you.
 
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