Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Golden or Lab...

What’s your favorite and why (I know that’s kind of an odd question on a Golden forum)? Similarities and differences? I know that this varies a lot and also that field bred versus show bred in both breeds are drastically different and even two field bred dogs from both breeds have differences but just curious. From what I have read Goldens appear to be slightly softer and more sensitive, less hardheaded, and don’t seem to deal with loud and/or chaotic environments as well? Do you find that true? Would love pictures and/or stories from both breeds. I love both breeds, we’ve always had Labs or Lab crosses but every Golden I’ve met has been incredibly sweet and I have loved them as well. I love all dogs but seem to have a special fondness for the hunting breeds like retrievers and spaniels. They’re just such great dogs. Although my list of potential breeds is very long and includes dogs from every group lol Anyway, would love to talk about these two breeds (or other retrievers/sporting breeds) as well as get some opinions/input. I can’t get another dog for a while but right now the major contenders are these two breeds (Goldens and Labs) as well as Aussies and Poodles. Looking for a smart, loyal, fairly easily trainable, active dog that I can take places with me and hike and bike and possibly skijor with as well as train in agility, nosework, and/or obedience and teach tricks. Love training so I’d want to train a lot but not necessarily be crazy needing to do something every second. Preferably loving/wanting to be with me as well and good off leash so a lot of breeds fit that bill which makes it hard to narrow down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
763 Posts
So full disclosure I love Golden's. I also happen to be the co-owner of my sons Yellow Lab. He lived with us for the first 2 years of his life and then my son took him to his new house when he moved out. He now lives 1 mile down the road. All of our dogs are field bred and trained. They all hunt, well except the baby, but he's learning. I can say I always assumed a lab would shed less... WRONG!! I find they are both equally trainable and good with kids. I feel like they both live to please their owners. I would say going through the puppy stages was mostly the same with the lab, Whiskey, and my puppy Moe. That being said Duke, my older Golden, was a dream compared to the other two. They are great dogs but both Whiskey (lab) and Moe (golden) require more exercise. A tired dog is a good dog! In my opinion as Golden's mature they have a better off switch. I also can't resist when they look at you like they see your soul. I find that Whiskey (lab) looks at me more as if to say "what are we going to do next?"

I can tell you my son grew up with Golden's. He's never lived a day without one in the house. He loves hunting both, but on a tough day on the open water he will choose his lab. It's not that the Golden can't keep up, trust me they can. He says that Duke, our 8 year old Golden, will look at him after he's had enough retrieves like "go get it yourself if you want to be pushy". lol He does say that Duke never refuses a send, but Whiskey never wants to stop. Now I am interested to see if our Golden puppy, Moe, is more like Duke or Whiskey. I can say that his personality is more non stop. Duke was bred from both conformation (mother) and field lines (father). Moe's breeding is more performance on both sides.

My son is very interested in Moe. I think he's a Golden lover at heart. He's a hard core hunting guide though and has total respect and admiration for what Whiskey does. I have been told that Whiskey is a very high strung, pushy lab. I'm not sure if our assessment of him would apply to all labs. Our son also has people that hunt with him request our Golden. It's always interesting to me. I have to say I love them both, but I'm a Golden girl at heart. The training of Moe has brought my husband back around to hunting. He's always trained and worked the dogs, but quit hunting a few years ago. I think we all have that one dog, no matter what breed, that we fall in love with.
 

Attachments

·
Kristy
Joined
·
9,302 Posts
My short very nontechnical answer is Have you felt Golden Retriever hair? I can't live happily without having that to stroke.
Oh my gosh, my heart.... THIS!!!

I'm also a sporting dog person, even though I love dogs in general. I've known brilliant Labs and brilliant Goldens, food motivated and people-pleasing dogs of both breeds. But nothing is like burying your fingers and your face into to the ruff of a Golden when you need comfort or just a snuggle. Plus, there is just something so wonderfully gorgeous and regal about a well bred Golden (and I don't mean just a fluffy conformation bred dog - FYI: This girl with Santa is perfectly gorgeous :) https://www.goldenretrieverforum.com/golden-retrievers-main-discussion/504548-shala-santa.html

I've known several wonderful labs, my parents' heart dog was a lab who I adored and a dear friend of mine has competitive performance labs who are wonderful. I just find that the most loving personalities seem to consistently be Goldens.

As mentioned above, Labrador hair is a nightmare, it is spiky and will stick into upholstery. Golden fluff is much easier to clean up. I'll never be without Goldens in my life.

ETA: I see you've mentioned Aussies and Poodles - be sure you've spent a LOT of time with those breeds to know what you're getting into if you haven't done so. Standard poodles are very bright, but not many are bred to retrieve anymore, you'd want to be sure you find a breeder who is striving for those characteristics. And Aussies are a herding breed, I adore my rough collie, but he is a completely different personality than a retriever. Not.... the ..... same.... AT ALL.
 

·
Kate
Joined
·
21,060 Posts
Well, since you are looking at a wide variety of breeds... the important first step is understanding the difference between groups.

"Naturally active and alert, Sporting dogs make likeable, well-rounded companions. First developed to work closely with hunters to locate and/or retrieve quarry. There are four basic types of Sporting dogs; spaniels, pointers, retrievers and setters. Known for their superior instincts in water and woods, many of these breeds enjoy hunting and other field activities. Many of them, especially the water-retrieving breeds, have well –insulated water repellant coats, which are quite resilient to the elements."

And...

"Up until 1983, the breeds in the Herding Group were part of the Working Group. All Herding breeds share an instinctual ability to control the movement of other animals. These breeds were developed to gather, herd and protect livestock. Today, some like the Belgian Malinois and the German Shepherd Dog are commonly used for police and protection work. The herding instinct in these breeds is so strong that Herding breeds have been known to gently herd their owners, especially the children of the family. In general, these intelligent dogs make excellent companions and respond beautifully to training exercises."

And -

"Quick to learn, dogs of the Working Group are intelligent, strong, watchful, and alert. Bred to assist man, they excel at jobs such as guarding property, pulling sleds and performing water rescues. Doberman Pinschers, Siberian Huskies and Great Danes are part of this Group, to name just a few. They make wonderful companions but because they are large, and naturally protective, prospective owners need to know how to properly train and socialize a dog. Some breeds in the Working Group may not be for the first-time dog owner."

And....

"Feisty and energetic are two of the primary traits that come to mind for those who have experience with Terriers. In fact, many describe their distinct personalities as “eager for a spirited argument.” Bred to hunt, kill vermin and to guard their families home or barn; sizes range from fairly small, as in the Norfolk, Cairn or West Highland White Terrier, to the larger and grand Airedale Terrier. Prospective owners should know that terriers make great pets, but they do require determination on the part of the owner because they can be stubborn; have high energy levels, and require special grooming (known as “stripping”) to maintain a characteristic appearance"


^^^^ What all that means is that if you want an attentive, highly trainable, eager to please, wants to be with his owners all the time... look to the sporting group and herding group. Those are going to have the trainability and desire to please or work. You have highly social breeds who rely on being with their "pack". And they enjoy having jobs to do.

I've excluded both the nonsporting and toy groups because the breeds in those groups are so varied. For the above groups though, you have very typical traits that you might expect for individual breeds within a group. It what they have in common.

Goldens and labs are separate breeds in the sporting group - they are both retriever breeds and typically in style and type are very similar.

Labs were generally a more all around rugged dog. They descended from a fisherman's breed (St. John's Newfoundland) whose purpose it was to go out and drag boats in, retrieve ropes and other things, and even jump in and retrieve fish. It was rich guys in the UK who took that rugged mixed type breed and used it to create a hunting breed (or shooting breed) that was more readily recognizable by appearance. Mainly it was rich people back then who had the luxury of going the extra mile to not just breed for an excellent working dog, but they also wanted a certain look to the dogs.

A lot of people assume they are related to goldens and goldens are just a long haired variety of retriever. But technically speaking, goldens were never interbred with labs. They are closer related to flat coated retrievers and probably more distantly curly coated retrievers. As well as Irish Water Spaniels and even setters. Goldens "may" have some distant relation to St. John's Newfoundland, but based on the written history and clear breeding evidence they aren't closely related to today's labs at all.

Anyway - comparing the two breeds is about the same as comparing golden retrievers to english setters. Because they are in the same group, you will find similarities between the breeds.

Me personally - labs are more "doggy" than golden retrievers and I mean that in many ways.

Goldens are more focused on their owners and strongly desire to please and interact with their people. They typically are softer and easier to train with minimal corrections. They can take corrections and are not supposed to be fearful or anxious. They should be confident and boisterous dogs.

Both breeds should have a love of water and swimming.

And both breeds should have a love and need for running.

Both breeds are very social and outgoing - which means you as the owner need to work on building a connection with your dog to get them to focus on you. Easier to do with goldens...

Both breeds should want to have things in their mouths. And they should not clamp down to such an extent that they damage what have in their mouths. And they should be willing to open their mouths and surrender what they have to their owners.

There's a bit in a book I read (White Fang I think) about pit bulls and how one used to fight White Fang and clamped down on his neck and locked his jaw. Even the owner of the pit bull could not get the dog to release and they were ready to shoot the dog to get him to open his jaws. <= That type of thing should not be what you experience with a retriever breed. Not fighting of course, but also not the clamping down behaviors.

Labs, that I've seen in training tend to be not as sharp and pliant as golden retrievers. As long as an owner is clear, the golden retriever should learn something new within a single training session. With labs, you get more of a steam off the dog's head because he's just not as sharp. That doesn't meant they are stupid. It's just you don't have them thinking overtime about what their owner wants and trying to be "right".

Labs excel in "big work" that's more reliant on their instincts. A friend's lab is a cadaver dog. And he's an OTCH dog in the works. I believe he's related to one of top labs in obedience. But he's like a bull in a china shop to see him working in obedience. And he's about 2-3 years old now and still hasn't figured out how to contain himself. This is a dog that still takes down ring gaiting while nailing go-outs. But he's a very good working dog in his real job as a cadaver dog. He goes the extra mile while working his butt off.

Goldens excel in all the same fields, but for obedience a golden is just a lot of fun to work with. You are talking about a breed that typical knows where all his feet are, who knows he has a rear end, doesn't need to be handled roughly at all ever, who shines every time he works no matter how small the ring. No matter how green he is.

With goldens you get dogs like mine who will work just to get attention. I have my guys milling around the room in front of me, frequently making eye contact and are ever ready to DO SOMETHING if I say the word or give them a hand signal. I had a dog who HATED sits and down stays, except at home when he was working for attention. And he would get super amped up and HAPPY just from getting to do stays with my other boy. <= That's a golden retriever.

Other huge difference between the breeds which is more the typical difference that most people already notice and recognize.

I know people who only brush their labs in spring. They never brush the dogs the rest of the year. :surprise: When they brush the dogs you get MOUNDS AND MOUNDS of dead fur coming out of that coat.

With goldens you could not get away with that. Not unless they want to sit down with a dematting blade and work out all the mats that will be behind the ears, on the chest, and in the trousers. That's field and show bred goldens alike.

Likewise, goldens seem to be more prone to skin problems. It's probably thickness and length of coat + poor care, but they are more prone to hot spots or other skin ailments. All which could be avoided with proper diets + proper grooming on a routine basis.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Yes Hair...the feel of goldens. I have lived a year without it.
The hair of labs is impossible to get off a tile floor. It is like magnet glued to floor. I have cared for labs for long periods of time and the hair remains long,long after their departure. Golden's fluff clumps and goes into a vacuum.
Soulful gazing together at the moon and stars, that's my goldens
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thank you all so much for all the replies and detailed descriptions of the differences and everything. It was very, very helpful. I found Megora's description of the differences in their work and everything very interesting and from that it sounds like a Golden is the type of dog I want, very focused and in tune to me, but the health issues in the breed are definitely a concern and I do also wonder how much of it depends on finding the right breeder in either breed as well as training? Although that said, it does seem like Goldens have a more natural focus and desire to please and work rather than having to be taught focus or eye contact. Which is nice. I also note you mention that Labs are better at real work which seems in line with what I have read which seems to suggest that Labs take their work more seriously than Goldens do? And it was saying that's why they're usually seen so often in serious work like SAR and guide dogs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,222 Posts
Hi...I have both a golden retriever (2 1/2) and a labrador retriever (10 months)...they are both playful, loveable and loads of fun. They both shed, have unique, fantastic personalities and I love them like crazy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Hi...I have both a golden retriever (2 1/2) and a labrador retriever (10 months)...they are both playful, loveable and loads of fun. They both shed, have unique, fantastic personalities and I love them like crazy.
They both sound amazing! Do you find their trainability similar? I assume that is them in your avatar. Beautiful dogs.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,223 Posts
I own a Lab, several Goldens, and a Clumber. The Clumber is the most recent addition and I now just laugh when people talk about Labs and Goldens shedding because neither breed has anything on a Clumber. Clumbers shed every moment of the day - literally every second.

Comparing my Goldens and Lab - I like the golden coat way better but I appreciate how driven and focused my lab is. (My lab also makes beautiful, sweet puppies.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I own a Lab, several Goldens, and a Clumber. The Clumber is the most recent addition and I now just laugh when people talk about Labs and Goldens shedding because neither breed has anything on a Clumber. Clumbers shed every moment of the day - literally every second.

Comparing my Goldens and Lab - I like the golden coat way better but I appreciate how driven and focused my lab is. (My lab also makes beautiful, sweet puppies.)
So you do think labs are focused and able to learn well and listen/obey?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,382 Posts
Regarding focus, I think it totally depends on the dogs personality and breeding. In my experience, Goldens are very focused and intelligent. They excell at Obedience, seemingly over Labradors and plenty succeed at service dog work.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,223 Posts
Regarding focus, I think it totally depends on the dogs personality and breeding.
OP, I agree with that statement. My Lab is a breeder for a service dog organization. (This means she's part of their breeding colony and her puppies are sent out to volunteer puppy raisers with the hope they'll become service dogs when they reach age 2.) They're breeding for personality and focus. So, my Lab has a terrific personality and is very task focused. My Goldens from good breeders are also focused and were easy to train. My golden that was rescued from a backyard breeder who was also a meth-head is not focused and took an unbelievable level of patience and time to train.

If it were me, I'd pick the breed you like better and look for a high quality breeder. You really can't go wrong with a well bred Lab or Golden. (I absolutely recommend Clumbers, too. They're terrific dogs. But you have to love snoring, shedding, and slobber.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,660 Posts
Regarding focus, I think it totally depends on the dogs personality and breeding.
I also agree very much with this. I have seen both Goldens and Labs who are very focused and hard working and trainable. Some of the field-bred Labs are way to the extreme in terms of drive and desire to work and resilience - which is GREAT if you want a serious field competitor. If you want a hunting companion and pet, you can get that in either a Golden or a Lab.

For me, I love Goldens, have only ever had Goldens, and will always have Goldens. I love their softness (fur and heart) and their energy and their trainability. I like a dog who I can do lots of different dog sports with, but who will be happy to curl up on the couch when we're done.

Oh my gosh, my heart.... THIS!!!

I'm also a sporting dog person, even though I love dogs in general. I've known brilliant Labs and brilliant Goldens, food motivated and people-pleasing dogs of both breeds. But nothing is like burying your fingers and your face into to the ruff of a Golden when you need comfort or just a snuggle. Plus, there is just something so wonderfully gorgeous and regal about a well bred Golden (and I don't mean just a fluffy conformation bred dog - FYI: This girl with Santa is perfectly gorgeous :) https://www.goldenretrieverforum.com/golden-retrievers-main-discussion/504548-shala-santa.html
:eek::eek: Aw, thanks. She is also just a wonderful dog to live with. And the OP, she is exactly what I wanted in a dog. If you find a good breeder, you can basically tell them what you are hoping for in your dog, and they will try to make the best match possible. I wanted high energy, highly trainable, one that would go go go, have a good rest, then be ready to go again. And that's what I got - and more. So finding a good breeder, of whatever breed you decide to go with, is key.

I also have to say, there are a number of Brittany spaniels in my neighbourhood. If you are able to give them the kind of exercise they need (ie. tons - and tons of space to run), they are also really great dogs. I love watching them run and run and run in the parks.
 

·
Gabby
Joined
·
123 Posts
I also agree very much with this. I have seen both Goldens and Labs who are very focused and hard working and trainable. Some of the field-bred Labs are way to the extreme in terms of drive and desire to work and resilience - which is GREAT if you want a serious field competitor. If you want a hunting companion and pet, you can get that in either a Golden or a Lab.

For me, I love Goldens, have only ever had Goldens, and will always have Goldens. I love their softness (fur and heart) and their energy and their trainability. I like a dog who I can do lots of different dog sports with, but who will be happy to curl up on the couch when we're done.



:eek::eek: Aw, thanks. She is also just a wonderful dog to live with. And the OP, she is exactly what I wanted in a dog. If you find a good breeder, you can basically tell them what you are hoping for in your dog, and they will try to make the best match possible. I wanted high energy, highly trainable, one that would go go go, have a good rest, then be ready to go again. And that's what I got - and more. So finding a good breeder, of whatever breed you decide to go with, is key.

I also have to say, there are a number of Brittany spaniels in my neighbourhood. If you are able to give them the kind of exercise they need (ie. tons - and tons of space to run), they are also really great dogs. I love watching them run and run and run in the parks.
Okay I realize this is totally off-topic but speaking of Brittanys I have a hilarious video of a Brittany Spaniel who is owned by one of the employees at our private dog park. She gets the run of the grounds when she's working (beautiful forested areas) and once she sees a bird or a squirrel, she sits down and has LASER FOCUS. Scully will walk up to her and sit next to her and kiss her face and she just keeps staring. It's hilarious and so so cute. Video below.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Regarding focus, I think it totally depends on the dogs personality and breeding. In my experience, Goldens are very focused and intelligent. They excell at Obedience, seemingly over Labradors and plenty succeed at service dog work.
Regarding focus, I think it totally depends on the dogs personality and breeding.
OP, I agree with that statement. My Lab is a breeder for a service dog organization. (This means she's part of their breeding colony and her puppies are sent out to volunteer puppy raisers with the hope they'll become service dogs when they reach age 2.) They're breeding for personality and focus. So, my Lab has a terrific personality and is very task focused. My Goldens from good breeders are also focused and were easy to train. My golden that was rescued from a backyard breeder who was also a meth-head is not focused and took an unbelievable level of patience and time to train.

If it were me, I'd pick the breed you like better and look for a high quality breeder. You really can't go wrong with a well bred Lab or Golden. (I absolutely recommend Clumbers, too. They're terrific dogs. But you have to love snoring, shedding, and slobber.)
Regarding focus, I think it totally depends on the dogs personality and breeding.
I also agree very much with this. I have seen both Goldens and Labs who are very focused and hard working and trainable. Some of the field-bred Labs are way to the extreme in terms of drive and desire to work and resilience - which is GREAT if you want a serious field competitor. If you want a hunting companion and pet, you can get that in either a Golden or a Lab.

For me, I love Goldens, have only ever had Goldens, and will always have Goldens. I love their softness (fur and heart) and their energy and their trainability. I like a dog who I can do lots of different dog sports with, but who will be happy to curl up on the couch when we're done.

Oh my gosh, my heart.... THIS!!!

I'm also a sporting dog person, even though I love dogs in general. I've known brilliant Labs and brilliant Goldens, food motivated and people-pleasing dogs of both breeds. But nothing is like burying your fingers and your face into to the ruff of a Golden when you need comfort or just a snuggle. Plus, there is just something so wonderfully gorgeous and regal about a well bred Golden (and I don't mean just a fluffy conformation bred dog - FYI: This girl with Santa is perfectly gorgeous <img src="http://www.goldenretrieverforum.com/images/smilies/smile.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Smile" class="inlineimg" /> https://www.goldenretrieverforum.com/golden-retrievers-main-discussion/504548-shala-santa.html
<img src="http://www.goldenretrieverforum.com/images/smilies/redface.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Embarrassment" class="inlineimg" /><img src="http://www.goldenretrieverforum.com/images/smilies/redface.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Embarrassment" class="inlineimg" /> Aw, thanks. She is also just a wonderful dog to live with. And the OP, she is exactly what I wanted in a dog. If you find a good breeder, you can basically tell them what you are hoping for in your dog, and they will try to make the best match possible. I wanted high energy, highly trainable, one that would go go go, have a good rest, then be ready to go again. And that's what I got - and more. So finding a good breeder, of whatever breed you decide to go with, is key.

I also have to say, there are a number of Brittany spaniels in my neighbourhood. If you are able to give them the kind of exercise they need (ie. tons - and tons of space to run), they are also really great dogs. I love watching them run and run and run in the parks.
I also agree very much with this. I have seen both Goldens and Labs who are very focused and hard working and trainable. Some of the field-bred Labs are way to the extreme in terms of drive and desire to work and resilience - which is GREAT if you want a serious field competitor. If you want a hunting companion and pet, you can get that in either a Golden or a Lab.

For me, I love Goldens, have only ever had Goldens, and will always have Goldens. I love their softness (fur and heart) and their energy and their trainability. I like a dog who I can do lots of different dog sports with, but who will be happy to curl up on the couch when we're done.



<img src="http://www.goldenretrieverforum.com/images/smilies/redface.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Embarrassment" class="inlineimg" /><img src="http://www.goldenretrieverforum.com/images/smilies/redface.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Embarrassment" class="inlineimg" /> Aw, thanks. She is also just a wonderful dog to live with. And the OP, she is exactly what I wanted in a dog. If you find a good breeder, you can basically tell them what you are hoping for in your dog, and they will try to make the best match possible. I wanted high energy, highly trainable, one that would go go go, have a good rest, then be ready to go again. And that's what I got - and more. So finding a good breeder, of whatever breed you decide to go with, is key.

I also have to say, there are a number of Brittany spaniels in my neighbourhood. If you are able to give them the kind of exercise they need (ie. tons - and tons of space to run), they are also really great dogs. I love watching them run and run and run in the parks.
Okay I realize this is totally off-topic but speaking of Brittanys I have a hilarious video of a Brittany Spaniel who is owned by one of the employees at our private dog park. She gets the run of the grounds when she's working (beautiful forested areas) and once she sees a bird or a squirrel, she sits down and has LASER FOCUS. Scully will walk up to her and sit next to her and kiss her face and she just keeps staring. It's hilarious and so so cute. Video below.
Thank you for the replies on this everyone. I am glad both breeds can be focused and hard working because that is definitely important to me even though it will mostly just be a pet. I want to do nosework and possibly agility although of course if the dog doesn’t want to that is fine too. But I also just love to train and teach tricks or just randomly do training games or practice obedience throughout the day or practicing when we go places and I like teaching when teachable moments come up so it’s important they’re willing and motivated enough. Though of course I’m not like a jerk or too strict and no downtime ever or anything like that, there’s plenty of fun and playing too, but I would like one that can work when it’s time to work. And from what I’ve read, Labs seem to like working for a reward while Goldens just like doing it cause it’s what you want, maybe you guys said that, but for me, I don’t really mind so much because I think a dog should be rewarded (I certainly wouldn’t want to work for no pay) so I don’t mind giving treats or having a dog that wants to work for a ball or tug toy or whatever. That’s fine by me. Just as long as they have the drive to work and be motivated by SOMETHING, be it praise, toys, food, or otherwise. And of course I’d try to wean off rewards eventually but i don't mind at the beginning. Do you think Labs can ever be off leash? That is probably a loaded question that has tons of variables but I would love to have a dog that I could take hiking or to the field down the road and not have to have a leash on him all the time or dragging a 15, 20, 30, or 50 foot long line behind him for freedom. I think I could have almost any dog well trained though because I love training (working on becoming a dog trainer) and while I haven’t trained very many dogs, the ones I have been Pyrenees mixes that all have a stubborn, independent streak. So I’m used to it lol our dog is a Black Lab/Great Pyrenees and my brother’s dog is a Great Pyrenees/Lab/Boxer and something else (test said 25% unknown, either herding or toy/companion breed. We think maybe BC cause she’s very smart and has an intense stare plus the rescue had originally said Pyrenees/Border Collie but we thought it was just cause of her color). Anyway, Gator and Libby are very very intelligent, learn stuff in a matter of minutes, and love food and toys so it makes it easier. Libby is also more energetic than Gator, proba because of the other breeds mixed in, she’s fairly high energy and super smart. She loves learning. But if she doesn’t want to do something, she will not and Gator is the same way. Finding the right motivation can be challenging. Libby also does not have a great recall and has always been more independent even as a puppy, would rather eat sticks and things in the yard, than be super close to you and not very affectionate. So makes her harder to train, not as people pleasing. At least Gator despite being independent and often in it for himself is more people pleasing. There has to be something in it for Libby. Franklin on the other hand is veryyyyy people pleasing and very sweet, cuddly, and sensitive. He’s actually a little bit of a nervous dog and I’ve been working on getting him less afraid of stuff. But he will do things just to get some love, cuddles, pats, praise, whatever you wanna call it, or his ball. But I think he’d actually rather work for you than for food or the ball, even though he LOVES balls. That personality is definitely very nice to work with. He is supposed to be Pyrenees/Collie but I kind of think he’s part sporting breed just based on how sweet, cuddly, loving he is, his love/obsession with balls, love of water, and he sometimes points, and his coat is a mix of white and reddish gold and is speckled/ticked/whatever on legs and face. They plan on DNA testing him soon. For the record, they are my brother’s and his fiancé’s dogs but they live 2 miles down the road and I walk and train them multiple times a week. They got Libby in February at 12 weeks so she just turned a year old and Franklin they added in September, I think he was 16 weeks. Born in June. He’s 6 months now. Anyway, sorry, I know that was kind of random, but do you think that shows a little bit of the difference between breeds? I know these dogs are mutts but it sounds similar to what you guys were saying. Libby is also more active, has to check everything out first, Franklin and Gator just flop down lol but inside they all settle well and sleep all afternoon after exercise. I think that is ideal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,166 Posts
Speaking from experience, not ALL Goldens are 'soft' compared to Labs. My former field retriever Axl, NEVER met a lab that he couldn't out run, out swim, out jump and work circles around....even @ 8 years old before hemangio cruelly took his life. His single minded drive and ability to focus was legendary, as was his speed, agility, and physical coordination. There was nothing he didn't excel at. It was actually comical to watch him out run and out swim young, fit labs a third his age.

That said, I now have a lab mix rescue (mostly lab) and another field golden. Although the lab is bigger (90 lbs) and physically stronger, little Max (68 lbs) routinely out performs him when it comes to retrieving and especially swimming, it's not even close.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Speaking from experience, not ALL Goldens are 'soft' compared to Labs. My former field retriever Axl, NEVER met a lab that he couldn't out run, out swim, out jump and work circles around....even @ 8 years old before hemangio cruelly took his life. His single minded drive and ability to focus was legendary, as was his speed, agility, and physical coordination. There was nothing he didn't excel at. It was actually comical to watch him out run and out swim young, fit labs a third his age.

That said, I now have a lab mix rescue (mostly lab) and another field golden. Although the lab is bigger (90 lbs) and physically stronger, little Max (68 lbs) routinely out performs him when it comes to retrieving and especially swimming, it's not even close.
Your dogs sound amazing!! I think it’s more the show ones that are little softer and calmer? Field ones are definitely very athletic. From what I understand, field Labs are too so that is surprising. Were they field or show Labs? I was thinking a show/field mix might be good. I really like the looks of this litter, the sire sounds incredible, but I don’t think I’m ready for a puppy so soon. She was bred a couple weeks ago according to their FB page so the puppies probably wouldn’t be ready until at least late March or early April based on normal breeding timeframes but that is still a little bit soon for me. But it sounds like it will be an incredible litter. At least I think so. Thoughts? The first one, the Danno/Truly litter. I think they are also planning another litter but I really like Danno. Although the other one sounds good too.

https://grapevinegoldens.com/litters/
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top