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We are looking for a Golden Retriever/Chesapeake Bay Retriever mix.... we have always had Chessies in our family and love them - but were told that a mix Golden/Chessy were great (any thoughts? anyone now of pups with this mix?)

Thank you
 

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Kate
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I can't fathom why you would mix the two completely different breeds.

Aside from the bigger point of it being crappy deliberately mixing breeds.

I would never get a CBR - among else, every single one that I've met from a BYB is a nasty dog (dog aggressive, suspicious of people they don't know). I'm sure well-bred ones are nice? But you're not going to get the breeders/owners of well-bred ones dabbling in ruining their reputation by mutt-breeding.
 

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Kristy
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If you all have always loved the chessies you have had, what traits do you think a GOlden would bring to the mix that would improve on the breed? I know a couple well bred chessies that are good dogs, but they are so different from the Goldens I know, I can't imagine what would make this cross appealing. And I'm with Megora, breeders with really nice representatives of either breed would NEVER purposefully cross breed them.
 

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I know that this particular topic could end up in heated discussion. Please let's be courteous and respectful to one another.
And for the record, I bear hunted with a guide who especially liked Plott hound crosses. I also hunted with a person whose family had a guiding business for quail. And their favorite dogs were pointing dog crosses. May not be my choices but different strokes for different folk.
 

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Kate
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https://www.grca.org/find-a-golden/more-topics-before-you-buy/goldendoodles/

I think this applies to any mixed breeds. If you are a breeder, you really should not be supporting this.

"The Golden Retriever Club of America is opposed to cross-breeding of dogs and is particularly opposed to the deliberate crossing of Golden Retrievers with any other breed. These crossbreds are a deliberate attempt to mislead the public with the idea that there is an advantage to these designer dogs. The crossbred dogs are prone to all of the genetic disease of both breeds and offer none of the advantages that owning a purebred dog has to offer."
 

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I had the same reaction, other than the usual why of it, that every single CBR I have ever met outside of a dog show and some at dog shows had terrible temperaments. Maybe this person wants the Golden to tone that down...
 
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Just a reminder for everyone posting in this thread-

You may disagree with the viewpoints of other members, please be respectful in your replies. There is no need to be rude and/or disrespectful.

If it continues, this thread may end up being closed due to continued Rule Violations.
 

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I also concur that have not met a CBR that was good with other dogs, strange dogs. That is one of the reasons I wanted a Golden. I wanted a dog that I could take everywhere and would love everyone/everything. I know there are some that don't but it is one of the traits that is recognized for the breed. Maybe that is why they would want to cross?

Jules
 

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Kate
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I also concur that have not met a CBR that was good with other dogs, strange dogs. That is one of the reasons I wanted a Golden. I wanted a dog that I could take everywhere and would love everyone/everything. I know there are some that don't but it is one of the traits that is recognized for the breed. Maybe that is why they would want to cross?
Was thinking about all the breeds out there who are absolutely wonderful - albeit different than both goldens and chessies, but have the attributes of both breeds (better hunting drive X sweet dogs typically).

Labs. There's two very good reasons why they are top dog in the country. First they are very common, most are sold on full registration and they are easy to come by - so lots of people registering their dogs so they can breed them. But they are also wonderful dogs. You get some out there who holy crud are not nice dogs. But generally they are trustworthy family dogs.

There's a FB video going around out there which I swear I sit and watch each time a friend shares it. It's a lab that went MIA overnight.... and came running back to the owners across a field, followed by 2 buddies it apparently made in its travels. Another lab and a goat. And they all piled into the owner's truck.

I just basically laugh and grin every single time I see that video. :laugh:

Because we have all known labs like that - even from byb's out there.

Going into more unique breeds - you have curly coated retrievers who are somewhat like chessies (not as crazy outgoing as goldens and labs), but they have not been as overbred by careless people.

Golden retrievers are the other breed that anyone looking for a dog - might want to look into. Purebred goldens. This is the best breed of all the breeds out there. These are outgoing, happy, kind, and intelligent dogs. They love being with their people. They are not chain to a dog house outside types of dogs. Most retrievers aren't. And I suspect part of the reason why those chessies that I've know were as EVIL as they were - had a lot to do with them being kept outside and learning to fend for themselves. You have some of the protective and suspicious breed traits coming out full blast with dogs kept like that.

Other thing and I can't say enough. People are mixing breeds with the story that if you want a breed like X and Y - then you just get a XY breed. And in this case, the danger is you might get a dog who looks like a golden - but is very dominant and possibly aggressive towards other dogs and unfriendly to strangers. Which is a formula for disaster because a lot of people trust goldens because of the temperament they are known for. You might be trying to fix the temperament of the common bred CBR's... but you might end up with the same temperment in a golden type dog.

There's a scary example of that which I saw recently where somebody was selling golden retriever X pit bull mix puppies. And I just thought that was the most tragic thing ever.

The thing I posted and linked above is really true - you can't mix breeds without losing a lot that you can get with the actual purebred breeds. That's why it would be better looking into getting another chessie... or looking into getting a golden retriever. Or look into one of the other retriever breeds if there's a reason why you are trying to get away from CBR's.

BTW - posting all of this is out of affection for this breed (Golden Retrievers). I would happily say the same to anyone sitting down talking to them. Meaning, I'm not saying anything offensive or obnoxious. I completely want people to get back to looking into all the different AKC breeds, learning about them, and exploring that whole world of dogs. As opposed to scrapping old and true for something new.
 

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I happen to like both breeds. My son has a yellow lab that is often compared to a CBR attitude wise. He is a hunting guide. I definitely would not cross the breeds. I think it could take away from the qualities of the CBR you love, and diminish the qualities you are trying to attain from the Golden. Pick your breed and stay with it.

If you hunt, and I own Golden's that hunt, I think you buy a Golden for the specific temperament and a Chessie is the exact opposite. Just my two cents.

I heard an interesting story just yesterday about a guy that had always bred yellow labs for hunting. He went out west on a hunting trip and was impressed with a Labradoodle. This was several years ago so they weren't as common as they are now. He bought a standard poodle and bred a litter, both with good lines and did the testing for each breed. He sold two out of eight dogs. He still to this day has two labs, one standard poodle and one labradoodle. He gave away five of the puppies good homes. He says the labradoodle is the dumbest dog he's ever owned. I'm not trying to be negative. I've never owned any type of doodle, but I honestly had this conversation yesterday.
 

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There can be benefits to breeding a Lab and a Golden, but it would be specific to the dogs involved and to the purpose - usually for service dog work. However, I'd expect to see this by a service dog organization with experience in such mixes, not from a private breeder. Since these are deliberate pairings, the dogs have been health screened and selected for temperament. So, if you had the opportunity to adopt a Lab-Golden cross that washed out of service dog work then you might get yourself a delightful pet.

My only concern about a Chessie/Golden mix is that, except in the rarest of cases, it probably wasn't a deliberate pairing so one or both parents might be dogs that shouldn't have been bred in the first place (health reasons, temperament, etc.).

If you're truly interested in this combination, I'd proceed very carefully and ensure that each parent dog met the breeding standards of the organization representing that breed (GRCA and whoever it is for Chessies). I would imagine that in these cases both parents are on site (As has been discussed widely on this forum - often times with a Golden to Golden breeding the male probably won't be on site since many breeders will use a stud dog other than their own.) so I'd ask to see them so that you can at least eyeball them for personality and the care they're receiving.

And, I'd watch shelters. You might find a random one turn up. Once a dog is in a shelter I think it deserves a chance at a good life, regardless of one's opinion on the appropriateness of the pairing.

You could also talk with your local Golden Retriever rescue group and your local group that rescues Chessies in case either group comes across such a dog.
 

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I've met 3 Chessie's. 2 were running Hunt tests along with my golden and were great dogs but both were fairly independent and the male was completely in business for himself. The owners adored both of their dogs and obviously put a lot of training into them but man it was hard go get that stubborn boy to listen. The 3rd is a dog my husband has hunted with. He'll attack people if his owner is not around and tried to go after my super easy going neutered male. Archer put him in his place, but we don't make Archer out with that dog anymore. I'm afraid the stubborn, sometimes aggressive temperament would be strong and come out even if mixed with a golden. If like the Golden's temperament, get a purebred. If you like Chessie's, just get a nice chessie imo.
 

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Interesting subject. I grew up with English Setters and pointers--we were quail hunters. I got my first dog, an English Setter pup for my 11th birthday--opted for it over a watch. We never had an aggressive setter or pointer. They were otusdie dogs, but we kids used them as pack horses, to pull the little wagon, etc when we played in the fields. They would eat out of the same pan with no problem. I lost my last English Setter in '88 (21 years after I got my first) and strangely enough, ain Irish Setter showed up in our yard.


This Irish was thin, had a cut on his hip, lots of fleas, some ticks, no collar, not ads in paper for lost Irish, no posters. He was extremely smart--he would let us know when one of the masters got out of it's cage. He and my rabbit woudl both sleep in the bed with me when hubby was o t he road. Had him 8 years and then oldest son's girl friend got me an Irish puppy and I had him 12 1/2 years before bone cancer took him. both of these Irish setters were extremely oving and loved everyone they met. And both very smart. Then in '94 my son got a golden puppy to train as a duck dog and Scooter was retrieving at 6 months. Since then I have had 5 more goldens, form 1 to 4 at a time. And throw in two Great Pyrenees. They were extremely people friendly, especially kids. They are noted for roaming, but that is the only fault I found with them


Now my DILK had a Chessie (she called Trixie "dried grass color") and she didn't want anyone near her when she ate, and she was not dog friendly. Was great around folks when she was not eating...tho standoffish until she knew you. I believe you can bad in any breed--I have been lucky with all the dogs I have had no trouble..with the exception of one golden was grouchy til we discovered low thyroid, got him on meds, and then he was a normal happy golden. Trixie is the only Chessie I have been around and never been around a mix. But I do not think I would want a mix. But this is just me.
 

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We are looking for a Golden Retriever/Chesapeake Bay Retriever mix.... we have always had Chessies in our family and love them - but were told that a mix Golden/Chessy were great (any thoughts? anyone now of pups with this mix?)

Thank you
I’m not expert in dog breeding, but from what lots of people are saying, it might not be best to look for this crossbreed. However, i have a Lab X Chessie mix and it is an amazing breed that truly exhibits all the best qualities of the two breeds and none of the negative ones. If you don’t believe me and think my dog is a rare case, do some google research on Chesadors as a breed and make your decision from there. I truly love this breed and I don’t plan on getting any other breed for a very long time. He is very sociable with all people and dogs and is also protective when he feels that someone is threatening me or the other members of my household. Oh, and no one will come in or around your house without this dog noticing so be prepared for a bit of unnecessary barking.
 

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I would be very wary about getting a cross between two breeds if you had any concerns about behavioural issues in either breed ( disregarding general concerns about cross-breeding).
In more than half a century involved in the “dog world” I’ve noticed that behavioural issues seem to pass very strongly from parents to offspring - with the exception of nervousness, which often seems to catch breeders by surprise when it skips a generation. I would not expect that breeding a dog with behavioural issues to a dog without issues would “dilute” the issues in the offspring.
 

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Kate
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I’m not expert in dog breeding, but from what lots of people are saying, it might not be best to look for this crossbreed. However, i have a Lab X Chessie mix and it is an amazing breed that truly exhibits all the best qualities of the two breeds and none of the negative ones. If you don’t believe me and think my dog is a rare case, do some google research on Chesadors as a breed and make your decision from there. I truly love this breed and I don’t plan on getting any other breed for a very long time. He is very sociable with all people and dogs and is also protective when he feels that someone is threatening me or the other members of my household. Oh, and no one will come in or around your house without this dog noticing so be prepared for a bit of unnecessary barking.
It's not a breed. It's MUTT.

People who breed them are make MUTTTTTTTS and nothing else. There's no point in making a mix between the two other than you had odds and ends that you're breeding together to make puppies that hopefully won't end up in a kill shelter because nobody wants them (a lot of them do as adult dogs)..

If you have a nice dog that supposedly has the best of both breeds behind it and none of the bad things - that's a happy accident and good for you.
 
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