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Our 3 yr old golden retriever Cally is having accidents only when around one specific person. When they go to pet her, instead of sitting and waiting to be pet like with everyone else, she either squats and urinates a little, or if on her back, leaks a little unto herself. She only does this with this one specific person. In terms of emotions, she is excited at the time, not fearful. At first we were not concerned because it was a rare occasion to be around this person - but the past few days this person, my brother, has been doggy sitting at our place while we're away and its been happening mutliple times a day with him. I've read online that incontinence can be related to hormone levels that affect control of the muscles keeping urine in - but confused as to why it only happens with this one person, even when she has no need to go "out" for a potty stop. It is not only concerning because this person is family so will be around her from time to time even if we never have him doggy-sit again, but because I imagine Cally herself is not happy about having accidents inside - a thing she never does and may upset her is happening to herself out of control. Has anyone experienced this or know anything about it?
 

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It's not about hormones. It's a behavior called "submissive urination." It's something a young dog will do when he or she is feeling intimidated or excited and wants to please a person or another dog. It's very normal and they tend to grow out of it.

Whatever you do, don't yell at her! It'll just confirm the behavior as a permanent habit. There's something your brother is doing that is particularly scary, intimidating, or exciting. He might have a lower voice, be larger than the average person she deals with, give her a lot of eye contact that she's interpreting as intimidation, etc.

If he's roughhousing or disciplining her in an intimidating way while he's dog-sitting, that could also cause it.

If it's really severe and he's not doing anything to actively contribute to it, he can deliberately make himself less intimidating. He can approach her sideways, avoid eye contact, and speak in a higher voice to her and around her.

As far as reversing it: when he first enters the house, have him ignore her for a good ten minutes. No petting her, no talking to her, no eye contact, no attention of any kind. Then, he can positive train her with some simple behaviors so she learns some easy ways to please him that don't involve peeing. If she does pee, just ignore it, walk away with her, clean up while she's not around, and continue the positive training. She needs to learn a bunch of things she can do to please people so she won't resort to peeing, which makes sense in dog language but is inconvenient for us.
 

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and now Chance too!
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When Brooks was a puppy, he would do this whenever young, pretty girls would talk to him.......
That use to happen to me as well... I grew out of it eventually... :curtain:
:D:D
 
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