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Hi all...
I'm new to this forum, and I'm getting a golden retriever puppy next week, he will be about 8 weeks or so. I've been searching mostly everything about taking care a puppy. However, I'm still a bit confused.

Most of the sources said that when I crate train him, most of the puppy would cry..especially during 2-3 nights because of the new environment. And most of the sources said, I should let her cry during the night. But what about if the puppy want to go potty or pee?

How do I know if he really cry from the new environment or wanting to go pee?

Any advice for a new pet owner?

Thanks
 

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Now Caue's Dad Too!
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Welcome to the forum. There is no way to tell between the needing to potty and just wanting out. I would suggest that you take your pup out once in the middle of the night with no playing or treats. Just out to the lawn and then right back in the crate. Best of luck to you.
 

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Depending on when you go to bed I would agree with Oakly's Dad. We go to bed about 11:30 so I got up with our new boy about 3:00 and 6:00 am. By thirteen weeks he was sleeping all the way from 12:00 midnight until 9:00 a.m. If you go to bed at 9:00 pm or 10:00 pm you may have to initially add a second middle of the night outing. For a 9:00 pm bedtime I would take him out at midnight and 3:00 a.m. It won't take but just a few weeks until your nighttime adventures decrease in frequency. Good luck!!
 

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We crated our puppy next to our bed and he never cried at all except to go out to potty a few times the first few nights. He's a very people-oriented dog, and I don't think he missed his littermates all that much. Lucky for us.
 

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Crating next to the bed should be suspended once the puppy can hold it all night. Studies show in general continued crating of puppy in the master bedroom creates a whole array of other problems associated with separation anxiety.

NOTICE TO OTHER POSTERS: Please do not reply to say that you kept your puppy in your master bedroom without problems. Studies report on tendencies that are more likely that not to happen. Good for you if you avoided those problems. But consider it luck and no more. Unfortunately you don't know if you will be lucky until it is too late.
 

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Wyatt Earp
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Hi all...
I'm new to this forum, and I'm getting a golden retriever puppy next week, he will be about 8 weeks or so. I've been searching mostly everything about taking care a puppy. However, I'm still a bit confused.

Most of the sources said that when I crate train him, most of the puppy would cry..especially during 2-3 nights because of the new environment. And most of the sources said, I should let her cry during the night. But what about if the puppy want to go potty or pee?

How do I know if he really cry from the new environment or wanting to go pee?

Any advice for a new pet owner?

Thanks
It all depends on the pup if he will wimper or cry. Take him out right before he goes to bed and once in the middle of the night. We never crated we did this with him in the x pen and Wyatt wimpered maybe once or twice the first nite and that was it. Crates can be put wherever it is most convenient for you and your pup. Our well adjusted dog sleeps on the floor right next to our bed every night now.
 

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I think it depends on when he whimpers and cries. If you've just let him out and he is crying then ignore him. If he wakes up in the middle of the night then let him out (with as little stimulation as possible) and put him back in the crate.
 

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Crates can be put wherever it is most convenient for you and your pup. Our well adjusted dog sleeps on the floor right next to our bed every night now.
As I expected. You can put them wherever you want as long as you are willing to live with the possible outcome based on studies. So the OP can decide whether she wants to follow the results of studies on numerous dogs or the advice of a poster who has a history of offering advice and dismissing studies acting as if how her dog reacted is the only truth.
 

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Wyatt Earp
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As I expected. You can put them wherever you want as long as you are willing to live with the possible outcome based on studies. So the OP can decide whether she wants to follow the results of studies on numerous dogs or the advice of a poster who has a history of offering advice and dismissing studies acting as if how her dog reacted is the only truth.
Excuse me:confused: I could be wrong but I believe the op is asking for advice on what others here on the forum have done with their puppies.
 

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NOTICE TO OTHER POSTERS: Please do not reply to say that you kept your puppy in your master bedroom without problems. Studies report on tendencies that are more likely that not to happen. Good for you if you avoided those problems. But consider it luck and no more. Unfortunately you don't know if you will be lucky until it is too late.

I'd be interested in reading about these studies. New puppy is coming home shortly and I certainly don't want to screw him up by putting his crate in our bedroom.
 

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I agree all are different. I don't have goldens but I petsit for a few and relatives have them. I have herding dogs that I've gotten as puppies.

I admit I have failed night time crate training with a couple, couldn't stand the "screaming" LOL, so they ended up in bed with me , quiet as a churchmouse and never had an accident. I am NOT saying this is a good method but I've never ended up with any "behavioral problems" or other issues because of it.

With that, my last shepherd had to be crated at nite. I had a senior dog at the time and didn't want her bugging him at nite because everyone is usually in my room:)

I had the crate next to my bed, the other dogs were loose, and yes, she screeched the first few nites but would then fall asleep. Usually she would wake me around 2 am and I 'knew' she probably had to potty.

I think crating in your bedroom is a fine idea and the way to go or you may be up all night with a screaming puppy vs not as much screaming.

You won't really know till it happens and you just kinda have to deal with whatever is going on.

Good luck and congrats on your new puppy
 

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Congrats on your new furbaby! I think it is a great idea to crate your pup in the bedroom at night, it will help the pup feel safe, and not feel quite so lonely, it will usually sleep better (and so will you). I have to confess, that my pups and many foster pups spent their first night at my home, in my bed with me, it gave them a chance to settle in a little and get comfy with the new situation (not for everyone but I found it helped them get through the first night, it can be tough for them). After that they spent their nights in a crate beside my bed, the first week or so, any time they woke me up, I assumed they needed a potty break, so out we went, and straight back to bed. As my dogs got older and could be trusted at night, their crates were left open for them to use, or they could sleep on their dogbeds in the bedroom with no problems.
It takes a bit of guesswork the first few days, but you will figure it out in no time.
 

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I am going to have to cry uncle on this. I remember reading two studies on this that say what I said. But I cannot find them. I also know that the breeder/trainer I bought my puppy from felt this way. But there are several articles on the internet that suggest having a pup in the kennel in the bedroom at night is OK. I noticed that none dealt with the separation anxiety of the articles that i read. But in the absence of being able to provide you a link, I will just leave everyone to their own devices unless I can locate it.
 

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Tracer, Rumor & Cady
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Would you please cite these studies....
Ive crated in puppies in my bedroom at nighttime for a decade and not had a problem...would like to know what Im doing differently?

Crating next to the bed should be suspended once the puppy can hold it all night. Studies show in general continued crating of puppy in the master bedroom creates a whole array of other problems associated with separation anxiety.

NOTICE TO OTHER POSTERS: Please do not reply to say that you kept your puppy in your master bedroom without problems. Studies report on tendencies that are more likely that not to happen. Good for you if you avoided those problems. But consider it luck and no more. Unfortunately you don't know if you will be lucky until it is too late.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks guys for the advice..As putting the crate in my bedroom would be off limit for now, since I just want to make sure that he know his leader...I read this somewhere, can't remember...

Would it be a good idea if I exercise him before he go to sleep? Speaking of exercise, he would get his shot, eurican 4 I think..would it be okay to take him outside for exercise? I know it's not a complete vaccine yet...
 

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Crating next to the bed should be suspended once the puppy can hold it all night. Studies show in general continued crating of puppy in the master bedroom creates a whole array of other problems associated with separation anxiety.

NOTICE TO OTHER POSTERS: Please do not reply to say that you kept your puppy in your master bedroom without problems. Studies report on tendencies that are more likely that not to happen. Good for you if you avoided those problems. But consider it luck and no more. Unfortunately you don't know if you will be lucky until it is too late.
Soooo, where does the study recommend the crate be placed? Anywhere, just not in the bedroom? Can you give us the name of the study? I'd like to read it.
 

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Soooo, where does the study recommend the crate be placed? Anywhere, just not in the bedroom? Can you give us the name of the study? I'd like to read it.
As I said above I can not locate the study. It suggested that the dog be left in the family area where it could be heard. But others I found in looking for the original article I referenced said OK to the bedroom. As I said once before in responding to this issue, do what you want since I cannot locate the study.
 

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Crating next to the bed should be suspended once the puppy can hold it all night. Studies show in general continued crating of puppy in the master bedroom creates a whole array of other problems associated with separation anxiety.

NOTICE TO OTHER POSTERS: Please do not reply to say that you kept your puppy in your master bedroom without problems. Studies report on tendencies that are more likely that not to happen. Good for you if you avoided those problems. But consider it luck and no more. Unfortunately you don't know if you will be lucky until it is too late.
So you are the ultimate authority and no one else is allowed to share their experience or voice their opinion? Pardon me, but this is a board with thousands of members, many of whom who are immensely knowlegeable and have vast experience raising puppies and valuable experience to share with the rest of us. I'll take their advise over your nebulous "studies" every time.
 
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