Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone!

I have a 9 month dog that is stacking well, showing his bite, and for the most part holding still for examination. Our problem area is gaiting. It's difficult keeping him in a straight line for down and back right now. He pulls to the left at times. I figured out to hold the lead in front of his face, in front of me so the lead doesn't bother his ear making him shake his head. I'm also having a hard time finding that perfect pace where he's not going to slow or looking like he's paddling.

My boy is still growing but shows promise. He's been placed as Winner's Reserve Dog at his first show weekend one of the days at 6 months then Winners Reserve Dog to a 5 point major at 8 months.

Any tips would be most appreciated. Thank you in advance.
 

·
Kate
Joined
·
22,835 Posts
I'm also having a hard time finding that perfect pace where he's not going to slow or looking like he's paddling.
It's difficult keeping him in a straight line for down and back.
One of the best pieces of advice I received from my Bertie's breeder ages ago was find a target across the ring and aim for it. If you move in a straight line - it will keep your dog moving out in a straight line. And keep your dog on the mat.

When you turn around to go back to the judge - pause and look up and make eye contact with that judge first before you begin going back. That's your target for going back. Going away, it's the corner of the ring (or whatever is in front of you - most judges send you to a corner).

Having the lead in front of your dog's head - only caution is to me that sounds like your dog is lagging? And paddling could be his movement or it could be he is carrying his head too high or looking up at you. If that is the case, practice at home with him driving forward to a target across the room - and reward at that target. You should be able to give him his head and let him lead the way while he drives forward.

My take?

Congrats on the big reserves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
One of the best pieces of advice I received from my Bertie's breeder ages ago was find a target across the ring and aim for it. If you move in a straight line - it will keep your dog moving out in a straight line. And keep your dog on the mat.

When you turn around to go back to the judge - pause and look up and make eye contact with that judge first before you begin going back. That's your target for going back. Going away, it's the corner of the ring (or whatever is in front of you - most judges send you to a corner).

Having the lead in front of your dog's head - only caution is to me that sounds like your dog is lagging? And paddling could be his movement or it could be he is carrying his head too high or looking up at you. If that is the case, practice at home with him driving forward to a target across the room - and reward at that target. You should be able to give him his head and let him lead the way while he drives forward.

My take?

Congrats on the big reserves.
Thank you for the advice! Thinking on your advice, it could definitely be I'm holding his head too high and he's lagging. 🤔 It's a learning curve for us both right now. I appreciate it.
 

·
Esquire Golden Retrievers
Joined
·
4,934 Posts
Megora is exactly right. You are the secret. Don't look at your dog, look where you're going and run in a straight line. Start out slow and increase your pace the first few steps, hold the lead away from your body, and your dog will follow. The two keys are you sighting your destination and heading straight for it, and giving your dog a gentle, smooth acceleration to his best pace. If you do that, he can't help but go in a rock straight line.

Megora is also right about the turn. Slow, stop, eyes up, and start to move in a straight line again.

You really don't have to look at your dog. If you do it right, he'll do it right. :)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,530 Posts
I agree with the other two. I try not to look at my dog because then she will look at me and start lifting in the front. I stare straight at the corner on the down and at the judge on the way back. In fact, I pretty much look at the judge any time I can. Even if I do a crappy job handling, eye contact exudes confidence. As if to say “my dog is the best one in here and I dare you not to put her up”.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,530 Posts
You don’t have to keep your dog on a long lead either. I keep mine pretty short most the time. Short doesn’t necessarily mean tight.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top