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Discussion Starter #1
? I've noticed people with kids occasionally commenting that raising a golden puppy was (or would be) good prep for raising a human baby so I'm curious about people's experiences/perceptions with the differences and similarities of raising a baby golden vs a baby human. My golden had multiple bouts with giardia so we had a lot (cumulatively months) of getting up 3-6 times a night with her. So to me the process seemed quite similar to how I imagine raising an infant might be. But I only have fur babies so I have no clue. I'm curious to see how others think it compares.
 

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Interesting question. The first thing that came to mind is you can stick a puppy in the crate and leave for a bit of a break which you cannot get with a baby unless you have another person to help. Getting up at night to fed a baby takes longer than taking a puppy out. Babies get up at night for months, most puppies only a few weeks. Babies are more physically tiring since they have to be carried and fed for months so overall I think babies are harder but, as much as I love my dogs and think of them like my kids, there is really no comparison to how much I love and enjoy my human children. I'm also a little surprised but not unhappy that I'm still doing a few things to help out my human children who are 25 and 28.
 

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Interesting question. The first thing that came to mind is you can stick a puppy in the crate and leave for a bit of a break which you cannot get with a baby unless you have another person to help. Getting up at night to fed a baby takes longer than taking a puppy out. Babies get up at night for months, most puppies only a few weeks. Babies are more physically tiring since they have to be carried and fed for months so overall I think babies are harder but, as much as I love my dogs and think of them like my kids, there is really no comparison to how much I love and enjoy my human children. I'm also a little surprised but not unhappy that I'm still doing a few things to help out my human children who are 25 and 28.
That all sounds very true. Good points. Lol. I held my friend's 12lb newborn for a couple hours the other day and was surprised that my arm was a bit sore the next day lol. I hadn't thought about the fact that getting up to feed a baby takes a whole lot longer than bringing a dog out.. it doesn't involve freezing cold temperatures so it's got that going for it but it's much more time awake. Interesting.
 

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I have raised two golden puppies so far and one son who is currently 3 and I am pregnant with twins girls. The goldens were hands down easier. And my son has been an extremely easy child, but the dogs are just easier. (Then again, I have never been a fan of the infant stage and have enjoyed my son much more in the toddler stage. Infant stage is just really stressful and scary to me!) The dogs were both 100% reliable in the house by 6 months old and pretty well versed in obedience and manners by then too. My 3 year old is still working on the potty thing, manners, and obedience. And I imagine it will be something he has to keep learning until he grows up and moves out. With the twins coming-let’s just say right now I feel like it would be easier to raise a litter of 12 goldens! We will see how it goes once they get here I guess!
 

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Gratefully I was blessed with both really good babies and puppies... although the babies didn't bite! But then I go back to the days when there were no daycares for babies under 3. It's easier when both pups & kids are your main focus. I might remember it differently if I had a job outside the home. LOL it was much easier to potty train the dogs than the kids!
 

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I have raised two golden puppies so far and one son who is currently 3 and I am pregnant with twins girls. The goldens were hands down easier. And my son has been an extremely easy child, but the dogs are just easier. (Then again, I have never been a fan of the infant stage and have enjoyed my son much more in the toddler stage. Infant stage is just really stressful and scary to me!) The dogs were both 100% reliable in the house by 6 months old and pretty well versed in obedience and manners by then too. My 3 year old is still working on the potty thing, manners, and obedience. And I imagine it will be something he has to keep learning until he grows up and moves out. With the twins coming-let’s just say right now I feel like it would be easier to raise a litter of 12 goldens! We will see how it goes once they get here I guess!
Ha! Right. We're a lot slower to pick up on things like manners... I'm still working on that myself.
 

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We have raised three kids and have had over 7 dogs! This question is no contest....human babies are much more difficult... and you are talking a minimum of 18 years that can be expensive and challenging, some more than others...

But, I do not regret any of it and would do it over again in a minute! Our life reward for all this hard work with our kids is they have blessed us with Six Grandchildren...and they are perfect kids! From a Grandfather's perspective...
 

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Oh, gosh, hands down, no contest, the Golden pups have been a walk in the park compared to raising a child! And my kid has been relatively easy ... There is absolutely no comparison in my opinion. Raising a child is not even in the same universe as raising a pup, in terms of difficulty.

Potty training: 3 months for the dog, 4 years for the kid. Sleeping through the night: 4 weeks for the dog, 6 years for the kid (night terrors). Financial input: For the dog: vet visits, preventive care, food, toys and accessories, training. Probably $3000 per year for (hopefully) 12 years. For the kid: health care is free, but education, clothing, food, transportation to and from school, computer and accessories, and all the indirect costs such as the need for a bigger car, a house with an additional bedroom, etc., probably adds up to at least five times that amount for the first 18 years (if not more) and in our case longer because she's going to university next year. Training and livability: When you get a dog, you can go to a great breeder and ask for exactly the kind of dog you want in terms of temperament and trainability, meaning that if you put in the groundwork for a year or two, you'll quickly end up with a dog that's easy to live with. When you have or adopt a kid, you don't know what you're going to get, it takes a whole lot longer than a couple of years to instill basic manners and good values, and your life will be built around his or her education for at least two decades.

I love my kid and all the effort has been more than worthwhile. She will be an amazing human being and I consider her to be my greatest achievement in life. I would not, for any consideration, have missed the experience of being a parent. But I would raise 50 more Golden pups before I would raise another child.
 

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Lol, I love all these responses! I do want to be clear in case anyone's worried that I'm completely delusional about child rearing - the title question was really meant tongue in cheek. I also thought it might get a few more people to actually open and read the thread. ? But I am genuinely interested in hearing about how much more difficult the infant stage is compared to a needy pup.

And I will continue to be grateful that Luna's Liberal Arts degree isn't going to cost me 100k and I don't have to worry about her constant eyeing of the boy pup next door. ;)
 

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Potty training: 3 months for the dog, 4 years for the kid. Sleeping through the night: 4 weeks for the dog, 6 years for the kid (night terrors).

But I would raise 50 more Golden pups before I would raise another child.
Omg, genuine LOL on this. I think that perfectly sums it up.
 

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I'm going to expand beyond the baby phase and point out that not once have I ever had to sit in a pick up or drop off line while taking my Golden Retriever to classes. You don't even want to hear the horror stories I have experienced and witnessed in the school drop off and pick up lines that I must endure for my kids.
 
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