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Hi - it has been a while since I posted here. Our girl Maya just turned 5 on December 1. Last summer, we noticed a slight limp in her hind leg. X rays revealed slight arthritis and early onset of hip dysplasia. We were told the best thing we could do for her is have her lose weight. She weighed in at 79 lbs then. We were advised to bring her down to the early 70s. Mission accomplished.

However, we have seen a slight limp every now and then the last few days. Its very slight, usually when she just wakes up from a nap. It breaks my heart to see her in any discomfort.

Are there any supplements someone would recommend? Glucosamine, for example? We're also contemplating adding CBD oil to her diet as she can be a little high strung and we've heard it may be of use. Does anyone have recommendations for these two supplements and anything else we should consider giving her?

Would be most grateful for any advice!
 

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Look into Nupro joint supplement. It works wonders. Glucosamine it's not in itself anything to great for joint care. You want it as it's a lubricant for the joint but you want MSM in there as well as chondroitin and vitamin C. That is why Nupro, they use a better vitamin C called Ester-C.

The CBD... I haven't gotten involved in that for dogs so someone will need to chime in on that. I'd look for studies on that and effects on dogs
 

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As you were advised, weight loss is very important. Good work on making that happen. We have been on that for months and it has been a slow process. Oscar has a disk issue and we are using glucosamine. That and visits to the chiropractor have been very beneficial.
 

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When our older guy had some elbow arthritis the vet recommended cosequin, it did seem to help. He was already on rimadyl as needed and swimming also helped a lot to keep him strong without the weight on his joints. I also tried laser therapy with an arthritic basset hound and it really improved her comfort.
 

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For joints we are using Synovi. For years I used Sasha blend but the vet said the Synovi is much better. Here is the link
https://www.bayerdvm.com/products/synovi-g4-soft-chews/
I purchase it from US now as the price of this supplement is ridiculously high in Ontario comparing to what I can get from US, saving more than 50%.

For CBD I don't know what the rules are in your state. Here in Ontario I get a high quality, full spectrum CBD from a licensed producer. It is prescribed in my name as CBD is not approved for animal use (but this may change). One of my dogs suffers from seizures or some sort of neurological movement issue, but I can tell CBD works well. Also CBD works nicely for me, I have a torn ACL so in a bit of a pain. There is no point to direct you to my provider, as you will not have any use of this, but try to find a licensed provider for humans or maybe a non licensed provider who does some testing of their products to ensure you are getting quality of CBD rather than just an expensive coconut oil.
 

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I think the CBD is this generation's miracle fish oil. I see some slick advertising claiming it cures all things and so on. There's really no regulation that I've seen so far? And no studies concerning long term consistent medication with it. But have heard along the grapevine that there ARE negative side effects depending on what you're giving the dogs from where and how much.

I think a lot of people are so eager for a quick fix or miracle cure for a lot of different things that they give their dogs stuff that has not been thoroughly tested for long term use.

That's a caution note re CBD oil or any of the variety of herbal remedies that are increasingly pushed out there promising all kinds of cures.

Re glucosamine - I give my guys glycoflex III chews.

Also recommend that you take your dog to a rehab vet and have thoroughly checked out. Many times if a dog is limping people assume it's hips or elbows, but it could be muscle injuries which have caused kinks in the neck or back.

A chiropractor alone isn't always advisable because there are chiropractors who will adjust backs but not address the reasons why a dog's back needed adjusting. If dog is sound and shows no signs of injury, a simple adjustment is fine - and repeat every 3-4 months or so. But if there's a muscle injury and the dog is sore, he will need more care. This includes heat/cold therapy and massages at home and laser therapy and chiropractic adjustments there at the vet.


Our girl Maya just turned 5 on December 1. Last summer, we noticed a slight limp in her hind leg. X rays revealed slight arthritis and early onset of hip dysplasia.
One note...

Dogs are born with bad elbows or hips. Typically most people have no idea as long as the dogs stay sound. And most young dogs exhibit no sign or symptom.

Typical point when arthritis starts to develop (degerative joint disease) is around 5 years old. So with your dog - there really was no early onset. She simply started showing signs of arthritis at an age when it typically shows up.

Assuming she just has moderate hip dysplasia at this point - should not affect her quality of life. She should continue going for walks, get her swimming and look into hydrotherapy if you can afford it. Build up and maintain her muscles to keep her strong and young.

And considering she's a bitch and not a boy - I think you might want to continue getting her weight down. Unless she's the same size as a male dog, she should technically not be the same weight as males. Getting her down to 68-70 might be ideal... but I'd dip into the upper 60's.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I think the CBD is this generation's miracle fish oil. I see some slick advertising claiming it cures all things and so on. There's really no regulation that I've seen so far? And no studies concerning long term consistent medication with it. But have heard along the grapevine that there ARE negative side effects depending on what you're giving the dogs from where and how much.

I think a lot of people are so eager for a quick fix or miracle cure for a lot of different things that they give their dogs stuff that has not been thoroughly tested for long term use.

That's a caution note re CBD oil or any of the variety of herbal remedies that are increasingly pushed out there promising all kinds of cures.

Re glucosamine - I give my guys glycoflex III chews.

Also recommend that you take your dog to a rehab vet and have thoroughly checked out. Many times if a dog is limping people assume it's hips or elbows, but it could be muscle injuries which have caused kinks in the neck or back.

A chiropractor alone isn't always advisable because there are chiropractors who will adjust backs but not address the reasons why a dog's back needed adjusting. If dog is sound and shows no signs of injury, a simple adjustment is fine - and repeat every 3-4 months or so. But if there's a muscle injury and the dog is sore, he will need more care. This includes heat/cold therapy and massages at home and laser therapy and chiropractic adjustments there at the vet.




One note...

Dogs are born with bad elbows or hips. Typically most people have no idea as long as the dogs stay sound. And most young dogs exhibit no sign or symptom.

Typical point when arthritis starts to develop (degerative joint disease) is around 5 years old. So with your dog - there really was no early onset. She simply started showing signs of arthritis at an age when it typically shows up.

Assuming she just has moderate hip dysplasia at this point - should not affect her quality of life. She should continue going for walks, get her swimming and look into hydrotherapy if you can afford it. Build up and maintain her muscles to keep her strong and young.

And considering she's a bitch and not a boy - I think you might want to continue getting her weight down. Unless she's the same size as a male dog, she should technically not be the same weight as males. Getting her down to 68-70 might be ideal... but I'd dip into the upper 60's.
We found out about Maya's arthritis (mild) in her spine, and signs of hip dysplasia last June, so when she was 3.5 years old. For about 3-4 months she was diagnosed as having a soft tissue sprain. We consulted an orthopedic vet and got the diagnosis.

Maya was 79 lbs at that time. We were very careful with the portioning (always erred on the lower end of recommendations) and she was an active dog, yet she gained weight. We changed her diet and now she weighs in at 65 lbs. The drop in weight made a world of difference.

But there's no ignoring her imminent health issues. Living in the northeast, we can't get her out to swim in the winter months. We'll look into hydrotherapy. I probably know the answer to this already, but what would you do about aerobic exercise? Like any other golden, she loves to play fetch. But we can't keep it up to the detriment of her health. She'll keep getting walks and we'll up her swimming in the spring, summer, and fall. But how do we keep up her quality of life in the winter? This is what really worries me.

We were first time dog owners when we brought her into our lives. Most definitely she doesn't come from a breeder who cared enough to check for elbow/hip issues. But she's a beautiful soul and our mission is to keep her happy and healthy.

We opted for Nupro joint and immunity as a couple of other folks also recommended it to us. The CBD was more for anxiety which she exhibits from time to time, depending on the situation.
 

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We found out about Maya's arthritis (mild) in her spine, and signs of hip dysplasia last June, so when she was 3.5 years old. For about 3-4 months she was diagnosed as having a soft tissue sprain. We consulted an orthopedic vet and got the diagnosis.

Maya was 79 lbs at that time. We were very careful with the portioning (always erred on the lower end of recommendations) and she was an active dog, yet she gained weight. We changed her diet and now she weighs in at 65 lbs. The drop in weight made a world of difference.

But there's no ignoring her imminent health issues. Living in the northeast, we can't get her out to swim in the winter months. We'll look into hydrotherapy. I probably know the answer to this already, but what would you do about aerobic exercise? Like any other golden, she loves to play fetch. But we can't keep it up to the detriment of her health. She'll keep getting walks and we'll up her swimming in the spring, summer, and fall. But how do we keep up her quality of life in the winter? This is what really worries me.

We were first time dog owners when we brought her into our lives. Most definitely she doesn't come from a breeder who cared enough to check for elbow/hip issues. But she's a beautiful soul and our mission is to keep her happy and healthy.

We opted for Nupro joint and immunity as a couple of other folks also recommended it to us. The CBD was more for anxiety which she exhibits from time to time, depending on the situation.



I had a couple friends buy used treadmills which has the give for low impact on the joints and taught their dogs to walk/trot on it in the winter months. kept them in shape and trim in the winter months and i believe it kept them a little limber instead of tightening up with inactivity. If it was a walk I believe it was a couple times a day for about 10-15 min and trots were just 5 min
 

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We changed her diet and now she weighs in at 65 lbs.
Excellent<:

But there's no ignoring her imminent health issues. Living in the northeast, we can't get her out to swim in the winter months. We'll look into hydrotherapy. I probably know the answer to this already, but what would you do about aerobic exercise? Like any other golden, she loves to play fetch. But we can't keep it up to the detriment of her health. She'll keep getting walks and we'll up her swimming in the spring, summer, and fall. But how do we keep up her quality of life in the winter? This is what really worries me.
Let her be a dog. Let her run in the snow, let her play fetch, if we have mid-winter thaws - let her go swimming if she wants.

Hydrotherapy - I know a lot of people swear by it.

If she has spondylitis - I'd definitely find a good rehab vet who can help you maintain back stuff for you. If she has bone changes probably in the lumbar region, she probably will need routine adjustments at the chiropractor. If rehab vet, they will also do a physical exam each time and you can have them check out different areas which seem to be sore.

If your dog is slow to sit, or uncomfortable about eating off the floor, etc.... make adjustments at home (raised food and water bowls), but discuss this with a rehab vet.

Check at your agility training club - especially if there's high level trainers there. They'll know the best rehab vets and hydrotherapy locations to go to in your area.

But anyway - to put this into perspective. My Jacks had bilateral hip dysplasia. It was mild and identified when he was about 30 months old. He was never symptomatic and right through the end of his life he was very sound, very strong, and very athletic.

He did have a certain injury to his rear when young Bertie rammed right through him and sent him flying into a ditch. That was when we did pretty aggressive laser therapy, hot and cold compresses, and massages, and routine adjustments for the rest of his life.

A month before he died, I'd had him in for his routine visit with our chiropractor (who is a rehab vet) and she was thrilled over how good his back was. He literally just had 1 adjustment, which considering he was a very active boy who roughhoused and played with our other dogs multiple times a day, every day, and insisted on going for his 3 mile walks every day.... that was big deal. He was never on pain meds and only getting glycoflex III every day.

We are upper midwest here in Michigan, but winter is not 3 months long from start to finish. Worst month is usually January. Other than January, we get many thaws where the dogs get to go out and swim even.
 

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With both my senior dogs-Pug and Golden- I had great results with Dasuquin Advanced by Nutramaxx.

https://www.dasuquin.com/en/dasuquin-advanced-soft-chews/

It was a true lifesaver for my Golden girl because I wasn’t able to lift her up and down the stairs. For a young dog with few symptoms, I would probably start out with regular Dasuquin and only move to Advanced when the Regular no longer works.

My old girl was on the Advanced plus Rimadyl towards the end.

I also use CBD oil for my Crested with metastatic mammary cancer. I am pleased with how she is doing but can’t necessarily attribute that to the CBD oil, as she is also on Pred.

I can say that I gave it to my other Crested, who is very nippy with people other than me, before her last grooming appointment and it was amazing! The groomer said she was chill even through having her face shaved and her toenails trimmed.

There is an excellent Facebook Group for this. They have some learning units that were very helpful on how to select an oil and what to look for. Plus, they also have discount codes.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/cbdoilforpets/

I have used Charlotte’s Web (hate the dropper, which provides an inconsistent dose) and NuLeaf (stronger, so requires less.)
 

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Hi - it has been a while since I posted here. Our girl Maya just turned 5 on December 1. Last summer, we noticed a slight limp in her hind leg. X rays revealed slight arthritis and early onset of hip dysplasia. We were told the best thing we could do for her is have her lose weight. She weighed in at 79 lbs then. We were advised to bring her down to the early 70s. Mission accomplished.

However, we have seen a slight limp every now and then the last few days. Its very slight, usually when she just wakes up from a nap. It breaks my heart to see her in any discomfort.

Are there any supplements someone would recommend? Glucosamine, for example? We're also contemplating adding CBD oil to her diet as she can be a little high strung and we've heard it may be of use. Does anyone have recommendations for these two supplements and anything else we should consider giving her?


Would be most grateful for any advice!
My 14.5 yr old Border Collie was about to be taken to the vet for her final trip to the bridge. She was going downhill very fast. I decided to try some human grade CBD oil from a local dispensary just to see. Low and behold, that was over 2 months ago and she is like a new dog! No illusions at 14.5, but at least she is happy and playing again. There was NOTHING to lose and I am thankful for whatever extra time she has been given.

There are TONS of positive of articles all over the net. Make sure that you are not reading a cleverly disguised advertisement for a "miracle" cure. (usually Baloney).There are apparently NO serious side effects; unlike most of those from Big Pharma meds.
Here are 2:
https://www.holistapet.com/potential-side-effects-of-cbd-for-dogs-and-cats/


https://www.petmd.com/dog/care/whats-latest-using-cbd-pet-anxiety-and-pain


Big Phama CURRENTLY has a vested interest in spreading falsehoods about something that can replace their expensive and sometimes harmful drugs (for PEOPLE TOO!). This is about to change, as they get ever closer at synthesizing the over 500 Cannabinoids that make Cannabis what it is. IF and when that happens,; the "stigma" and mis-information will mysteriously cease. Much of their "research" is done in South America to avoid the FDA in the USA (for the time being, as even the feds are changing....with patents in hand....:grin2:)

I also have been giving her this, with a MONEY BACK guarantee! (love it).
https://www.chewy.com/liquid-vet-hip-joint-dog-supplement/dp/163915?utm_source=google-product&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=f&utm_content=Liquid-Vet&utm_term=&gclid=CjwKCAiAlajvBRB_EiwA4vAqiNI9TWYnKH359hWzxKAgaMQeUrBMytDa6O1dGm1NJneI7seo6JGW5xoCKAEQAvD_BwE

The bottem line is that CBD CAN be of great help with many conditions, but is not a miracle. The "special" dog CBD is usually 2-4 times the price of the human CBD found in dispensarys.

There was a thread with a huge number of reads on CBD for dogs, and other stuff (it was shut down unfortunately). TONS of LEGAL information is contained within that thread.
https://www.goldenretrieverforum.com/golden-retrievers-main-discussion/511736-goldens-their-owners-dare-different.html
 

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There has been a lot of discussion about using CBD oil or CBD products both here on the Forum and on many sites.

Use caution when reading information, when you're researching information, visit Reputable websites such as the FDA, CDC, or Veterinary Medical School Websites. There are a lot of websites that are not reputable.

Check your State's laws, CBD oil/products are illegal in many States.

Here is some recent information from the FDA-

https://www.fda.gov/news-events/public-health-focus/fda-regulation-cannabis-and-cannabis-derived-products-including-cannabidiol-cbd#statesallowing


Pets and other Animals
24. I’ve seen cannabis products being marketed for pets. Are they safe?

A. FDA is aware of some cannabis products being marketed as animal health products. We want to stress that FDA has not approved cannabis for any use in animals, and the agency cannot ensure the safety or effectiveness of these products. For these reasons, FDA cautions pet-owners against the use of such products and recommends that you talk with your veterinarian about appropriate treatment options for your pet.

Signs that your pet may be suffering adverse effects from ingesting cannabis may include lethargy, depression, heavy drooling, vomiting, agitation, tremors, and convulsions.

If you have concerns that your pet is suffering adverse effects from ingesting cannabis or any substance containing cannabis, consult your veterinarian, local animal emergency hospital or an animal poison control center immediately.

While the agency is aware of reports of pets consuming various forms of cannabis, to date, FDA has not directly received any reports of adverse events associated with animals given cannabis products. However, adverse events from accidental ingestion are well-documented in scientific literature. If you feel your animal has suffered from ingesting cannabis, we encourage you to report the adverse event to the FDA. Please visit Reporting Information about Animal Drugs and Devices to learn more about how to report an adverse event related to an animal drug or for how to report an adverse event or problem with a pet food.

25. Can hemp be added to animal food?

A. All ingredients in animal food must be the subject of an approved food additive petition or generally recognized as safe (GRAS) for their intended use in the intended species. If an animal food contains an ingredient that is not the subject of an approved food additive petition or GRAS for its intended use in the intended species, that animal food would be adulterated under section 402(a)(2)(C)(i) of the FD&C Act [21 U.S.C. § 342(a)(2)(C)(i)]. In coordination with state feed control officials, CVM also recognizes ingredients listed in the Official Publication (OP) of the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) as being acceptable for use in animal food. At this time, there are no approved food additive petitions or ingredient definitions listed in the AAFCO OP for any substances derived from hemp, and we are unaware of any GRAS conclusions regarding the use of any substances derived from hemp in animal food. Learn more about animal food ingredient submissions here.

With respect to products labeled to contain "hemp" that may also contain THC or CBD, as mentioned above it is a prohibited act under section 301(ll) of the FD&C Act to introduce or deliver for introduction into interstate commerce any animal food to which THC or CBD has been added.

26. Can approved human drugs containing CBD or synthetic THC be used extralabel in animals?

A. The Animal Medicinal Drug Use Clarification Act of 1994 (AMDUCA), permits veterinarians to prescribe extralabel uses of approved human and animal drugs for animals under certain conditions. Extralabel use must comply with all the provisions of AMDUCA and its implementing regulation at 21 CFR § 530. Among other limitations, these provisions allow extralabel use of a drug only on the lawful order of a licensed veterinarian in the context of a valid veterinarian-client-patient relationship and only in circumstances when the health of an animal is threatened or suffering, or death may result from failure to treat.

In addition, under 21 CFR 530.20, extralabel use of an approved human drug in a food-producing animal is not permitted if an animal drug approved for use in food-producing animals can be used in an extralabel manner for the use. In addition, under 21 CFR 530.20(b)(2), if scientific information on the human food safety aspect of the use of the approved human drug in food-producing animals is not available, the veterinarian must take appropriate measures to ensure that the animal and its food products will not enter the human food supply.
For more information on extralabel use of FDA approved drugs in animals, see Extralabel Use of FDA Approved Drugs In Animals.
More information can be found on the FDA's website-

https://www.fda.gov/consumers/consumer-updates/what-you-need-know-and-what-were-working-find-out-about-products-containing-cannabis-or-cannabis
 

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My first Golden started with arthritis when she was six. By the time she was ten her paws were huge and gnarly and she had spondylosis in her back (x-rays showed several fused vertebrae). By the time we lost her at 13.5 we had her on opioid pain killers (tramadol I think), but... she was still doing agility class (just low jumps and tunnels) and Rally and chasing balls up until a few weeks before she died.

Here's what we did:
*I put her on a raw diet (to get rid of the carbs, which can make inflammation worse)
*I kept her lean and exercised
*She saw a holistic vet monthly for acupuncture and chiropractic and laser and whatever else the vet felt she needed
*She got some vitamin C supplements, as well as fish oil
*She was on a product called "Longevity" from Springtime, Inc., which includes some joint supplements like glucosamine
*I had her on a herbal Cox2 inhibitor called "Zyflammend" (I didn't want to risk the side effects that sometimes come up with the use of the more common NSAIDs, like Rimadyl or Deramax)

My bible was a website called Dog Aware, which has a TON of information about treating arthritis (the author had a Shar Pei with bad arthritis).
 

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Regarding CBD oil, my vet recommended Canna Pet CBD oil Max tincture. Canna Pet has a quality control on their products. If you sign up for their emails you can get up to a 30% discount on products. My 15 year old golden took 3 to 4 drops 3 times daily to help with arthritic pain along with Galliprant.
 

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Our Sophie was 11 yrs 5 weeks old when we adopted her. Her original owners were moving from TX to MN and didn't think she could handle the winters up there. She had had arthritis in her hips and knees. I puthe on Cosequin and it really helped for a while. When after more than a year, it started to not work as well, we went to Adequan injections and they really helped her a lot. However, she had only been on them about 3 months when hemangiosarcoa took he.

e adopted our Great Pyrenees, Princess Jewel last Feb. at age 9 yrs. 9 months. She has some arthritis and is on the Cosequin, light dose, but also gts Adequan injections. Nothing is a "cure", but keeping weight down and these sups do hlp. Oh, she also gts a TBS of organic coconut oil in hr food every day for fur & skin & heart, and perhaps it helps hr joints as well, I don't know.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thank you everyone for your advice and recommendations. I appreciate it. Maya started Nupro Joint & Immunity recently and we'll see how that goes. I'll do some more research on CBD oil before committing to it. I'm also looking into hydrotherapy. Maya is a total water baby, so that's something she would love.
 

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Thank you everyone for your advice and recommendations. I appreciate it. Maya started Nupro Joint & Immunity recently and we'll see how that goes. I'll do some more research on CBD oil before committing to it. I'm also looking into hydrotherapy. Maya is a total water baby, so that's something she would love.
Your Vet may be able to recommend some places that have Hydro Therapy for dogs. There's a really nice facility in my area. Your Vet may also be able to recommend some other treatment options as well.
 
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