Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner
61 - 80 of 94 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
582 Posts
While I understand this is the case in many areas of the country, there are others (like New England) where spay/neuter is common and most of our shelters and rescue groups (even those based in large urban areas) are largely empty except for dogs brought up from southern rescues. And most of the dogs coming up from the south are either pit mixes or hounds - not particularly popular breeds here and not a good substitute for someone who might have their heart set on, say, a Golden Retriever, or a retriever mix, or a small dog (especially a small dog that isn't a chihuahua, which seems to be all that's available from the rescues that specialize in the smaller dogs). Because most of the dogs are coming up from the South, many rescues expect you to commit to a dog without even having met it! Here in the northeast, dogs that aren't pit mixes (and who don't have the "no other pets, no kids, has separation anxiety" type issues) fly out of our shelters and rescues before most people even know they are there.

When I lost my last golden to cancer I did some soul searching about whether I was ready to do another Golden and spent 6 months monitoring local shelters and rescue groups for a dog that might be what I wanted and needed (youngish, good with my other dogs and my cats, some potential to do a dog sport - and I wanted to be able to meet the dog before making a commitment!). In that time, I only found 3 dogs that might fit the bill: two already had a multi-person waitlist by the time I applied, and the one that we were first on the list for ended up not being a good fit.

Years ago, I was an active member of YGRR and did a lot of home visits for them. Every home I checked was awesome, BUT YGRR had so few dogs that the wait (especially for young family dogs without significant health or behavioral issues) could be years, even for a great potential home. In the last few years Yankee started accepting Golden mixes and bringing dogs in from places like Turkey because the demand was so high and the supply was so low. I know this isn't the case everywhere, but I'm in full sympathy with rescues like YGRR bringing in dogs from overseas, especially if they are working with groups that can be fairly confidently confirmed to be actually rescuing and not breeding for the lack of Goldens in the US.
Yep many of the dogs around me are brought in from out of state too. Which I also don’t agree with because they are often crammed into vans or trailers in a way in which they would be hollering abuse if anyone else did it. Plus there is still sometimes the issue of non-vaccinated dogs being transported.

While I understand what you're saying, and I am fully aware that the south supplies a lot of rescue dogs (of generally less desirable breed combos) there is still, in my opinion, no circumstance currently under which we should be importing dogs to "rescue." If a person very much wants to rescue, then they should work with what is available here in the US. If they want a specific breed and can't find one to rescue, then they should do what is probably the best thing anyway, which is get on a list with a reputable breeder and purchase a quality, well bred dog of the breed they desire. Again, I feel very much for dogs in other countries that need help too, but we need to mop up our own mess before we get involved in anyone else's. That means we need to do the hard things, like euthanizing dogs that are not likely to find homes for whatever reason (instead of trying to ship them north where they aren't terribly wanted either), and instead of putting money into importing foreign strays, we put the money into even more low cost or free spay/neuter clinics (especially in the south), and put money towards round up programs to capture and either alter or euthanize feral or stray/roaming populations to stop the constant flow of puppies (and kittens) into shelters or on the streets. We can also use the money to improve the situation in shelters here, maybe pay the staff a living wage, and fund better care for the US dogs waiting for homes.
Totally agree! And it is so hard to look especially at those Turkey or China goldens in need and not want to help them. But I must think with my mind and not my emotions!

Some of this is already done, we have a million low cost or free spay neuter clinics in the south. Literally TONS. And we also do a lot of euthanasias for dogs that don’t get adopted. When I lived in central Florida, I lived right next to a high volume discount spay neuter clinic that happened to be right next to animal control. The local SPCA pulled dogs from AC and whatever didn’t get pulled was euthanized.

But I do think that most people that the ever increasing price tag of well-bred Goldens is a huge deterrent. So that leaves people with rescue or to support less than reputable breeders. It’s like the lesser of two evils.
I have no qualms with rescue and as long as it’s all done legally and with the proper channels, it’s only a win win situation. People get a dog they want and a dog gets a home. I don’t agree with supporting foreign breeders under the guise of saving dogs from the meat trade, but I do believe their is a place for rescue and families that want to rescue for whatever their reasons may be.
Yes the increasing price of goldens is pricing them out of great families, I agree. But my very unpopular opinion is that this is where there is actually a need for-I don’t know what to call them-mid-class? breeders. You know, the ones who have nice tempered dogs that they love and take care of, but they maybe don’t do all the OFA’s and stuff. The breeders who will admit they don’t do the testing and charge appropriate prices for that lack-like maybe the 1-2 thousand range. Good breeders simply can’t meet demand. Period. Another unpopular opinion is that good breeders should maybe consider breeding more litters. But adopt don’t shop and animal rights has caused everyone to go on the defensive and try to appease them (which, I don’t know why one would bother, because they will never be appeased-particularly the animal rights people who want to see the end of pet ownership. Anyone who ever even thinks about breeding a dog is generally thought of as evil in their eyes. But I get it, criticism can be tough to take even when you know that you are doing right by your dogs and the breed.) The fact is, these rescues started with the goal of being able to be put out of business because there weren’t enough dogs to rescue. That time has come, but instead they are seeking dogs from elsewhere. The truth is, we actually have a shortage of dogs in the US. A statistic I read (I think from National Animal Interest Alliance) was that over 80% of our dogs are neutered/spayed. So only 20% are left in tact for breeding and of those not all are being bred because of the UC Davis study on the effects of neutering. We buy 8 million dogs each year. Approximately 2 million come from shelters. Over 1 million come from overseas. The rest come from breeders. But according to this article we have about a million dog shortage. Many of the dogs in shelters cannot be safely placed in homes. So they continue to sit in a cage at the shelter. I think that is inhumane-better to euthanize than live a miserable life in a cage. The dogs of desirable breed mixes and temperaments get snatched up. Leaving less desirable temperatures that often get placed in homes unsuited for them and then you have the attacks happen. So because of the shortage of dogs + the guilt tripping adopt don’t shop crowd, people wind up with dogs they should never have. I think foreign imports are too risky, so that is why my opinion is that good breeders should breed more and mid class breeders should not be written off. Here is a link to an article from a couple years ago about the issue: https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http...H4mkxySYUTjXaZYmkj77681pDDu415TYKXIKM-2T2&s=1
 

· Registered
Joined
·
820 Posts
While I understand this is the case in many areas of the country, there are others (like New England) where spay/neuter is common and most of our shelters and rescue groups (even those based in large urban areas) are largely empty except for dogs brought up from southern rescues. And most of the dogs coming up from the south are either pit mixes or hounds - not particularly popular breeds here and not a good substitute for someone who might have their heart set on, say, a Golden Retriever, or a retriever mix, or a small dog (especially a small dog that isn't a chihuahua, which seems to be all that's available from the rescues that specialize in the smaller dogs). Because most of the dogs are coming up from the South, many rescues expect you to commit to a dog without even having met it! Here in the northeast, dogs that aren't pit mixes (and who don't have the "no other pets, no kids, has separation anxiety" type issues) fly out of our shelters and rescues before most people even know they are there.

When I lost my last golden to cancer I did some soul searching about whether I was ready to do another Golden and spent 6 months monitoring local shelters and rescue groups for a dog that might be what I wanted and needed (youngish, good with my other dogs and my cats, some potential to do a dog sport - and I wanted to be able to meet the dog before making a commitment!). In that time, I only found 3 dogs that might fit the bill: two already had a multi-person waitlist by the time I applied, and the one that we were first on the list for ended up not being a good fit.

Years ago, I was an active member of YGRR and did a lot of home visits for them. Every home I checked was awesome, BUT YGRR had so few dogs that the wait (especially for young family dogs without significant health or behavioral issues) could be years, even for a great potential home. In the last few years Yankee started accepting Golden mixes and bringing dogs in from places like Turkey because the demand was so high and the supply was so low. I know this isn't the case everywhere, but I'm in full sympathy with rescues like YGRR bringing in dogs from overseas, especially if they are working with groups that can be fairly confidently confirmed to be actually rescuing and not breeding for the lack of Goldens in the US.
Thank you for the input . Paws New England ( a mixed breed rescue) is a great rescue aswell and as you mentioned their dogs may not be fit for every family or if they are, they are so few.
 

· Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,458 Posts
Yep many of the dogs around me are brought in from out of state too. Which I also don’t agree with because they are often crammed into vans or trailers in a way in which they would be hollering abuse if anyone else did it. Plus there is still sometimes the issue of non-vaccinated dogs being transported.


Totally agree! And it is so hard to look especially at those Turkey or China goldens in need and not want to help them. But I must think with my mind and not my emotions!


Yes the increasing price of goldens is pricing them out of great families, I agree. But my very unpopular opinion is that this is where there is actually a need for-I don’t know what to call them-mid-class? breeders. You know, the ones who have nice tempered dogs that they love and take care of, but they maybe don’t do all the OFA’s and stuff. The breeders who will admit they don’t do the testing and charge appropriate prices for that lack-like maybe the 1-2 thousand range. Good breeders simply can’t meet demand. Period. Another unpopular opinion is that good breeders should maybe consider breeding more litters. But adopt don’t shop and animal rights has caused everyone to go on the defensive and try to appease them (which, I don’t know why one would bother, because they will never be appeased-particularly the animal rights people who want to see the end of pet ownership. Anyone who ever even thinks about breeding a dog is generally thought of as evil in their eyes. But I get it, criticism can be tough to take even when you know that you are doing right by your dogs and the breed.) The fact is, these rescues started with the goal of being able to be put out of business because there weren’t enough dogs to rescue. That time has come, but instead they are seeking dogs from elsewhere. The truth is, we actually have a shortage of dogs in the US. A statistic I read (I think from National Animal Interest Alliance) was that over 80% of our dogs are neutered/spayed. So only 20% are left in tact for breeding and of those not all are being bred because of the UC Davis study on the effects of neutering. We buy 8 million dogs each year. Approximately 2 million come from shelters. Over 1 million come from overseas. The rest come from breeders. But according to this article we have about a million dog shortage. Many of the dogs in shelters cannot be safely placed in homes. So they continue to sit in a cage at the shelter. I think that is inhumane-better to euthanize than live a miserable life in a cage. The dogs of desirable breed mixes and temperaments get snatched up. Leaving less desirable temperatures that often get placed in homes unsuited for them and then you have the attacks happen. So because of the shortage of dogs + the guilt tripping adopt don’t shop crowd, people wind up with dogs they should never have. I think foreign imports are too risky, so that is why my opinion is that good breeders should breed more and mid class breeders should not be written off. Here is a link to an article from a couple years ago about the issue: https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https://todaysveterinarybusiness.com/the-dog-shortage-is-real/?fbclid=IwAR1pcRkGtGfzgBwhprs0uoRfhXfGF6fpKbS4K199GnbV3mYFJ_v_tIkYbA0&h=AT3LdzIQPYbMfUD9vKNc7zsAayKNq8J3oLfn1LJVH8NMZrpLv-z-EqvVaUEPUSexn-2wGnu-ayBqn4gFiK8H4mkxySYUTjXaZYmkj77681pDDu415TYKXIKM-2T2&s=1
I dont know if this is necessarily an unpopular opinion, but one that can not be easily…”enforced”? Who among us will encourage someone (their friend, family, etc) will encourage someone to spend 1.5k on a dog with minimal health testing versus pushing them to save 4.5k to save for the well bred dog.
We all have ideals and hope that people are able to achieve their dream of having a well bred purebred, but that’s not a reality for everyone. On top of that, we discourage anyone who might want to pursue a more affordable breeder
 

· Registered
Ramses, golden retriever bred in France 😆
Joined
·
762 Posts
A question out of curiosity and possibly stupid so forgive me on that. I would hope someone could educate me on this... Are there golden retriever breeders who do health testing (hips, elbows, eyes, heart) but perhaps don't participate in competitions/have no titled dogs - show, field, obedience etc...? And if there are such breeders, how do we categorize them? Good, bad..?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,147 Posts
But my very unpopular opinion is that this is where there is actually a need for-I don’t know what to call them-mid-class? breeders. You know, the ones who have nice tempered dogs that they love and take care of, but they maybe don’t do all the OFA’s and stuff. The breeders who will admit they don’t do the testing and charge appropriate prices for that lack-like maybe the 1-2 thousand range. Good breeders simply can’t meet demand. Period. Another unpopular opinion is that good breeders should maybe consider breeding more litters. But adopt don’t shop and animal rights has caused everyone to go on the defensive and try to appease them (which, I don’t know why one would bother, because they will never be appeased-particularly the animal rights people who want to see the end of pet ownership. Anyone who ever even thinks about breeding a dog is generally thought of as evil in their eyes. But I get it, criticism can be tough to take even when you know that you are doing right by your dogs and the breed.) The fact is, these rescues started with the goal of being able to be put out of business because there weren’t enough dogs to rescue. That time has come, but instead they are seeking dogs from elsewhere. The truth is, we actually have a shortage of dogs in the US. A statistic I read (I think from National Animal Interest Alliance) was that over 80% of our dogs are neutered/spayed. So only 20% are left in tact for breeding and of those not all are being bred because of the UC Davis study on the effects of neutering. We buy 8 million dogs each year. Approximately 2 million come from shelters. Over 1 million come from overseas. The rest come from breeders. But according to this article we have about a million dog shortage. Many of the dogs in shelters cannot be safely placed in homes. So they continue to sit in a cage at the shelter. I think that is inhumane-better to euthanize than live a miserable life in a cage. The dogs of desirable breed mixes and temperaments get snatched up. Leaving less desirable temperatures that often get placed in homes unsuited for them and then you have the attacks happen. So because of the shortage of dogs + the guilt tripping adopt don’t shop crowd, people wind up with dogs they should never have. I think foreign imports are too risky, so that is why my opinion is that good breeders should breed more and mid class breeders should not be written off.
I can't get behind this and I'll explain why. (I know it will vary greatly due to location but lets say it's $1000 to fully health test a dog.)
I am not against what I would call "ethical backyard breeders." By that I mean these people don't do anything with their dogs, or maybe just get a CGC, but they fully health test them. If they can't invest even that much into their dogs, then they can't afford to breed because there are additional costs to breeding such as x rays, food changes/increases etc, the sort of things a BYB might be willing to do. We all know that even an ethical BYB isn't likely to go out and buy a dura whelp box, tube feeding supplies and such. The mom is going to deliver in their last kid's pack n' play or a plywood square or something similar they already have in a garage on a pile of old towels or blankets. They aren't likely to have to pay a stud fee because they probably own both parents or they made a deal with Bob next door that his dog can breed with their dog and Bob gets a puppy.
Now there is always the possibility that the female will require a c section or other expensive treatments. If they can't put $1000 into health testing, how will they cover that? They're not likely to have pet insurance, let alone insurance with a breeding rider on it. What if the puppies get sick? A whole litter of sick pups won't be cheap either. So if you can't afford health testing, how would you pay for all of that?
So if a person is willing to health test their dogs, even if they do nothing with them, I'm not offended by them breeding and supplying pets to the market at a price that matches their effort, not priced like a titled dog would be. But I'm not ok with untested dogs breeding.
I left the pet groups on FB because I saw near daily posts of "why does my dog have massive dandruff" (ichthyosis). NCL is a death sentence, and without testing you could easily put 2 carriers together. So many "my dog is limping but I can't afford to take him to the vet to check for hip/elbow dysplasia" posts. There are entire groups for people to go and beg for money or post their go fund me link because their dog needs surgery for dysplasia etc. I can't support churning out those puppies just because people want a cheap golden, because the buyers often can't or won't pay for the proper treatments when the issues happen and the dogs suffer for it. The health testing needs to happen.



I dont know if this is necessarily an unpopular opinion, but one that can not be easily…”enforced”? Who among us will encourage someone (their friend, family, etc) will encourage someone to spend 1.5k on a dog with minimal health testing versus pushing them to save 4.5k to save for the well bred dog.
We all have ideals and hope that people are able to achieve their dream of having a well bred purebred, but that’s not a reality for everyone. On top of that, we discourage anyone who might want to pursue a more affordable breeder.
That should stop. If they want to go to an ethical BYB (does health testing and nothing else) and pay $1500 for a puppy, we should be fine with that. However if the eBYB is charging $2500/3000 that is where I'd say "you can do better for that price."

A question out of curiosity and possibly stupid so forgive me on that. I would hope someone could educate me on this... Are there golden retriever breeders who do health testing (hips, elbows, eyes, heart) but perhaps don't participate in competitions/have no titled dogs - show, field, obedience etc...? And if there are such breeders, how do we categorize them? Good, bad..?
There are breeders like that, again what I'd call an ethical backyard breeder, and they are mostly "good" in my opinion because they provide puppies to the market that are at low risk of health issues. My only real concern is that they will sell them to unethical BYBs, maybe not on purpose, but it's likely to happen.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,695 Posts
Yes, there are lots but given the situation we either need more or we need more funds to make them free instead of low cost.


No argument from me that the price tag on Goldens is a potential problem, and bybs are a huge issue as well. But none of that changes the fact that I believe we need to fix our own issues before we import someone else's.

I'm not trying to change anyone's mind, I'm just sharing my opinion.
As an adopter of two YGRR dogs, Sani who came to us as a hospice girl, and Oscar who we have had for 6 years and is now struggling with a diagnosis of a nerve sheath tumor, I would suggest that it is not about the country, it is about the dog. If we can save the life of a golden (and YGRR is primarily a YGRR-specific rescue), then that is what we should be doing. YGRR does not turn away domestic dogs in order to save overseas dogs so it addresses the domestic side of the problem; as long as YGRR is made aware of dogs in need or they are surrendered. Why shouldn't we be doing both? Countries such as Turkey, China, and Egypt do not see street dogs as being a problem so they do nothing to help them. We discovered when working through Oscar's diagnosis that he had a healed broken rib. It deeply saddened us to think about how that occurred when he was a street dog in Turkey. I have had 4 goldens since 1981 and felt blessed to share our lives with them whether they have come from the streets of Istanbul or a breeder in the United States. Where they are from is not the issue. It is saving them and loving them for the duration of their lives that is important.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Discussion Starter · #70 ·
Americans want to “rescue” to feel good about themselves and about “saving a dog in need of a home” but want to also have a purebred dog for aesthetics and temperament and likely because domestic shelters are FULL of bully mixes that are not desirable. That’s where retail rescue fills that need.

Rescues buy purebred dogs from overseas puppy mills, advertise them as being saved from the meat trade (appeal to peoples need to save animals) and adopt them out for extremely high prices. The rescues make money, the buyers are willing to pay to “rescue” a dog but still get the breed they want. In 2019 or 2020…can’t remember exactly, the US imported something like 1 million dogs — a HIGHLY unregulated process BTW. Yet animal rights activists claim we have an overpopulation problem here.
Please don't take this wrong; I'm not trying to start an argument here, but I just want to honestly ask...Do you think animal shelter staff are stupid enough to place dogs up for adoption that were at high risk of mauling a human?
 

· Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,458 Posts
Please don't take this wrong; I'm not trying to start an argument here, but I just want to honestly ask...Do you think animal shelter staff are stupid enough to place dogs up for adoption that were at high risk of mauling a human?
Not true shelters as much, but rescues do this on a not insignificant basis
 

· Registered
Joined
·
582 Posts
Please don't take this wrong; I'm not trying to start an argument here, but I just want to honestly ask...Do you think animal shelter staff are stupid enough to place dogs up for adoption that were at high risk of mauling a human?
Yes and no. There have been cases where dogs with known, recorded bite histories were adopted out to families and those families were straight up lied to about the dog’s history. Until someone got hurt and a deeper investigation ensued. I think there are absolutely retail rescues who will hide bite histories or the aggressive tendencies they have seen in the dogs just to sell them. I also think there are a lot of rescues who assume that a dog is fine because they haven’t seen it do anything too bad yet (lack of dog body language skills). Or the dog is young and true temperament hasn’t “set in” yet. Unknown backgrounds are risky and in breeds that have a history of aggression (pit bulls were not nanny dogs; they originate from bull fighting dogs. They were then bred for dog fighting once bull fighting was outlawed. So purposely bred for animal aggression. American Staffordshire Terrier History: How the AmStaff Separated From the "Pit Bull" – American Kennel Club. Nanny dogs is a myth made up by people trying to reverse stigma against pits.) Shelters should do better about being truthful. (Contrary to popular myth, temperament is absolutely genetic and not “all in how they are raised”). So basically, no because I think some are just plain ignorant because of the widely believed myths being spread (and probably a lack of basic dog body language knowledge); and yes because I also think some/many are just plain deceptive.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Sankari

· Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
GRCA POSITION STATEMENT ON RESCUE IMPORTATION

The GRCA has long been an advocate of rescuing purebred Golden Retrievers. When formal breed rescues developed, the hope was always that someday rescue would no longer be necessary. Due to the promotion of responsible breeding practices and the efficiency of breed-specific rescue, the last decade has seen a steady decline in Goldens in need of rescue.

Faced with not enough dogs for available homes, Golden rescues began admitting Golden Retriever crosses and dogs from other parts of the country. As the number of Goldens requiring rescue continued to dwindle, some of the rescue groups operating under the auspices of GRCA's National Rescue Committee began actively importing dogs from countries with health standards not equivalent to our own. This is a trend among many rescue groups, not just those focused on Goldens.

Rabies, brucellosis, canine influenza, leptospirosis and other diseases have all entered the U.S. as a result of incomplete vetting, questionable documentation, lack of quarantine and acceptance of dogs with unknown histories. In addition, some dogs with poor temperaments have been imported. These practices place our resident dogs and volunteers at risk.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has released a key report finding that over a million dogs are imported into the U.S. each year. Less than one percent are subject to thorough health screenings that ensure they are healthy and free of disease before entering the U.S. This report represents a critical first step in the process to update the current statutory and regulatory framework for dog imports to ensure animal and public health is protected.

Diseased dogs post multiple threats:
to the imported dog
to the volunteers and veterinarians who come into contact with those infected dog
to the other dogs currently at the facility
to the other dogs in the community
to the public in the community
to the other animals in the ecosystem


The GRCA views this as a public health concern that is quickly turning into a public health crisis for both dogs and people. We cannot condone these irresponsible and dangerous practices. The current federal laws applicable to importation are archaic and easily evaded with practices calculated to circumvent them. The GRCA supports stringent vetting and quarantine procedures as well as federal legislation to protect the canine, human and wildlife populations that are placed at risk by the current importation practices.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,147 Posts
Please don't take this wrong; I'm not trying to start an argument here, but I just want to honestly ask...Do you think animal shelter staff are stupid enough to place dogs up for adoption that were at high risk of mauling a human?
100% yes. It's happened plenty of times already. They want to save every dog so badly they will hide or cover up bite history or warning signs.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,147 Posts
GRCA POSITION STATEMENT ON RESCUE IMPORTATION

The GRCA has long been an advocate of rescuing purebred Golden Retrievers. When formal breed rescues developed, the hope was always that someday rescue would no longer be necessary. Due to the promotion of responsible breeding practices and the efficiency of breed-specific rescue, the last decade has seen a steady decline in Goldens in need of rescue.

Faced with not enough dogs for available homes, Golden rescues began admitting Golden Retriever crosses and dogs from other parts of the country. As the number of Goldens requiring rescue continued to dwindle, some of the rescue groups operating under the auspices of GRCA's National Rescue Committee began actively importing dogs from countries with health standards not equivalent to our own. This is a trend among many rescue groups, not just those focused on Goldens.

Rabies, brucellosis, canine influenza, leptospirosis and other diseases have all entered the U.S. as a result of incomplete vetting, questionable documentation, lack of quarantine and acceptance of dogs with unknown histories. In addition, some dogs with poor temperaments have been imported. These practices place our resident dogs and volunteers at risk.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has released a key report finding that over a million dogs are imported into the U.S. each year. Less than one percent are subject to thorough health screenings that ensure they are healthy and free of disease before entering the U.S. This report represents a critical first step in the process to update the current statutory and regulatory framework for dog imports to ensure animal and public health is protected.

Diseased dogs post multiple threats:
to the imported dog
to the volunteers and veterinarians who come into contact with those infected dog
to the other dogs currently at the facility
to the other dogs in the community
to the public in the community
to the other animals in the ecosystem


The GRCA views this as a public health concern that is quickly turning into a public health crisis for both dogs and people. We cannot condone these irresponsible and dangerous practices. The current federal laws applicable to importation are archaic and easily evaded with practices calculated to circumvent them. The GRCA supports stringent vetting and quarantine procedures as well as federal legislation to protect the canine, human and wildlife populations that are placed at risk by the current importation practices.
Exactly. We have enough domestic disease without risking importing others.
 

· Rehoming breeder girls.
Joined
·
78 Posts
Here is another take on this subject. Hey do you want a tax free vacation to/in China? Just be a rescue and go to china as the lead person/delegation in china. Before you leave to return to the US of A, find some goldens to bring back as rescues. As a tax free rescue your trip is a tax deduction.

Am I a cynic? You got that right. What not enough Golden's to rescue here? Then stop being a rescue.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
There are several rescued Goldens from the meat market and fur market in China and Turkey that live here now, enjoying their best life. Their lives were saved and they so appreciate it. There is training that must be done as they may have absolutely no training when you adopt. But these are beautiful souls that need to be saved. The people who adopted absolutely love their rescued Golden Retrievers. And take their rescued Goldens out walking everywhere, travel with them and the rescued Goldens live in their homes as family members. These owners say it was the best decision ever to save a Golden life.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
854 Posts
Please don't take this wrong; I'm not trying to start an argument here, but I just want to honestly ask...Do you think animal shelter staff are stupid enough to place dogs up for adoption that were at high risk of mauling a human?
absolutely.. I have seen it happen first hand
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,147 Posts
There are several rescued Goldens from the meat market and fur market in China and Turkey that live here now, enjoying their best life. Their lives were saved and they so appreciate it. There is training that must be done as they may have absolutely no training when you adopt. But these are beautiful souls that need to be saved. The people who adopted absolutely love their rescued Golden Retrievers. And take their rescued Goldens out walking everywhere, travel with them and the rescued Goldens live in their homes as family members. These owners say it was the best decision ever to save a Golden life.
Yep...that's the "story"
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,791 Posts
Who are you saying is the scammer?
Americans want to “rescue” to feel good about themselves and about “saving a dog in need of a home” but want to also have a purebred dog for aesthetics and temperament and likely because domestic shelters are FULL of bully mixes that are not desirable. That’s where retail rescue fills that need.

Rescues buy purebred dogs from overseas puppy mills, advertise them as being saved from the meat trade (appeal to peoples need to save animals) and adopt them out for extremely high prices. The rescues make money, the buyers are willing to pay to “rescue” a dog but still get the breed they want. In 2019 or 2020…can’t remember exactly, the US imported something like 1 million dogs — a HIGHLY unregulated process BTW. Yet animal rights activists claim we have an overpopulation problem here.
 
61 - 80 of 94 Posts
Top