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First Time Dog Owner
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi! Me and my family have been having a problem with Koda biting. He used to nibble, and now as time has passed, he's started to rip our clothes, skin, and chew our cabinets. It seems as if we've tried everything! We praise him when he does a good job, we've ignored him, we've calmed him down, we've used stern voices telling him to stop, and we've put him in time-out. Nothing has worked!:crying: So, I came here, looking for tips!
I also had one question. Should I let my pup roam around the house?
Thanks!
Baby_Golden0:)
 

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Sounds like you are in prime teething time. Do you have lots of chew toys to use instead of being the target? As far as having the run of the house I'd say unless she is monitored it's too soon. Do you use a crate?
 

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First Time Dog Owner
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Discussion Starter #3
Yes, I do have lot's of teething toys. I've bought different types of bones (fake bones or edible bones no rawhide) I've gotten different balls, all different types of toys. We try to distract him by clapping, or showing him his toys, It doesn't work. We've even tried spraying him with water. He actually likes when we spray him, he also try to lick it. And yes, we use a crate. I hope everything get's cleared up soon.
 

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Kristy
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Koda should not be allowed to roam the house at all. You will have the worst time with potty training if you do not restrict his freedom. In our house we gate our puppy in the kitchen and have a crate in there and that is where we hang out and play with the puppy. Take up any throw rugs and make sure you have plenty of appropriate chew toys. Keep toys in a couple different baskets and rotate them to keep things interesting. No one is allowed to sit on the floor and play with the puppy unless they have a stuffed toy in their hand. When the puppy starts to bite tell him "eh-eh' no bite in a stern tone and then put the toy in his mouth and say in a happy voice "here is what you chew". Keep being very consistent and understand it will take time to get through this phase.

You can rub a little bit of butter on the back of your hand and teach him to 'kiss-kiss' and if you work on this it can begin to be an alternative command when the biting starts.

Understand that often puppies bite when they are over stimulated, too much chaos, and when they are over-tired. Puppies are like babies and require regular play time alternating with regular nap time and potty breaks every 30 minutes. Set a timer to keep on schedule. Always hide treats in the crate so every time he ever steps foot in the crate he finds something yummy. When he is crated make sure he has appropriate chew items like a puppy kong or a puppy nylabone.

Ultimately if the puppy continues to bite and you're being careful about managing him (see above) an adult in the family can work on letting him see that there are consequences to biting people - turn your hand in his mouth when he bites and use your finger to curl his upper lip over the edge of his top teeth - apply just enough gentle pressure to show him it's not pleasant - DO NOT press so hard his teeth cut his lip. This is just enough to show him that when he bites it is not pleasant. Don't give any other reaction, no fuss and don't lose your temper. He is old enough that this needs to stop.

At 16 weeks he is also probably needing increased exercise and training time - what are you doing now that is giving him more than what he received at 8 or9 weeks?

Do not leave the puppy unattended if you can't give him your full attention (you have to cook or switch the laundry or watch t.v. or check your email) the puppy goes into the crate. No exceptions. This is how you can make sure your home, furniture, cabinets and rugs are not destroyed by tiny teeth. This will be important for the entire first year or so depending on the dog. They will also chew to burn off excess energy as they grow and require more exercise and when they are bored if they are left alone and not receiving enough play time and training time with people.

If you're not enrollled in training classes yet, it's time to find a good one and get signed up. Discuss good choices with your vet or contact a local obedience club or agility club for referrals. Understand that Goldens need training and practice with obedience to be good family dogs - plan on spending the first two years of his life pretty much always enrolled in classes. It gives you good reminder to practice daily and you will have access to an experienced trainer who can help you with behavior issues in person which is the best way to get help and advice. Online forums can only do so much.
 

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First Time Dog Owner
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Discussion Starter #5
Koda should not be allowed to roam the house at all. You will have the worst time with potty training if you do not restrict his freedom. In our house we gate our puppy in the kitchen and have a crate in there and that is where we hang out and play with the puppy. Take up any throw rugs and make sure you have plenty of appropriate chew toys. Keep toys in a couple different baskets and rotate them to keep things interesting. No one is allowed to sit on the floor and play with the puppy unless they have a stuffed toy in their hand. When the puppy starts to bite tell him "eh-eh' no bite in a stern tone and then put the toy in his mouth and say in a happy voice "here is what you chew". Keep being very consistent and understand it will take time to get through this phase.

You can rub a little bit of butter on the back of your hand and teach him to 'kiss-kiss' and if you work on this it can begin to be an alternative command when the biting starts.

Understand that often puppies bite when they are over stimulated, too much chaos, and when they are over-tired. Puppies are like babies and require regular play time alternating with regular nap time and potty breaks every 30 minutes. Set a timer to keep on schedule. Always hide treats in the crate so every time he ever steps foot in the crate he finds something yummy. When he is crated make sure he has appropriate chew items like a puppy kong or a puppy nylabone.

Ultimately if the puppy continues to bite and you're being careful about managing him (see above) an adult in the family can work on letting him see that there are consequences to biting people - turn your hand in his mouth when he bites and use your finger to curl his upper lip over the edge of his top teeth - apply just enough gentle pressure to show him it's not pleasant - DO NOT press so hard his teeth cut his lip. This is just enough to show him that when he bites it is not pleasant. Don't give any other reaction, no fuss and don't lose your temper. He is old enough that this needs to stop.

At 16 weeks he is also probably needing increased exercise and training time - what are you doing now that is giving him more than what he received at 8 or9 weeks?

Do not leave the puppy unattended if you can't give him your full attention (you have to cook or switch the laundry or watch t.v. or check your email) the puppy goes into the crate. No exceptions. This is how you can make sure your home, furniture, cabinets and rugs are not destroyed by tiny teeth. This will be important for the entire first year or so depending on the dog. They will also chew to burn off excess energy as they grow and require more exercise and when they are bored if they are left alone and not receiving enough play time and training time with people.

If you're not enrollled in training classes yet, it's time to find a good one and get signed up. Discuss good choices with your vet or contact a local obedience club or agility club for referrals. Understand that Goldens need training and practice with obedience to be good family dogs - plan on spending the first two years of his life pretty much always enrolled in classes. It gives you good reminder to practice daily and you will have access to an experienced trainer who can help you with behavior issues in person which is the best way to get help and advice. Online forums can only do so much.
Thanks for the tips! I'm not real sure what I'm doing differently. I think we gave him more freedom and exercise at 8 or 9 weeks. The only freedom we gave him was being able to go into the dining room and the kitchen. Everything else was fenced off. Now we give him littler exercise (still trying to take him for at least one walk per day) and littler freedom.
 

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Hello and welcome to the forum. Have you tried using Bitter Apple spray (at least for the furniture) ?? I would not let Koda have too much freedom unsupervised. Doesn't sound like he's earned it. Good luck!
 

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PatrickLiamMeg
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We have two 4 month old Golden boys (brothers). Both are doing well with house training but are chewing everything and anything they can sink their teeth into (with the exception of any Kong toy that I have bought them: I must be doing something wrong with those!!) Toby, the bigger of the two, is very mellow, sweet & eager to please. He seldom barks, never mouths people, & seems to have shorter window from the time he lets you know he needs to go to the point of explosion. But Brady, his brother, nips all the time and barks like crazy and seems to think my arms and bare feet are chew toys. During the day, they are in the living room with me. We set their exercise pen around the perimeter and have moved out anything that seems chewable to them; at bedtime or when we leave the house, they are in their crate. My sons, 16 and 21, take them for walks and to play in the yard roughly every 2-3 hours from 7 am until 11 p.m. Their crate is my 16-year-old's bedroom; sometimes, in the evening, one or the other of the puppies will bark at the gate until Liam comes and opens it for the barking puppy to trot to Liam's room and hang out in their crate (crate door open because Liam is in the room). Still, Brady can be crazy in his barking, jumping, and nipping. He barks madly if we move any item of furniture or decoration to a new place (even places he can't reach). He barks when either of the boys enter the living room. He barks ferociously when either of the boys sits where I usually sit in the living room. He also barks wildly at his own image in the mirror or window. If I speak to him in a stern voice, he barks and growls at me (!), almost as if he thinks I have stepped out of line. The nipping really worries me, though. Harmless as it is at 25 lbs., it won't be so harmless when he reaches his adult size. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Meg
 

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First Time Dog Owner
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Discussion Starter #8
Hello and welcome to the forum. Have you tried using Bitter Apple spray (at least for the furniture) ?? I would not let Koda have too much freedom unsupervised. Doesn't sound like he's earned it. Good luck!
I've tried using bitter apple spray and it works! The problem is you have to reapply it so many times. I'll try and keep up with spraying it on there for the sake of our furniture! :smile2:
 

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Kristy
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....I think we gave him more freedom and exercise at 8 or 9 weeks. The only freedom we gave him was being able to go into the dining room and the kitchen. Everything else was fenced off. Now we give him littler exercise (still trying to take him for at least one walk per day) and littler freedom.
What is his schedule like? How long is he crated over night and how long is he crated while you all are gone during the day - is anyone home with him?

He still should not have a lot of freedom in the house - you are still potty training. But this means he should have MANY play sessions, training sessions and outdoor walks and fun playtime. He is going to be getting stronger and stronger every week, like a human child goes from being a toddler to a preschooler to a super busy kid who only sleeps when he has to. When you were a kid would you EVER nap unless you were forced to? No! You wanted to be outside playing with your friends, exploring and learning about the world. If someone would have confined you for 8 hours a day you would have gone NUTS!

Not only is your puppy teething , but he is also full of energy that needs to be burned off. Too much energy overflow means that your puppy can't focus and can't learn self control.

Leave a notebook on your kitchen counter and keep a daily note of the times he goes out, is played with, is practicing obedience training, is playing, is getting fun time. It may be an eye opener when you see what his day is really like. His obedience practice only needs to be 5 minutes but it needs to happen 2 or 3 times a day. The more effort you put into him now, the more awesome of a dog he will be as an adult.

With the weather cooling off (hopefully) try to take him more places, always have a baggie full of treats in your pocket, have him sit for petting from a stranger and ask them to give him a treat. Take him anywhere you can think of that there wouldn't be a bunch of stray dogs - carry him if you have to - the school bus stop when kids are getting home or leaving for school - in front of a kids dance studio or martial arts center, play ground, library - the more you work on getting him out and meeting people the better. Have a toy in case he is bitey that you can put in his mouth.

Find a safe place to go hiking - attach a 30 foot long nylon cord to his collar that will make it easy for you to catch him if he wanders off. Use treats to reward him every time he checks in with you. Buy a cheap kids plastic wading pool and fill it up to let him splash - buy non toxic kids or dog bubbles and blow bubbles on a breezy day to let him chase. Get creative. The more you do with him the better.

Enroll in obedience class and plan to take classes for the next two years. It is worth every penny. Print up the suggestions that you see on this forum that you think could work well at your house. Save them in your puppy notebook and it will help you remember to do all these things at your house. It's easy to forget if you don't keep notes and stay on top of this. Puppies are a long term project.
 

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Rosie will be 12 weeks next Thursday and we are in the same boat. She LOVES to nibble on the corners of my baseboards! ARGH! Rosie now has every toy on earth that is made for extreme chewers (some last 5 minutes, others 10 if I am lucky). All of the time when she is up I am on her -- it's exhausting and I am not getting anything else done, but not sure what else to do. Because I've caught her in the act, and said a stern "NO!" she's backing off a bit. I also exercise her as much as I can (definitely not overboard for her age).

When all else fails she has to go in the crate- and I used to feel guilt about that, but no longer. I have cuts all over my hands and my poor senior labrador is packing her bones with one paw out the door.... :)

Nevertheless, you are not alone- and this is all normal for golden pups.

Alicia
 

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First Time Dog Owner
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Discussion Starter #11
What is his schedule like? How long is he crated over night and how long is he crated while you all are gone during the day - is anyone home with him?

He still should not have a lot of freedom in the house - you are still potty training. But this means he should have MANY play sessions, training sessions and outdoor walks and fun playtime. He is going to be getting stronger and stronger every week, like a human child goes from being a toddler to a preschooler to a super busy kid who only sleeps when he has to. When you were a kid would you EVER nap unless you were forced to? No! You wanted to be outside playing with your friends, exploring and learning about the world. If someone would have confined you for 8 hours a day you would have gone NUTS!

Not only is your puppy teething , but he is also full of energy that needs to be burned off. Too much energy overflow means that your puppy can't focus and can't learn self control.

Leave a notebook on your kitchen counter and keep a daily note of the times he goes out, is played with, is practicing obedience training, is playing, is getting fun time. It may be an eye opener when you see what his day is really like. His obedience practice only needs to be 5 minutes but it needs to happen 2 or 3 times a day. The more effort you put into him now, the more awesome of a dog he will be as an adult.

With the weather cooling off (hopefully) try to take him more places, always have a baggie full of treats in your pocket, have him sit for petting from a stranger and ask them to give him a treat. Take him anywhere you can think of that there wouldn't be a bunch of stray dogs - carry him if you have to - the school bus stop when kids are getting home or leaving for school - in front of a kids dance studio or martial arts center, play ground, library - the more you work on getting him out and meeting people the better. Have a toy in case he is bitey that you can put in his mouth.

Find a safe place to go hiking - attach a 30 foot long nylon cord to his collar that will make it easy for you to catch him if he wanders off. Use treats to reward him every time he checks in with you. Buy a cheap kids plastic wading pool and fill it up to let him splash - buy non toxic kids or dog bubbles and blow bubbles on a breezy day to let him chase. Get creative. The more you do with him the better.

Enroll in obedience class and plan to take classes for the next two years. It is worth every penny. Print up the suggestions that you see on this forum that you think could work well at your house. Save them in your puppy notebook and it will help you remember to do all these things at your house. It's easy to forget if you don't keep notes and stay on top of this. Puppies are a long term project.
Lately. I've been having a problem with picking him up. Whenever I reach down to pick him up he growls and bites and thinks that I want to fight. Also, I have enrolled him in puppy classes. He's only had two classes so far and I can already see a bit of progress. Should I be taking him places everyday if possible? I know that socializing at his age is crucial. I've taken him to a dog park once and we let him off leash in a small area where we could see him wherever we were. There were two other dogs in that area and he only seemed afraid of them even when they were doing no harm. The same thing happened at puppy classes, they had some off leash time to interact with the pups his age, and all he did was run away. Why is he doing that when he's always so dominant with us?
Thanks!
Baby_Golden
 

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Josie was definitely a biter! From the get go I showed that I was master from a trick I learned from my aunt. She would put her hand around their snout, have them look into her eyes and just sternly say no. Especially when biting, this helped Josie understand it's not okay. I will occasionally let her lightly gnaw on my fingers, but the second it gets too rough, hand around the snout. I am not scared to let her around little kids now because unless she's just playing too rough with someone, she won't put their hands in her mouth at all! It takes some time to learn, but the pup will catch on!
 

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First Time Dog Owner
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Discussion Starter #13
Josie was definitely a biter! From the get go I showed that I was master from a trick I learned from my aunt. She would put her hand around their snout, have them look into her eyes and just sternly say no. Especially when biting, this helped Josie understand it's not okay. I will occasionally let her lightly gnaw on my fingers, but the second it gets too rough, hand around the snout. I am not scared to let her around little kids now because unless she's just playing too rough with someone, she won't put their hands in her mouth at all! It takes some time to learn, but the pup will catch on!
The worst thing is, Koda only bites us! He would never in a million years bite somebody else. We've tried telling him no in a stern voice, holding his snout, he just doesn't get it! Whenever I bend down to pet him and tell him he's a good boy, he takes that as a threat and attacks! I know that dogs are supposed to like their crate, but I don't know what else to do so I just put him in his crate whenever he's being a bad boy. This is our very first dog, and I love him, but he's crazy!
 

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First Time Dog Owner
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Discussion Starter #14
Koda was just attacking another family member so I went in there, grabbed his snout, looked him in the eyes, and told him in a stern voice "No", and it worked! The first thing that has ever worked on that crazy little man. Awesome tip! I'll definitely recommend that tip to other people:grin2:
 

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Premium Member
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Lately. I've been having a problem with picking him up. Whenever I reach down to pick him up he growls and bites and thinks that I want to fight. Also, I have enrolled him in puppy classes. He's only had two classes so far and I can already see a bit of progress. Should I be taking him places everyday if possible? I know that socializing at his age is crucial. I've taken him to a dog park once and we let him off leash in a small area where we could see him wherever we were. There were two other dogs in that area and he only seemed afraid of them even when they were doing no harm. The same thing happened at puppy classes, they had some off leash time to interact with the pups his age, and all he did was run away. Why is he doing that when he's always so dominant with us?
Thanks!
Baby_Golden
He isn't dominant with you. He is a totally normal puppy, using his mouth on everything in his environment, including you, and it is 100% normal. He has no thought at all about trying to be dominant. Keep toys he likes to chew on nearby all the time and physically put them in his mouth, encourage him to play with them, and when he does praise him.

He is not used to being around other dogs, so it's also normal for him to be uncertain around strange dogs. DON'T take him to the dog park, you can't control the other dogs and they could easily hurt him or just scare him, and that can leave a life long fear of other dogs. You also don't know if the dogs at the dog park are fully vaccinated or could be exposing him to contagious illnesses.

Find friends with puppy friendly dogs and get together with them for short visits so he can interact with dogs you know and people you know will control their dog.
 

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Kristy
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9,607 Posts
Lately. I've been having a problem with picking him up. Whenever I reach down to pick him up he growls and bites and thinks that I want to fight. Also, I have enrolled him in puppy classes. He's only had two classes so far and I can already see a bit of progress. Should I be taking him places everyday if possible? I know that socializing at his age is crucial. I've taken him to a dog park once and we let him off leash in a small area where we could see him wherever we were. There were two other dogs in that area and he only seemed afraid of them even when they were doing no harm. The same thing happened at puppy classes, they had some off leash time to interact with the pups his age, and all he did was run away. Why is he doing that when he's always so dominant with us?
Thanks!
Baby_Golden

Why didn't you answer the questions I posted?

Your puppy is letting you know that he doesn't want to be picked up. Start thinking about how you're picking him up - he may be getting to big and it's uncomfortable or you're interrupting him. Don't pick him up unless there is really a reason to do so - talk to him first, don't startle him. If you need to interrupt him, get a treat and call him to you. Have him drag a short leash cut off to about 2 feet long and let him drag it, use that to control him if he won't listen, don't just grab him.

Dog Parks are not the place to socialize puppies, please take time to read the threads on this link and make sure you understand the risks involved: http://www.goldenretrieverforum.com...r/458906-puppies-do-not-belong-dog-parks.html

If you puppy acts fearful at puppy class, what have you discussed with the instructor on how to make it a better experience for him? If he is afraid it's not something you want to keep subjecting him to. Talk to the group leader.
 

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Kristy
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He isn't dominant with you. He is a totally normal puppy, using his mouth on everything in his environment, including you, and it is 100% normal. He has no thought at all about trying to be dominant. Keep toys he likes to chew on nearby all the time and physically put them in his mouth, encourage him to play with them, and when he does praise him.

He is not used to being around other dogs, so it's also normal for him to be uncertain around strange dogs. DON'T take him to the dog park, you can't control the other dogs and they could easily hurt him or just scare him, and that can leave a life long fear of other dogs. You also don't know if the dogs at the dog park are fully vaccinated or could be exposing him to contagious illnesses.

Find friends with puppy friendly dogs and get together with them for short visits so he can interact with dogs you know and people you know will control their dog.
Please read through this a couple of times and make sure it all sinks in. She is giving you good advice.

I'm starting to wonder if you have read a single thing we have posted here?
 
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