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I met this guy at a dog park who has a 6 yrs old golden retriver and my pooch wanted to play with him so i chucked the ball so they can have fun together, and he told me that he is trying to limit the hard running for his golden because its bad for their joints and hip and they continue to run and play hard after the age of six...

Really?
 

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That's a bunch of hoooey unless the dog doesn't have a good structure to begin with. A 6 year old golden is in the prime of life!
 

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My Finn is 9, amd spends two hour stretches chasing birds through chest deep water!

 

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I met this guy at a dog park who has a 6 yrs old golden retriver and my pooch wanted to play with him so i chucked the ball so they can have fun together, and he told me that he is trying to limit the hard running for his golden because its bad for their joints and hip and they continue to run and play hard after the age of six...

Really?
We try limit the wear and tear on my girls joints (13yr old) for example when she accompanies us rock climbing we try not to allow her to jump down large distances (coming rock climbing involves her climbing up and down low grade climbs to access the bottom of the cliff) or she use to run (while I cycled) to the gym (10 km round trip) twice a week, now she runs with me no more than 1km down to local shop maybe once a week. She now comes come cycle touring, but runs until she starts to slow down then just rides in her doggie
trailer like a madam! I must say sasha still exercises a couple hours a day.

I think looking after our pups is vital, however I think what this guy is not understand is that a happy pup is a healthy pup! I think being over protective of a dog by not allowing them to live and enjoy the simple pleasures is in my opinion detrimental to health!

However it's not for me to judge, who knows what this guys situation is. Maybe his previous dog died prematurely or suffered poor health and he really doesn't want his dog to go through any health issues.
 

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I met this guy at a dog park who has a 6 yrs old golden retriver and my pooch wanted to play with him so i chucked the ball so they can have fun together, and he told me that he is trying to limit the hard running for his golden because its bad for their joints and hip and they continue to run and play hard after the age of six...

Really?
Could he have been talking about his animal, in particular? i.e. It has HD, arthritis, etc.? If not...I'm with everyone else.

Butter has HD, so that's something I would definitely be concerned with by the time he's six (the vet said to expect it to get progressively worse).
 

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Could he have been talking about his animal, in particular? i.e. It has HD, arthritis, etc.? If not...I'm with everyone else.

Butter has HD, so that's something I would definitely be concerned with by the time he's six (the vet said to expect it to get progressively worse).
But even arthritis doesn't exactly mean the dog is hobbled for his adult and senior years... :confused:

My guy Danny had bilateral elbow dysplasia - to the extent that our vet who took a peek at his elbows when he was 3 or 4 was appalled by what she saw. She said it was the worst case she'd ever seen. When he was a puppy they couldn't even see anything because of the cloud of inflamation.

This just meant that he had his various pain meds and supplements to get the inflamation and keep him comfortable.

That dog was still running around the yard and was a flight risk until he was 5 or 6. He could run like the wind, gimpy or not. And he even got to play in agility for a short while and our instructor encouraged us to consider getting him into trials with him and his 7 year old brother.

His elbows were the reason I decided to retire him from climbing A-frames and teeters, but he still was an active dog for a few years beyond that.

Discussing dysplasia with my vet last year - her advice is to let the dog do what he wants and not to pull back unless the dog lets them know (hesitation, avoidance, stiffeness or weakness afterwards, etc).
 

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But even arthritis doesn't exactly mean the dog is hobbled for his adult and senior years... :confused:

My guy Danny had bilateral elbow dysplasia - to the extent that our vet who took a peek at his elbows when he was 3 or 4 was appalled by what she saw. She said it was the worst case she'd ever seen. When he was a puppy they couldn't even see anything because of the cloud of inflamation.

This just meant that he had his various pain meds and supplements to get the inflamation and keep him comfortable.

That dog was still running around the yard and was a flight risk until he was 5 or 6. He could run like the wind, gimpy or not. And he even got to play in agility for a short while and our instructor encouraged us to consider getting him into trials with him and his 7 year old brother.

His elbows were the reason I decided to retire him from climbing A-frames and teeters, but he still was an active dog for a few years beyond that.

Discussing dysplasia with my vet last year - her advice is to let the dog do what he wants and not to pull back unless the dog lets them know (hesitation, avoidance, stiffeness or weakness afterwards, etc).
Yup. I'm assuming that the guy is overprotective.

He could be one of those people that "read one time on the internets" that it's bad to let your dog run after age six. That's one problem with the amount of information floating around out there...you have to be able to filter out the good from the bad.

Same here. I walk him and head back to the house when he starts to head that direction (he'll turn around on his own). He wouldn't fetch for almost three months. I don't throw him a ball unless it looks like he's really in the mood. Giving his leg some time to heal (he had a soft tissue injury, as well) has been good for him. I need to get him swimming down at the river next summer. I just didn't have the time to do it this year.
 

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I guess I would have asked him to explain himself. Maybe he had a dog that had HD and it got so bad that he had to pts the dog so with this one he is being more careful. I dont know just throwing around thoughts.

I know that I am more careful with BaWaaJige because of DaVinci's HD. I have not let Jige do any jumping yet like DaVinci did. I know that Jige has good hips in his pedigree and with DaVinci (4wk old pup along side the road) I didnt but I am still more careful. This guy could be the same way.
 

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I think that's a little mental, unless the dog has pre-existing problems.

I will say that I don't force my dogs pace on a leash for long distances (like running together in the neighborhood), and I don't run them on pavement. I'm also aware that the working drive in many Goldens will sometimes keep them from acknowledging pain until well after they ought to, so I'm careful not to let them overexercise themselves when fetching. I think those are sensible precautions.

But, activity is generally good for well-formed joints, and well-developed muscles cut down on joint strain. Underexercising your dog is probably a lot more dangerous for his health than even heavy exercise, so long as you don't force the dog to overdo it (or allow him to overdo it because he's a knucklehead when in working mode).
 

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I would think it would depend on the dog... just as some young people get arthritis at a very early age... myself... and other people at 80 years young have no arthritis. You just have to know your dog.
 

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But, activity is generally good for well-formed joints, and well-developed muscles cut down on joint strain. Underexercising your dog is probably a lot more dangerous for his health than even heavy exercise, so long as you don't force the dog to overdo it (or allow him to overdo it because he's a knucklehead when in working mode).
I was thinking the same thing. I think too little exercise can be just as bad, if not worse, for a healthy, structurally sound dog. Regardless of age.

I'm glad that nobody told our Cooper he couldn't run around after he turned six. He'd still get the zoomies at the age of 11. He never really got the concept of fetching. The way he saw it, he wasn't here to do things for us, or to amuse us -- he'd run for the joy of it, when he felt like doing it. He was overweight, had mild arthritis and would still tear up the back yard with the best of 'em. I never imposed limits on him. I learned that I could let him decide what he felt like doing. If he felt like running, he would. If he didn't, he wouldn't.
 

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My Laney had unilateral mild hip dysplasia and was still jumping in the Rally Ring two weeks before she died with a ruptured splenic hemangiosarcoma. I did had to limit retrieving as she would jam on her front legs and it seemed that that was never good for her.
 

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Don't tell that to my girl!! :)

I don't think one can make such a generalizing statement about all dogs. Size, health, etc all play a part. Personally, I believe that exercise is GOOD for the joints. If a dog doesn't get any exercise after the age of six, I'd expect it would become more stiff and out of shape, just as would happen with humans.

My dog has arthritis and has always had stiffer than normal joints (from a very young age). But at 11, on a good supplement and a good painkiller, she still LOVES to play ball more than anything. She ran at full force until I curbed it about one year ago (when the arthritis developed). Now, she no longer gets big Chuk-It throws, but she still gets to play ball everyday, and go for hikes and go swimming - just for shorter periods of time. But I know that it's what keeps her healthy and happiest.
 

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The only way I'd limit my guy's exercise, absent other diseases or injuries, is if a veterinarian treating my dog tells me to do so. Toby is on a no-exercise instruction this week, but that's due to his recent cataract removal surgery. I'm sure as soon as he gets the a-ok he'll want to run like the wind again.
 

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I do think it's important to reiterate that you do need to set boundaries for your dogs sometimes. Their faithfulness to stay with you and their working drive to retrieve can push them to ignore pain. Having had dog give themselves (fortunately minor) injuries from pushing too hard, I do think you need to step in some times with some dogs.
 

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The point is the guy was at a DOG PARK and running around chasing balls is what most dogs do at dog parks. If he didn't want his 6 year old golden running around chasing balls perhaps another venue might be in order for the dog and perhaps the dog should be on leash.
 

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Okay, a more serious answer from me.

I did have a golden (King) who had mild dysplasia and when he got to be about 12, he needed some pain relief. However, he restricted his own activity as needed, he was always allowed to run and play as hard as he liked - he was hiking the day he fell over, then wouldn't eat, and then had to be brought to the E Vet - surgery found his liver destroyed by cancer but he was 14 1/2 and still active.

Same with my Rowdy - around 11, he started needing occasional pain meds and developed arthritis. He too hiked, biked and played daily. He lived to be 12 1/2 and still played hard most days (some days he kept quieter due to his Larangeal Paralysis issues)

Casey is now 10 1/2, and was an agility competitor. He still goes to classes, still takes hikes and bike rides, still plays with Ms Towhee hard (not allowed to play with Faelan since they overdo it and get into fights). He also still practices obedience. He has Metacam as needed, but I usually re-order every 6 months with 1/2 to 3/4 still remaining.

I remember my vet telling me when we found out that King had dysplasia (2 year clearance Xrays), that it would be very important to keep him lean, well muscled and not to limit or restrict exercise.

If you dog has issues, you might need to limit exercise but to state that no golden should not have heavy exercise after 6? That is just not right.
 
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