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Ok so we think the lab search is done WOO HOO!!! Pup is in the oven, if there is a female we are good!!! Due any day now. :crossfing

I want to start my golden search MUCH earlier. I want to research on my spare time so in a year when I am ready to buy, I have the hard part done and can contact the hopeful breeders.

I want to know what are "specific" golden clearances to look for and where etc? For instance labs need to be EIC clear (exercise induced collapse) that is huge in labs now. If you use letters please let this doodoo know what they stand for. I know ALL about OFA, I know to look for recent CERF, and CNM, but are there others?

I know I will have SO many more questions as I progress. I just want to know where to begin. Heck we will be busy once we have a lab pup in the house again. They can be terrorists! We didn't call Shadow "Devil Dog" for nothing. Though Belle was never a devil dog, she was probably one of the hardest dogs I had as a young'un. Now I know more about what they need we are ready!
 

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If you want a breeder that follows the Golden Retriever Club of America's Code of Ethics regarding breeding (pretty much considered the gold standard) then here ya go, taken verbatim from the GRCA web site:

ADVISORY GUIDELINES:
Breeding stock should be selected with the objectives of GRCA in mind; that is:

Recognizing that the Golden Retriever breed was developed as a useful gun dog, to encourage the perfection by careful and selective breeding of Golden Retrievers that possess the appearance, structure, soundness, temperament, natural ability and personality that are characterized in the standard of the breed, and to do all possible to advance and promote the perfection of these qualities. (Paraphrased from Article I, Section 2, of the GRCA By-Laws, as amended in 1995.)

GRCA members are expected to follow AKC requirements for record keeping, identification of animals, and registration procedures. Animals selected for breeding should:


(i) be of temperament typical of the Golden Retriever breed; stable, friendly, trainable, and willing to work. Temperament is of utmost importance to the breed and must never be neglected;

(ii) be in good health, including freedom from communicable disease;

(iii) possess the following examination reports in order to verify status concerning possible hip dysplasia, hereditary eye or cardiovascular disease, and elbow dysplasia:


a. Hips – for U.S. dogs, a report from Orthopedic Foundation for Animals; or PennHIP at 24 months of age or older. For dogs outside the U.S., report from a health registry approved by the Golden Retriever club of that country (e.g. Canada - Ontario Veterinary College; Great Britain - BVA/KC Hip Score) A report from the accepted health registry of another country may be used for U.S. dogs that are 24 months of age or older when x-rayed.

b. Eyes – appropriate report from a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmology (ACVO) or from a BVA/KC approved ophthalmologist (Great Britain), or a report from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation. For dogs outside the U.S., a report from an ophthalmologist as recommended by the Golden Retriever club of that country after 1 year of age. Examinations must be done within 12 months of a breeding.

c. Hearts – appropriate report from a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Medicine, Cardiology Specialty or a certification by the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals by a cardiologist (the number will be followed by a C) at 12 months of age or older.

d. Elbows – for U.S. dogs, a report from Orthopedic Foundation for Animals at 24 months of age or older. For dogs outside the U.S., report from a health registry approved by the Golden Retriever club of that country at 24 months of age or older. A report from the accepted health registry of another country may be used for U.S. dogs that are 24 months of age or older when x-rayed.

Breeders of Goldens in the U.S. who use health registries from other countries should fully reveal their reasons for doing so. Consideration should be given also to other disorders that may have a genetic component, including, but not limited to, epilepsy, hypothyroidism, skin disorders (allergies), and orthopedic disorders such as osteochondritis.

(iv) Assuming all health and examination reports are favorable, the age of the breeding pair also is of consideration. Generally, a Golden Retriever is not physically and mentally mature until the age of 2 years; an individual dog’s suitability as a breeding animal is difficult to assess until that time.

Adopted: April 20, 1997, by GRCA Board of Directors.(Rev. 5-01, 2-08)
 

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Barley & Mira's Mom
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This is what I personally would be looking for

Absolutely must have
OFA Hips
OFA Elbows
OFA Heart (done by cardiologist)
CERF Eyes
Optigen PRA-prcd (Progressive Retinal Atrophy - one type of hereditary eye disease causing blindness - at least one parent must be clear)

Would like to see
Thyroid Panel

I would also be looking at but no formal testing for
Temperament
Allergies
Cancer/longevity
 

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More and more people are doing thyroid and patella clearances. I don't know much about those two, but you might do some research and ask some of the breeders around here. The four biggies, as stated above, are hips, eyes, elbows and heart.
 

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bumping up
 
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