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Hello. I am seeking advice from Golden Retriever owners on the following two questions.

1. I am scheduled to bring home a puppy soon, but was informed by the breeder that one of the puppies in the litter has Retinal Dysplasia; just a minor one and the vet apparently said that it won't progress. I read from Vetary.com that since retina won't develop fully until 12~16 weeks, accurate diagnosis can be made only after full maturation has occurred. Since I have the second pick, I don't have to purchase the affected puppy. But would I still be taking chances by purchasing a puppy from this litter?

2. I would look for another puppy, but I am torn, because this is the perfect time to get a puppy since my son will be home to care for it during the summer months when the puppy is young. Come September when he's back in school, there will be nobody to care for the puppy during the day. I know it's not ideal, but can I make use of a crate in a large play pen to make this work?

I appreciate all your responses in advance.
 

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Puddles
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I purchased a puppy that was diagnosed with retinal dysplasia-geographic at 15 months. Basically this means there is a blind spot in the eye. The geographic variety means it's a large blind spot. I was told it should not progress but it will not go away either. It also means this puppy should be spayed as it will pass it on to any offspring and the sire and dam should never be paired again.
Had I know prior to getting this pup I wouldn't have done it or any others in the litter.

My goal was to do competition obedience, because of this eye issue I received a puppy that couldn't see very good. She would just stare in my direction vs. following me like most puppies. As she grew the vision improved as she learned to look around the blind spot but it still affects her training.
If you toss a ball into the air she looses sight of it and has to spin around listening for it to hit the ground. Occasionally she will bump into things. When she was little she would throw herself at the sofa as she couldn't tell how tall it was. She is struggling with jumps as she can't judge the height.
As far as personality, she is wonderful... she is beautiful and snuggly. She is a great companion but we are still struggling with some things. Competition obedience may never happen but we keep trying :) I wish my breeder had been as informed as yours seems to be.

I adore this girl and even though it was offered, couldn't return her to the breeder but if I had known there was an issue there is no way I would have brought her home.
 

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Puddles
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I'm going to add that she has also developed cataracts in both eyes in addition to the retina dysplasia-geographic. Eye exams will be done yearly to monitor. Just so you know, I was shown "normal" eye reports prior to purchase for both sire & dam. Still trying to figure out why the breeder had the dam retested 4 months later... this one was posted to OFA and showed cataracts.
I've tried to figure out who else purchased pups from the litter but the breeder only registered one other pup... strange as there were 9 or 10 in the litter and she did the registrations. I paid a lot of money for this girl and certainly didn't expect the possibility of having a blind dog at an early age.
Get insurance :)
 
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