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Golden Retriever Rescues...from China?

3301 Views 93 Replies 24 Participants Last post by  Peri29
I wanted to ask for the opinions of golden retriever experts on this...One of the golden retriever rescues I network with as part of my pet sitting business has started taking in unwanted golden retrievers from China because there is a shortage of goldens in need of rescue not just in my state, but nationwide. Do you see any potential problems that could come with bringing in rescues from other countries? Rescue A Golden of Arizona - Available Dogs

Not trying to badmouth anybody; whatever choice they make is for them to decide, but I'm honestly curious about whether rescuing a golden from a place like China is a good idea or not?
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I am trying to find my screenshots of a post once where a dog that looked like a bully mix was being passed off as an Azawakh!

Edit: found them!

View attachment 899166
View attachment 899167
View attachment 899164
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View attachment 899163

For those that want to know what an Azawakh looks like:

View attachment 899168
View attachment 899169
This forum needs an eyeball roll reaction! They will literally come up with anything to not call a bully breed mix a bully breed mix!
 

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Yes I think your point here illustrates (dog classes, daycare etc) why I was so surprised people didn't vaccinate their dogs against these more deadly diseases..
Honestly, IME the people who don't vaccinate aren't usually the type that use daycare or take classes. They're usually the type who throw the dog in the yard on a rope most of the day and feed whatever is cheapest.


I'd say 90-95% in Ohio. Including the "lab mixes" that obviously have pit in them Then there's the misidentified breeds, like the rottie mix that's being called a rough collie/GSD mix. And the real kicker of the day is the doodle being passed off as a Spinone Italiano/ Irish Wolfhound mix. Although, I am impressed that they know those breeds exist!
Here too. I don't know who they think they are fooling with their "lab mix" label, but anyone with eyes can see a bully mix.
 

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I am trying to find my screenshots of a post once where a dog that looked like a bully mix was being passed off as an Azawakh!

Edit: found them!
Well....they are the same color! LOL She's cute though.

Here's the "rough collie/GSD" mix. She's a cute dog but I don't know where they came up with the breeds.
Dog Dog breed Carnivore Plant Working animal


I can't save the other dog's photo.
 

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Here are some “golden retriever” mixes from adopt a pet! There were 14 total pages of goldens. I just picked out the ones that look like bully mixes. And this is just from the first 4 pages.
Dog Dog breed Carnivore Working animal Companion dog

Dog Vertebrate Carnivore Working animal Companion dog

Dog Carnivore Dog breed Organism Fawn

Dog Dog breed Carnivore Collar Companion dog
 
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There's no way to look at Ragnor and stay sad! LOL Love that face! Obviously not goldens though!
 

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This forum needs an eyeball roll reaction! They will literally come up with anything to not call a bully breed mix a bully breed mix!
The reason why they do it is because otherwise it would be illegal to adopt these dogs in most counties in different states. BSL does not stop the flow of pit bulls into various cities and counties... it just forces rescues, etc.. to be deceptive in advertising.
 

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Hello Everyone!!!

I’ll write more in detail but I do not have the time at the moment because I have rescue dogs here in Turkey which are waiting to fly to US.Most of them will fly to Boston ( Yankee Golden Retriever Rescue). I have to feed them , wash them, groom them, kiss them , talk with them and run after them so that they do not eat, chew anything hazardous .I have to make sure that the ones in the dog hotels or fosters are safe.. My VIP clients deserve much more but this is all I can do at the moment. My life revolves around them. I love them. I have a pact with them which is that one day they will make it to US ( once CDC ban is over) and that one day they will forget what they have had to go through in their short lives. We quarrel , we laugh at eachother, we sing , cry,shout , dance and try to remind each other that " La vita e bella" . Am I complaining ? Yes, because this has been a long period due to CDC ban, I am overly stressed due to their age ( mostly seniors) and each vaccinations / preventative they receive is shortening their life span and we are stealing from their lives. I am quite frustrated and walk on egg shells. Each day they stay in Turkey, lessens the years, months or days that they will spend with their family. .I read somewhere above that people sell dogs to US. One shall be very careful before making assumptions and generalize.
In reality, I am the one who owes to these dogs. Without them , emotionally and physically , I would not be able even to get out of bed for many days. They remind me that I am still alive and have to remain a human fighting billions of stupid negativity. A free therapy. What else can I ask more???

Sure there are always some rotten eggs but it is not fair to read general remarks here that rescues & volunteers profit from these dogs and so was not fair from CDC to release a general ban on ALL American rescues . After two years , CDC finally published new rules & regulations for international rescue dogs. They should have done it much BEFORE . Guess what ?? YGRR and me personally had been already following those requirements since years. Why?? Single answer I may give here is;
SINCERE LOVE OF ANIMALS AND A SENSE OF RESPONSIBILITY TOWARDS ALL LOCAL ANIMALS & PUBLIC HEALTH
Predeparture: If you rescue a dog, you are not responsible only of their health. I also have my personal dogs . I would not endanger the health of my dogs by mingling them with rescue dogs which have not gone through multiple health checks and got fully vaccinated ( vector born diseases, brucellosis or other viral ones such as rabies, distemper, parvo, kennel cough ....)
Postarrival: YGRR already has its own quarantine area on the Hudson venue. Each dog enters its kennel for 2 weeks RETESTED and screened by certified vets .The new guidelines that CDC released were already being followed by YGRR and some other reputable American rescues since years.
@OscarsDad had 2 dogs from Turkey. Unfortunately, Sani crossed the rainbow bridge. I never met Sani personally in Turkey but once she made it to US, she went though a health checkup during quarantine period and was diagnosed with cancer ( mammary tumors), was deaf suffering from laryngeal paralysis and severe arthritis. But , she did not have any contagious disease such as Distemper, Parvo, Kennelcough, Lyme, Brucellosis including less severe ones such as Ehrlichia, Anaplasma ... They are tested multiple times before and after arriving to US..
A responsible volunteer or rescue does not only worry for his/her/its rescue dogs but also for the other animals ( local and national) not necessarily mentioning the general public health.
On the very same dog park, one day will walk & play a YGRR member's personal dog and on the very same street or area live their beloved family , friends and neighbours.
Some common sense is always useful .
For Turkey and China dogs, I have lots but lots to say & write. Quite fed up of rereading the article “ Once upon a time statue symbol Golden Retrievers of Turkey”. This is much deeper than that and it is both a social & religious issue. I only wish that you will not see what I have seen because you cannot unsee what you have seen. However, this does not mean that I disregard the lives of American dogs which is also another topic to be discussed.
To be continued....... when I have the time and when our social media content manager Maya authorizes me . Her insta page is: @mayathegoldenbee
She is a blind Ehrlichia survivor. Unfortunately, due to multiple wrong diagnosis she got blind and was also hit by a car wandering on Izmir streets. Life disappointed her in multiple ways and so we are trying our best to multiply her happiness in order to compensate the past till she will be an American girl.

Hugs & lots of barks
 

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Hello Everyone!!!

I’ll write more in detail but I do not have the time at the moment because I have rescue dogs here in Turkey which are waiting to fly to US.Most of them will fly to Boston ( Yankee Golden Retriever Rescue). I have to feed them , wash them, groom them, kiss them , talk with them and run after them so that they do not eat, chew anything hazardous .I have to make sure that the ones in the dog hotels or fosters are safe.. My VIP clients deserve much more but this is all I can do at the moment. My life revolves around them. I love them. I have a pact with them which is that one day they will make it to US ( once CDC ban is over) and that one day they will forget what they have had to go through in their short lives. We quarrel , we laugh at eachother, we sing , cry,shout , dance and try to remind each other that " La vita e bella" . Am I complaining ? Yes, because this has been a long period due to CDC ban, I am overly stressed due to their age ( mostly seniors) and each vaccinations / preventative they receive is shortening their life span and we are stealing from their lives. I am quite frustrated and walk on egg shells. Each day they stay in Turkey, lessens the years, months or days that they will spend with their family. .I read somewhere above that people sell dogs to US. One shall be very careful before making assumptions and generalize.
In reality, I am the one who owes to these dogs. Without them , emotionally and physically , I would not be able even to get out of bed for many days. They remind me that I am still alive and have to remain a human fighting billions of stupid negativity. A free therapy. What else can I ask more???

Sure there are always some rotten eggs but it is not fair to read general remarks here that rescues & volunteers profit from these dogs and so was not fair from CDC to release a general ban on ALL American rescues . After two years , CDC finally published new rules & regulations for international rescue dogs. They should have done it much BEFORE . Guess what ?? YGRR and me personally had been already following those requirements since years. Why?? Single answer I may give here is;
SINCERE LOVE OF ANIMALS AND A SENSE OF RESPONSIBILITY TOWARDS ALL LOCAL ANIMALS & PUBLIC HEALTH
Predeparture: If you rescue a dog, you are not responsible only of their health. I also have my personal dogs . I would not endanger the health of my dogs by mingling them with rescue dogs which have not gone through multiple health checks and got fully vaccinated ( vector born diseases, brucellosis or other viral ones such as rabies, distemper, parvo, kennel cough ....)
Postarrival: YGRR already has its own quarantine area on the Hudson venue. Each dog enters its kennel for 2 weeks RETESTED and screened by certified vets .The new guidelines that CDC released were already being followed by YGRR and some other reputable American rescues since years.
@OscarsDad had 2 dogs from Turkey. Unfortunately, Sani crossed the rainbow bridge. I never met Sani personally in Turkey but once she made it to US, she went though a health checkup during quarantine period and was diagnosed with cancer ( mammary tumors), was deaf suffering from laryngeal paralysis and severe arthritis. But , she did not have any contagious disease such as Distemper, Parvo, Kennelcough, Lyme, Brucellosis including less severe ones such as Ehrlichia, Anaplasma ... They are tested multiple times before and after arriving to US..
A responsible volunteer or rescue does not only worry for his/her/its rescue dogs but also for the other animals ( local and national) not necessarily mentioning the general public health.
On the very same dog park, one day will walk & play a YGRR member's personal dog and on the very same street or area live their beloved family , friends and neighbours.
Some common sense is always useful .
For Turkey and China dogs, I have lots but lots to say & write. Quite fed up of rereading the article “ Once upon a time statue symbol Golden Retrievers of Turkey”. This is much deeper than that and it is both a social & religious issue. I only wish that you will not see what I have seen because you cannot unsee what you have seen. However, this does not mean that I disregard the lives of American dogs which is also another topic to be discussed.
To be continued....... when I have the time and when our social media content manager Maya authorizes me . Her insta page is: @mayathegoldenbee
She is a blind Ehrlichia survivor. Unfortunately, due to multiple wrong diagnosis she got blind and was also hit by a car wandering on Izmir streets. Life disappointed her in multiple ways and so we are trying our best to multiply her happiness in order to compensate the past till she will be an American girl.

Hugs & lots of barks
I really appreciate your insight on this topic, as Turkey is one of those that I’ve always questioned and only had whatever vague descriptions reporters and such gave us. I’ve seen the hostels and street dogs and consecrated efforts for veterinarians to go to Turkey and do spay/neuter.
 

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Hello Everyone!!!

I’ll write more in detail but I do not have the time at the moment because I have rescue dogs here in Turkey which are waiting to fly to US.Most of them will fly to Boston ( Yankee Golden Retriever Rescue). I have to feed them , wash them, groom them, kiss them , talk with them and run after them so that they do not eat, chew anything hazardous .I have to make sure that the ones in the dog hotels or fosters are safe.. My VIP clients deserve much more but this is all I can do at the moment. My life revolves around them. I love them. I have a pact with them which is that one day they will make it to US ( once CDC ban is over) and that one day they will forget what they have had to go through in their short lives. We quarrel , we laugh at eachother, we sing , cry,shout , dance and try to remind each other that " La vita e bella" . Am I complaining ? Yes, because this has been a long period due to CDC ban, I am overly stressed due to their age ( mostly seniors) and each vaccinations / preventative they receive is shortening their life span and we are stealing from their lives. I am quite frustrated and walk on egg shells. Each day they stay in Turkey, lessens the years, months or days that they will spend with their family. .I read somewhere above that people sell dogs to US. One shall be very careful before making assumptions and generalize.
In reality, I am the one who owes to these dogs. Without them , emotionally and physically , I would not be able even to get out of bed for many days. They remind me that I am still alive and have to remain a human fighting billions of stupid negativity. A free therapy. What else can I ask more???

Sure there are always some rotten eggs but it is not fair to read general remarks here that rescues & volunteers profit from these dogs and so was not fair from CDC to release a general ban on ALL American rescues . After two years , CDC finally published new rules & regulations for international rescue dogs. They should have done it much BEFORE . Guess what ?? YGRR and me personally had been already following those requirements since years. Why?? Single answer I may give here is;
SINCERE LOVE OF ANIMALS AND A SENSE OF RESPONSIBILITY TOWARDS ALL LOCAL ANIMALS & PUBLIC HEALTH
Predeparture: If you rescue a dog, you are not responsible only of their health. I also have my personal dogs . I would not endanger the health of my dogs by mingling them with rescue dogs which have not gone through multiple health checks and got fully vaccinated ( vector born diseases, brucellosis or other viral ones such as rabies, distemper, parvo, kennel cough ....)
Postarrival: YGRR already has its own quarantine area on the Hudson venue. Each dog enters its kennel for 2 weeks RETESTED and screened by certified vets .The new guidelines that CDC released were already being followed by YGRR and some other reputable American rescues since years.
@OscarsDad had 2 dogs from Turkey. Unfortunately, Sani crossed the rainbow bridge. I never met Sani personally in Turkey but once she made it to US, she went though a health checkup during quarantine period and was diagnosed with cancer ( mammary tumors), was deaf suffering from laryngeal paralysis and severe arthritis. But , she did not have any contagious disease such as Distemper, Parvo, Kennelcough, Lyme, Brucellosis including less severe ones such as Ehrlichia, Anaplasma ... They are tested multiple times before and after arriving to US..
A responsible volunteer or rescue does not only worry for his/her/its rescue dogs but also for the other animals ( local and national) not necessarily mentioning the general public health.
On the very same dog park, one day will walk & play a YGRR member's personal dog and on the very same street or area live their beloved family , friends and neighbours.
Some common sense is always useful .
For Turkey and China dogs, I have lots but lots to say & write. Quite fed up of rereading the article “ Once upon a time statue symbol Golden Retrievers of Turkey”. This is much deeper than that and it is both a social & religious issue. I only wish that you will not see what I have seen because you cannot unsee what you have seen. However, this does not mean that I disregard the lives of American dogs which is also another topic to be discussed.
To be continued....... when I have the time and when our social media content manager Maya authorizes me . Her insta page is: @mayathegoldenbee
She is a blind Ehrlichia survivor. Unfortunately, due to multiple wrong diagnosis she got blind and was also hit by a car wandering on Izmir streets. Life disappointed her in multiple ways and so we are trying our best to multiply her happiness in order to compensate the past till she will be an American girl.

Hugs & lots of barks
Regardless, though I feel bad for any dog, anywhere that isn't in a loving home, the US doesn't need to import a single dog from anywhere. We are loaded with our own homeless dogs and cats that need sorted without adding to it.
 

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Regardless, though I feel bad for any dog, anywhere that isn't in a loving home, the US doesn't need to import a single dog from anywhere. We are loaded with our own homeless dogs and cats that need sorted without adding to it.
Am I wrong, then, for wanting to rescue a golden retriever, specifically - if the domestic supply doesn't meet the demand?

I'm not hoping for there to be more homeless or abused goldens, but it seems every time a golden appears at a shelter, it's snatched up before I can even blink. Good for the dog, too bad for me.

It's sad that GRs are being imported from abroad to meet the demand. I've adopted three rescue GRs before, and that's what I want to do next time.

I feel like the doors are closing on me. Finding an ethical GR breeder is a challenge, if I wanted to go that way; the ethics of Turkey or China rescue are held to challenge too; and domestic GR rescue is a don't-blink situation.
 

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Regardless, though I feel bad for any dog, anywhere that isn't in a loving home, the US doesn't need to import a single dog from anywhere. We are loaded with our own homeless dogs and cats that need sorted without adding to it.
I frankly understand you and will touch on this subject separately. Please do not think that we are not concerned for American Dogs. The well being & life of American Dogs are important for me as much as Turkish, European or Chinese Dogs. This is again a very fragile subject . I rather give my opinion in a more appropriate way since this subject deserves again a sociopolitical attention . At this very moment, a gypsy is singing to go out to potty and shall temporarilyp leave the topic. ( an English Setter who will join ABESR ;another very professional rescue that I trust in US .They are very careful when it comes to the health of rescue dogs both from Europe and Turkey. Both national and international rescue dogs from abroad directly enter veterinary clinic for quarantine where they once more receive health checkups before being placed in foster cares. They also rescue local English Setters ( in US) .
 

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I really appreciate your insight on this topic, as Turkey is one of those that I’ve always questioned and only had whatever vague descriptions reporters and such gave us. I’ve seen the hostels and street dogs and consecrated efforts for veterinarians to go to Turkey and do spay/neuter.
I will be writing on this subject ( China & Turkey)in a way that it deserves. We have already discussed the topic on the forum on various threads but we shall maybe pin it somewhere with a new post I will make. Turkish volunteers are not fighting against ignorant pet owners but also municipal shelters whose main job shall be neutering / spaying. Instad they.......
 

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We are loaded with our own homeless dogs and cats that need sorted without adding to it.
While I understand this is the case in many areas of the country, there are others (like New England) where spay/neuter is common and most of our shelters and rescue groups (even those based in large urban areas) are largely empty except for dogs brought up from southern rescues. And most of the dogs coming up from the south are either pit mixes or hounds - not particularly popular breeds here and not a good substitute for someone who might have their heart set on, say, a Golden Retriever, or a retriever mix, or a small dog (especially a small dog that isn't a chihuahua, which seems to be all that's available from the rescues that specialize in the smaller dogs). Because most of the dogs are coming up from the South, many rescues expect you to commit to a dog without even having met it! Here in the northeast, dogs that aren't pit mixes (and who don't have the "no other pets, no kids, has separation anxiety" type issues) fly out of our shelters and rescues before most people even know they are there.

When I lost my last golden to cancer I did some soul searching about whether I was ready to do another Golden and spent 6 months monitoring local shelters and rescue groups for a dog that might be what I wanted and needed (youngish, good with my other dogs and my cats, some potential to do a dog sport - and I wanted to be able to meet the dog before making a commitment!). In that time, I only found 3 dogs that might fit the bill: two already had a multi-person waitlist by the time I applied, and the one that we were first on the list for ended up not being a good fit.

Years ago, I was an active member of YGRR and did a lot of home visits for them. Every home I checked was awesome, BUT YGRR had so few dogs that the wait (especially for young family dogs without significant health or behavioral issues) could be years, even for a great potential home. In the last few years Yankee started accepting Golden mixes and bringing dogs in from places like Turkey because the demand was so high and the supply was so low. I know this isn't the case everywhere, but I'm in full sympathy with rescues like YGRR bringing in dogs from overseas, especially if they are working with groups that can be fairly confidently confirmed to be actually rescuing and not breeding for the lack of Goldens in the US.
 

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While I understand this is the case in many areas of the country, there are others (like New England) where spay/neuter is common and most of our shelters and rescue groups (even those based in large urban areas) are largely empty except for dogs brought up from southern rescues. And most of the dogs coming up from the south are either pit mixes or hounds - not particularly popular breeds here and not a good substitute for someone who might have their heart set on, say, a Golden Retriever, or a retriever mix, or a small dog (especially a small dog that isn't a chihuahua, which seems to be all that's available from the rescues that specialize in the smaller dogs). Because most of the dogs are coming up from the South, many rescues expect you to commit to a dog without even having met it! Here in the northeast, dogs that aren't pit mixes (and who don't have the "no other pets, no kids, has separation anxiety" type issues) fly out of our shelters and rescues before most people even know they are there.

When I lost my last golden to cancer I did some soul searching about whether I was ready to do another Golden and spent 6 months monitoring local shelters and rescue groups for a dog that might be what I wanted and needed (youngish, good with my other dogs and my cats, some potential to do a dog sport - and I wanted to be able to meet the dog before making a commitment!). In that time, I only found 3 dogs that might fit the bill: two already had a multi-person waitlist by the time I applied, and the one that we were first on the list for ended up not being a good fit.

Years ago, I was an active member of YGRR and did a lot of home visits for them. Every home I checked was awesome, BUT YGRR had so few dogs that the wait (especially for young family dogs without significant health or behavioral issues) could be years, even for a great potential home. In the last few years Yankee started accepting Golden mixes and bringing dogs in from places like Turkey because the demand was so high and the supply was so low. I know this isn't the case everywhere, but I'm in full sympathy with rescues like YGRR bringing in dogs from overseas, especially if they are working with groups that can be fairly confidently confirmed to be actually rescuing and not breeding for the lack of Goldens in the US.
Well written
 

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While I understand this is the case in many areas of the country, there are others (like New England) where spay/neuter is common and most of our shelters and rescue groups (even those based in large urban areas) are largely empty except for dogs brought up from southern rescues. And most of the dogs coming up from the south are either pit mixes or hounds - not particularly popular breeds here and not a good substitute for someone who might have their heart set on, say, a Golden Retriever, or a retriever mix, or a small dog (especially a small dog that isn't a chihuahua, which seems to be all that's available from the rescues that specialize in the smaller dogs). Because most of the dogs are coming up from the South, many rescues expect you to commit to a dog without even having met it! Here in the northeast, dogs that aren't pit mixes (and who don't have the "no other pets, no kids, has separation anxiety" type issues) fly out of our shelters and rescues before most people even know they are there.

When I lost my last golden to cancer I did some soul searching about whether I was ready to do another Golden and spent 6 months monitoring local shelters and rescue groups for a dog that might be what I wanted and needed (youngish, good with my other dogs and my cats, some potential to do a dog sport - and I wanted to be able to meet the dog before making a commitment!). In that time, I only found 3 dogs that might fit the bill: two already had a multi-person waitlist by the time I applied, and the one that we were first on the list for ended up not being a good fit.

Years ago, I was an active member of YGRR and did a lot of home visits for them. Every home I checked was awesome, BUT YGRR had so few dogs that the wait (especially for young family dogs without significant health or behavioral issues) could be years, even for a great potential home. In the last few years Yankee started accepting Golden mixes and bringing dogs in from places like Turkey because the demand was so high and the supply was so low. I know this isn't the case everywhere, but I'm in full sympathy with rescues like YGRR bringing in dogs from overseas, especially if they are working with groups that can be fairly confidently confirmed to be actually rescuing and not breeding for the lack of Goldens in the US.
While I understand what you're saying, and I am fully aware that the south supplies a lot of rescue dogs (of generally less desirable breed combos) there is still, in my opinion, no circumstance currently under which we should be importing dogs to "rescue." If a person very much wants to rescue, then they should work with what is available here in the US. If they want a specific breed and can't find one to rescue, then they should do what is probably the best thing anyway, which is get on a list with a reputable breeder and purchase a quality, well bred dog of the breed they desire. Again, I feel very much for dogs in other countries that need help too, but we need to mop up our own mess before we get involved in anyone else's. That means we need to do the hard things, like euthanizing dogs that are not likely to find homes for whatever reason (instead of trying to ship them north where they aren't terribly wanted either), and instead of putting money into importing foreign strays, we put the money into even more low cost or free spay/neuter clinics (especially in the south), and put money towards round up programs to capture and either alter or euthanize feral or stray/roaming populations to stop the constant flow of puppies (and kittens) into shelters or on the streets. We can also use the money to improve the situation in shelters here, maybe pay the staff a living wage, and fund better care for the US dogs waiting for homes.
 

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While I understand what you're saying, and I am fully aware that the south supplies a lot of rescue dogs (of generally less desirable breed combos) there is still, in my opinion, no circumstance currently under which we should be importing dogs to "rescue." If a person very much wants to rescue, then they should work with what is available here in the US. If they want a specific breed and can't find one to rescue, then they should do what is probably the best thing anyway, which is get on a list with a reputable breeder and purchase a quality, well bred dog of the breed they desire. Again, I feel very much for dogs in other countries that need help too, but we need to mop up our own mess before we get involved in anyone else's. That means we need to do the hard things, like euthanizing dogs that are not likely to find homes for whatever reason (instead of trying to ship them north where they aren't terribly wanted either), and instead of putting money into importing foreign strays, we put the money into even more low cost or free spay/neuter clinics (especially in the south), and put money towards round up programs to capture and either alter or euthanize feral or stray/roaming populations to stop the constant flow of puppies (and kittens) into shelters or on the streets. We can also use the money to improve the situation in shelters here, maybe pay the staff a living wage, and fund better care for the US dogs waiting for homes.
Some of this is already done, we have a million low cost or free spay neuter clinics in the south. Literally TONS. And we also do a lot of euthanasias for dogs that don’t get adopted. When I lived in central Florida, I lived right next to a high volume discount spay neuter clinic that happened to be right next to animal control. The local SPCA pulled dogs from AC and whatever didn’t get pulled was euthanized.

But I do think that most people that the ever increasing price tag of well-bred Goldens is a huge deterrent. So that leaves people with rescue or to support less than reputable breeders. It’s like the lesser of two evils.
I have no qualms with rescue and as long as it’s all done legally and with the proper channels, it’s only a win win situation. People get a dog they want and a dog gets a home. I don’t agree with supporting foreign breeders under the guise of saving dogs from the meat trade, but I do believe their is a place for rescue and families that want to rescue for whatever their reasons may be.
 

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Some of this is already done, we have a million low cost or free spay neuter clinics in the south.
Yes, there are lots but given the situation we either need more or we need more funds to make them free instead of low cost.

But I do think that most people that the ever increasing price tag of well-bred Goldens is a huge deterrent. So that leaves people with rescue or to support less than reputable breeders.
No argument from me that the price tag on Goldens is a potential problem, and bybs are a huge issue as well. But none of that changes the fact that I believe we need to fix our own issues before we import someone else's.

I'm not trying to change anyone's mind, I'm just sharing my opinion.
 

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Yes, there are lots but given the situation we either need more or we need more funds to make them free instead of low cost.


No argument from me that the price tag on Goldens is a potential problem, and bybs are a huge issue as well. But none of that changes the fact that I believe we need to fix our own issues before we import someone else's.

I'm not trying to change anyone's mind, I'm just sharing my opinion.
It’s fair, it just that we have the resources down here for spay neuter, just not the will. A lot of people don’t want to neuter their bully mixes. Free roaming is just a part of nature and tons of people have whatever mix puppies that go onto friends. One of my friends found out her dog was pregnant without realizing she was in heat but didn’t care to spay her. 12 bully puppies born outside, all found homes and she kept two boys. Both still intact. She has the funds, as a nurse, to fix them, just never grew up with fixed animals.

I think it’ll be changing a culture if we want to see real changes. The north has the opposite problem as us lol
 
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