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Discussion Starter #21
Foster a senior. There are never enough homes for an elderly dog. If you foster, all vet expenses are paid by the rescue group. Then you can look for a breeder in a calm, relaxed way and take time to find the right dog.
Rescues aren’t answering applications. I’ve filled out at least seven or eight. Wrote long letter to accompany them...nothing.... Golden Heart won’t even let you put an application in! They say come back after COVID. Everyone is clambering for dogs thanks to COVID.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Would you believe, that even volunteering to foster brings this reply:
Hi Lorelei,
Thank you for reaching out. Right now since we have the large kennel facility we are not in need of any foster homes. Should that change though we will be in touch.
Have a great day,
( name removed) ABCDT
Adoption Manager
 

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I checked our closest breed rescue and they only have 7 dogs. I’ve never seen anything like it. Usually they have many more. I checked another large breed rescue that usually handles around 100 dogs at a time, and they are below 30. About half are mixed breed and the rest have behavior problems, most of which can’t be in a home with other animals. I’m worried when this is over how many of those hastily adopted dogs will land back in shelters or will be ignored or untrained. It’s a scary time for dogs.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
That’s exactly what I’ve been saying! I braved the shelter yesterday to search for a dog. Any dog that might need me that could fit our home. There were so many people there! I was terrified of Covid, but I stood there waiting to adopt a black pup and then there was a problem. They had over-promised that pup and now there was a dispute over who was first, us or the other family. I had been standing there with a pit in my gut, thinking should I be doing this? So...I took it as a sign and said..”I’m going to make this easier for you, give it to them” The mother of the other family was so relieved, I could see her just -breathe-...she had young kids with her...so I touched her arm and said, you enjoy Able..take good care of him. She smiled and said she would. And we walked out to the van ..and I cried.
 

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Just food for thought if you are considering the BYB route... Don't let the fact that you had a good, long-lived dog from a BYB years ago lull you into thinking the risks are minimal now. My first dog (as a kid) was also BYB. She had hip dysplasia (fixed with a simple operation back then) but otherwise lived almost 16 years in good health. BUT... That was in the 1970s. The health and longevity of Goldens have changed dramatically in the last 30+ years. It's not just HD you have to worry about anymore, but elbow dysplasia, heart problems, some pretty serious eye problems, and a huge increase in the cancer rate. Even reputable breeders can't guarantee that their puppies won't develop any of these issues, but at least they do everything they can to screen their breeding stock for the common issues, and can also, hopefully, talk knowledgeably about cancer and longevity in their lines (not only the dam and sire but their ancestors and siblings as well). I doubt very many BYB can do the same (and promises of "cancer-free lines" or "my vet says they're both in great health" aren't worth the breath they're said with...).
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Just food for thought if you are considering the BYB route... Don't let the fact that you had a good, long-lived dog from a BYB years ago lull you into thinking the risks are minimal now. My first dog (as a kid) was also BYB. She had hip dysplasia (fixed with a simple operation back then) but otherwise lived almost 16 years in good health. BUT... That was in the 1970s. The health and longevity of Goldens have changed dramatically in the last 30+ years. It's not just HD you have to worry about anymore, but elbow dysplasia, heart problems, some pretty serious eye problems, and a huge increase in the cancer rate. Even reputable breeders can't guarantee that their puppies won't develop any of these issues, but at least they do everything they can to screen their breeding stock for the common issues, and can also, hopefully, talk knowledgeably about cancer and longevity in their lines (not only the dam and sire but their ancestors and siblings as well). I doubt very many BYB can do the same (and promises of "cancer-free lines" or "my vet says they're both in great health" aren't worth the breath they're said with...).
Yes, I’m aware. I know the risks...too well. Last three Goldens from reputable breeders, all gone from cancer. Until the USA gets tougher on cancer causing agents they sell at every hardware store, nothing will change either. We do what we can to keep those chemicals out of our own yards, but walking the dog is always a crapshoot. I’m trying to just get ON a **** breeders list! It’s never been this hard.
 

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I’m trying to just get ON a **** breeders list! It’s never been this hard.
I hear you... It's always a challenge but it's insane right now. I'm sure you know that ideally you want to narrow down to a handful of breeders that you feel good about and then get on their wait lists. There may be breeders out there that you don't know about (not all breeders have websites). We might be able to help you there. First thing I would recommend is using the search function of the forum to see what breeders have been recommended before (search across all states you are willing to consider - e.g., there are LOTS of good breeders in New England). Don't be put off by some of the older posts/recommendations... remember breeders often breed for many years... those that were recommended 10 years ago may still be breeding. When you reach out to breeders, if they say they don't have breeding plans 1) make it clear what your time frame is... if you're willing to wait two years, tell them that! 2) Ask if they can recommend any other breeders you should investigate... especially any that might not have a web presence.
 

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Check the Potomac Valley Golden Retriever Club website. The club puppy referral contact is very knowledgeable about many breeders and keeps up to date on litters. She could be very helpful in your search.
 
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