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Congratulations! What a great feeling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Goldhaven, yes we kept one. Her AKC name is Unsinkable Molly (since the litter was born on the day titanic was re-released). She is gorgeous, but I could be biased. She is also very smart and eager to please. We have stayed in touch with all the owners, and the entire litter is doing great. Their families just love them!
 

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Rocky, Golden Retriever.
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Congratulations on the good news. I am sure it was a lot of work to get that all done.
 

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Thyroid tests? How is that test done? Normally thyroid problems don't show up for years.
Thyroid levels can be tested at any time with a blood test. Robbie was tested before he was two and needed medication.

Congrats on the clearances. And pictures of your pup are required! (jk)
 

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Wyatt Earp
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Thyroid levels can be tested at any time with a blood test. Robbie was tested before he was two and needed medication.

Congrats on the clearances. And pictures of your pup are required! (jk)
I know how they are tested LOL. My point is how can this reliable down the road? As my boy was diagnosed when he was 5 years old.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thyroid tests? How is that test done? Normally thyroid problems don't show up for years.
Thyroid test is a blood test. We decided that we wanted to do absolutely everything we could to make sure she was healthy and before breeding any more litters. while most Thyroid issues don't come up until later, they can sometime be picked up on earlier through blood tests (just like in humans, sometimes there can be an underlying issue, but you're not symptomatic). Anyways, with that said, we chose to have her thyroid tested as well for good measure so to speak, and will continue to check it as she matures more.
 

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I know how they are tested LOL. My point is how can this reliable down the road? As my boy was diagnosed when he was 5 years old.
They're not part of the core clearances, but it's always nice to see a breeder making the effort. Certainly, the younger it's done in life, the less it tells you, but it's a smart thing to see that thyroid values are normal before breeding the dog. Like a CERF, you probably want to repeat it later in life, even after the dog is done with her breeding career, to see if any problems show up late.
 

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I noticed the heart clearance was from a practitioner as opposed to a cardiologist--are you going to "redo" that clearance? Also, was Molly & Sophie's sire's clearances ever completed? Just want to point out that its important to have generations of clearances behind the dogs being bred especially when Abby has Fair hips.

Now with three girls in your breeding program, are you going to pursue a venue to "prove" them (ex. agility, obedience, field, conformation). As your website points out that your breeding "quality" goldens, just wondering what the plans are (if any) to substantiate that statement. It's great that you're moving in the right direction with the clearances, I just hope you don't stop with the bare minimum.
 

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FYI A lot of thyroid problems are associated with early spay and neuter. A golden is 3 times as likely to be hypothyroid if they have been spayed or neutered before sexual maturity. Thus why breeders like to insist their puppies are not spayed or neutered before sexual maturity. A thyroid problem is not straight forward genetic, a LOT of it is associated with lifestyle, ie. being over weight, not having enough exercise, and being spayed and neutered too early. With that said it is a good step to test breeding stock before they are bred and should be repeated if there are any questionable symptoms.
 

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Wyatt Earp
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FYI A lot of thyroid problems are associated with early spay and neuter. A golden is 3 times as likely to be hypothyroid if they have been spayed or neutered before sexual maturity. Thus why breeders like to insist their puppies are not spayed or neutered before sexual maturity. A thyroid problem is not straight forward genetic, a LOT of it is associated with lifestyle, ie. being over weight, not having enough exercise, and being spayed and neutered too early. With that said it is a good step to test breeding stock before they are bred and should be repeated if there are any questionable symptoms.
Actually weight gain is a SYMPTOM of hypo thyroidism not a cause. Exercise has nothing to do with it. My boy Cody who was neutered at the age of 2 was diagnosed with hypothyroidism.
 
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