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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a 10-month old male Golden. He's absolutely incredible - so fun, playful, and loving. We are still in the process of training him not to pull on walks - it's definitely a work in progress because of all that puppy energy. He has a normal collar, a chain collar, and a harness that we switch up walking him with. He's still pulling a lot on walks, but SLOWLY getting better. Therefore, I'm afraid of using any type of collar on longer walks because I don't want him constantly pulling with his neck and putting pressure on his throat and trachea. BUT, the current harness we have also seems to put a little bit of pressure on his throat/trachea area as well. I can tell his breathing is a bit more labored when he pulls even on the harness. I've tried having the harness very tight and snug, and that doesn't work. I've tried having the harness really loose, and that also doesn't work. So, I need some recommendations of harnesses and/or collars that are good for a Golden and don't put so much pressure on his throat or trachea. Thanks.
 

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We love the Freedom No Pull Harness. It doesn’t go across the front legs but goes between the front legs so it does not interfere with his gait.

It is well made and has a leash that you can order with it if you want.

 

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At ten months old your dog should be trained to heel. Getting a harness will just make it more comfortable for him to pull.

So, I need recommendations for a harness that fits well on a Golden and isn't going to put pressure on his throat or trachea.
A dog trained to heel has zero pressure on his throat or trachea when on lead with a collar. The dog will also put zero pressure on your back, shoulder, arm, wrist..........
Work on training heel a couple tomes a day for 10-15 minutes. You will be amazed at the progress made in a week.
There are countless resources available to help you.
 

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There’s also a technique called the circle method, where, when the dog pulls, you guide him in a circle around your body before progressing forward again. Worth a try!
 

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We have been using a harness from "Two Hounds Design." This may be the case with other recommendations but there is a front clip in on the chest as well as a top clip in. They make a lead that allows for clipping into both rings. This is great for close quarters and also allows for turning your dog back toward you. It has been great for Oscar.

I see Kenmar also recommended this, above, so this is just another endorsement :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
At ten months old your dog should be trained to heel. Getting a harness will just make it more comfortable for him to pull.


A dog trained to heel has zero pressure on his throat or trachea when on lead with a collar. The dog will also put zero pressure on your back, shoulder, arm, wrist..........
Work on training heel a couple tomes a day for 10-15 minutes. You will be amazed at the progress made in a week.
There are countless resources available to help you.
Not looking for training tips. Just harness and/or collar recommendations! Thanks though!
 

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At ten months old your dog should be trained to heel. Getting a harness will just make it more comfortable for him to pull.


A dog trained to heel has zero pressure on his throat or trachea when on lead with a collar. The dog will also put zero pressure on your back, shoulder, arm, wrist..........
Work on training heel a couple tomes a day for 10-15 minutes. You will be amazed at the progress made in a week.
There are countless resources available to help you.
Agreed... our trainer emphasizes no pressure on lead early on and to only use a collar or slip lead to achieve... done correctly there is very little pressure on trachea.
 

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Harnesses will teach a dog to pull, not the other way around. And no-pull harness (the kind that attach in the front and twist the dog by pulling on their shoulder if they pull) have problems with causing shoulder injuries and gait problems. I tried the HALTI head harness on my Bear. It did not help. I tried the EASY WALK NO PULL HARNESS on my Bear and it did not help and instead just made him shut down and not walk at all. The only thing that got us over the pulling while walking was about a year of consistently working on it with a slip collar. Every time he pulled, I'd stop or walk the other way or do the circle method. It was a training issue that needed time and consistency to fix. Now with Lana and Molly we start right off the bat with teaching leash pressure so they have an automatic response to leash pressure. Instead of leaning into it (which is their body's natural reaction), they step back until the pressure is gone). It's done a world of good to help us get loose leash walking started right.
 

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Harnesses will teach a dog to pull, not the other way around. And no-pull harness (the kind that attach in the front and twist the dog by pulling on their shoulder if they pull) have problems with causing shoulder injuries and gait problems. I tried the HALTI head harness on my Bear. It did not help. I tried the EASY WALK NO PULL HARNESS on my Bear and it did not help and instead just made him shut down and not walk at all. The only thing that got us over the pulling while walking was about a year of consistently working on it with a slip collar. Every time he pulled, I'd stop or walk the other way or do the circle method. It was a training issue that needed time and consistency to fix. Now with Lana and Molly we start right off the bat with teaching leash pressure so they have an automatic response to leash pressure. Instead of leaning into it (which is their body's natural reaction), they step back until the pressure is gone). It's done a world of good to help us get loose leash walking started right.
That's funny... that my two previous female goldens learnt the loose leash right off the bat and my present male took some extra work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The lengths some people will go to to avoid training a dog is fascinating.
The lengths some people will go to be self-righteous and arrogant is fascinating. If you actually read my original post carefully and thoughtfully, you would have noticed that I mentioned that we are in the process of training him not to pull. If you have any leash, harness, or collar recommendations, I'm all for it. Many people in the comments have made recommendations regarding collars and harnesses. But I'm not interested in conceited comments from people like you ;)
 

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The lengths some people will go to be self-righteous and arrogant is fascinating. If you actually read my original post carefully and thoughtfully, you would have noticed that I mentioned that we are in the process of training him not to pull. If you have any leash, harness, or collar recommendations, I'm all for it. Many people in the comments have made recommendations regarding collars and harnesses. But I'm not interested in conceited comments from people like you ;)
At the risk of even more self righteousness and arrogance, I'll try again.
It is great that you are training your dog. The type of collar or harness is irrelevant.
Ten months old and still pulling on lead indicates a training problem. Unless the training was just started days ago something different needs to be done.
 

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I don’t recommend any harness. Regular ones encourage pulling. Anti-pull harnesses work by restricting a movement, which isn’t good for puppies. Head harnesses aren’t good for a puppy’s neck. Instead I recommend training, If the puppy pulls, stop. Gently guide them back to where you want them to be. Tell him/her how good they are and give a treat. Then move until they pull again. Repeat above. The puppy will stop pulling. There are several methods out there if you don’t like this one. Just choose what works best for you and stick with it. There are seldom times I recommend anything but a flat collar for a puppy. My criteria is if the handler is too weak, small, etc to handle the dog or the dog is completely out of hand. Then it’s only out of safety concerns for both.
 

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I don’t recommend any harness. Regular ones encourage pulling. Anti-pull harnesses work by restricting a movement, which isn’t good for puppies. Head harnesses aren’t good for a puppy’s neck. Instead I recommend training, If the puppy pulls, stop. Gently guide them back to where you want them to be. Tell him/her how good they are and give a treat. Then move until they pull again. Repeat above. The puppy will stop pulling. There are several methods out there if you don’t like this one. Just choose what works best for you and stick with it. There are seldom times I recommend anything but a flat collar for a puppy. My criteria is if the handler is too weak, small, etc to handle the dog or the dog is completely out of hand. Then it’s only out of safety concerns for both.
What would you recommend for an 8 month old male who is wicked strong and smart and backs out of flat collars immediately? We’ve been working on loose leash and heel since day 1 - every day - and it’s coming along, but still a work in progress and there are times when he spazzes out and starts zoomies and/or jumping and biting (I don’t need advice on how to stop that, I’m doing all the things I promise). I’m not sure how to keep him safe/controlled without something more than a flat collar, which I’m also worried will hurt his trachea. Would you suggest a prong at this point over a harness?
 

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What would you recommend for an 8 month old male who is wicked strong and smart and backs out of flat collars immediately? We’ve been working on loose leash and heel since day 1
I suggest taking a different approach in training. What you are doing is not working.
 

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What would you recommend for an 8 month old male who is wicked strong and smart and backs out of flat collars immediately? We’ve been working on loose leash and heel since day 1 - every day - and it’s coming along, but still a work in progress and there are times when he spazzes out and starts zoomies and/or jumping and biting (I don’t need advice on how to stop that, I’m doing all the things I promise). I’m not sure how to keep him safe/controlled without something more than a flat collar, which I’m also worried will hurt his trachea. Would you suggest a prong at this point over a harness?
He has learned that slipping out of a flat collar is rewarding. He can slip out and run where ever he wants. First things first, make sure the collar is tight enough. He shouldn't be able to get out of it unless his neck is bigger than his head. (Think sighthounds) Second, a Martingale collar might be a good place to start. They only slip to a limited size, which is small enough that they can't back out of it. They look like a flat collar with a loop that pulls tight. You need to have treats so good that he'll turn himself inside out for them. Hot dogs are usually a high value to any dog. Work on a few steps at a time. Definitely get into an obedience class. As SRW suggested, if the method you're using isn't working, try something else. I am not there to show you what kind of prong to buy. Definitely not the pet store kind! I'm also not there to teach you how to use it or to help you fit it properly. Look for a local dog training club. The instructors there are usually very knowledgeable and can help you with this problem.
 
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