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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I’ve been on the hunt for the perfect breeder for about 2 and a half years now. At first I was just trying to get a dog just to get one because I wanted company. But, I’ve realized that was immature and selfish. You shouldn’t get a dog JUST because of company. And you shouldn’t just pick whatever dog is available (breed wise) and that’s what I was trying to do. I’ve realized that I wanted a golden for awhile now. Growing up I had 2 goldens. One was an whiteish yellow and the other was a dark gold. But, having my golden Maddie. I’ve saw how intelligent the breed was. She had ran outside one day and we couldn’t find her. So, we went back inside. A couple hours later we heard pawing on the door and she was right outside. No we didn’t live in a house, we lived in an apartment. So, it was insane to me how she was able to find and remember the exact door and building!! Their intelligence, love, and personality keeps me wanting to come back to get a golden now that I’m moved out and on my own. So, now I’m stuck trying to find the perfect breeder. Most breeders in Indiana either have a lot of dogs and then breed them every heat cycle (I don’t see this as a bad thing I just heard that it could be a bad thing and lead to diseases. But also please give me some advice about this sort as well.) or only breed once a year and only select those who are older or “more experienced”. Or they’ve said they didn’t pick me because I just moved and haven’t been here for a year either (I moved here in may). And that’s kind of frustrating. I don’t mind waiting a year or two to find the perfect dog. That’s not the case. I just wish more breeders would allow younger adults to buy one. I’m also aware of they might think that I’m not in a stable position to take care of the dog either which I could understand. But, I wouldn’t be looking for a dog if I wasn’t in a stable position.

I would love some advice from you guys. I just found out about this website today which is amazing!!! But, also if you guys know of some amazing breeders in the IN, KY, OH, MI, and IL area that would be amazing. Facebook really limits you and you can’t tell if some are legit or not.

also if you could give me some advice on how to pick the perfect puppy over a screen lol. Not a lot of breeders here allow us to come see (due to COVID).
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I wouldn't tell that tale to a breeder who might assume if your dog got out you would not immediately allhandsondeck be looking...
but yes- Goldens are brilliant. I can check into a hotel and by the next time the dog knows what door we are going to.

So- breeding every cycle, after 2 YO, not a great idea but breeding two cycles in a row is considered the safest way for the bitch. Her uterus is going to get hammered by progesterone whether pregnant or not, so pregnant is only deleterious if she get emaciated from the puppies.
 

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Mod here. I moved your post to a more applicable area of the forum. Hopefully, it will help you get more responses.

On a side note, and you should verify with breeders, but if you're having trouble demonstrating to a breeder that you're a responsible prospect for one of their puppies, I suggest becoming a volunteer puppy raiser with a service dog organization that uses Labs, Goldens, or Lab-Goldens crosses. Will returning the puppy at the end of the 12-18 month training period be an emotional experience? Absolutely. But, you will have helped a person with a disability. Additionally, you'll be able to demonstrate to a breeder that you had the commitment to care for, train, and love a Lab or Golden. I have to think that demonstration would leave breeders with a very positive impression of you.
 

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On a side note, and you should verify with breeders, but if you're having trouble demonstrating to a breeder that you're a responsible prospect for one of their puppies, I suggest becoming a volunteer puppy raiser with a service dog organization that uses Labs, Goldens, or Lab-Goldens crosses. Will returning the puppy at the end of the 12-18 month training period be an emotional experience? Absolutely. But, you will have helped a person with a disability. Additionally, you'll be able to demonstrate to a breeder that you had the commitment to care for, train, and love a Lab or Golden. I have to think that demonstration would leave breeders with a very positive impression of you.
So off topic question here, but are you saying that breeders screen pet homes more than service dog organizations screen foster/volunteer homes?

I'm just curious, because I've seen this a few times and I wonder a little bit why a service dog organization would be seen as a stepping stone for a new owner. I would think that being a responsible dog owner, and having raised dogs successfully would be seen as a stepping stone to being accepted as a volunteer for these service dog organizations.

@OP - I know people are having pups right now, but you have to reach out at the right time to get on their lists. I believe unfortunately you are a little late to get on lists for pups that will be going home in August and even September and October, but I could be wrong. There's also people who back out. You just need to go through the breeder referrals and talk to breeders who breed a little more regularly.

Reading between the lines in what you posted - things you have to discuss with a breeder =

1. Stability of home. House or apartment, etc. If apartment or rental home, a breeder would want to know if you are able to stay there for 10+ years or what will happen if you need to move. As well, exercise and containing your dog are subjects that would come up as well.

2. Stability of income. Being able to buy a pup isn't the biggest hurdle. It's buying dog food which is crazy expensive right now and getting more so. Speaking personally here, each time I buy dog food + chews for my dogs, it costs about $100. And that's every other week. Vet bills are the other thing which require a degree of consideration. There's been a lot of chat on FB regarding vets limiting appointments and raising prices. I think any pet owner wants to make sure that if something comes up, they can afford the bills.

I'll give you a quick example here - the last vet bill we had to deal with was about $1000 between xrays, blood work, and procedures. Even with a pup - one of my dogs needed a surgery when he was about 8 months old which cost about $2500.

You can get insurance just to cover yourself, but you still need to be able to pay bills upfront before sending them to insurance. And insurance might not cover everything.
 

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So off topic question here, but are you saying that breeders screen pet homes more than service dog organizations screen foster/volunteer homes?

I'm just curious, because I've seen this a few times and I wonder a little bit why a service dog organization would be seen as a stepping stone for a new owner. I would think that being a responsible dog owner, and having raised dogs successfully would be seen as a stepping stone to being accepted as a volunteer for these service dog organizations.

@OP - I know people are having pups right now, but you have to reach out at the right time to get on their lists. I believe unfortunately you are a little late to get on lists for pups that will be going home in August and even September and October, but I could be wrong. There's also people who back out. You just need to go through the breeder referrals and talk to breeders who breed a little more regularly.

Reading between the lines in what you posted - things you have to discuss with a breeder =

1. Stability of home. House or apartment, etc. If apartment or rental home, a breeder would want to know if you are able to stay there for 10+ years or what will happen if you need to move. As well, exercise and containing your dog are subjects that would come up as well.

2. Stability of income. Being able to buy a pup isn't the biggest hurdle. It's buying dog food which is crazy expensive right now and getting more so. Speaking personally here, each time I buy dog food + chews for my dogs, it costs about $100. And that's every other week. Vet bills are the other thing which require a degree of consideration. There's been a lot of chat on FB regarding vets limiting appointments and raising prices. I think any pet owner wants to make sure that if something comes up, they can afford the bills.

I'll give you a quick example here - the last vet bill we had to deal with was about $1000 between xrays, blood work, and procedures. Even with a pup - one of my dogs needed a surgery when he was about 8 months old which cost about $2500.

You can get insurance just to cover yourself, but you still need to be able to pay bills upfront before sending them to insurance. And insurance might not cover everything.
A service dog organization may not have the same requirements as a breeder. Doesn't mean they don't screen carefully. Just means they can look for and accept attributes some breeders might not. Service dog organizations often have college campus programs. These programs result in terrific and needed socialization for the puppies. Some breeders might not sell a puppy to a college student because the puppy would like be left home alone when the student was in class. The puppies in the college campus programs go to class with the puppy raiser so they're not left at home.

Some breeders also won't sell to an apartment dweller. Service dog prospects need to be raised in a variety of environments such as an apartment because the eventual match with the service dog may live in an apartment. So, a service dog organization is willing to accept apartment dwellers.

Additionally, look at what you wrote to the OP about needing to be in one place for 10+ years. That's completely unnecessary for a volunteer puppy raiser who would only have the puppy for 12-18 months. So, breeders don't screen more but they screen differently based on completely different objectives.

We often see so many posts on here from people frustrated with their puppies - who are doing normal puppy things. Often, they failed to understand that retriever puppies are land sharks and that the well behaved three year old Golden they saw in the park was once a five month old land shark but good, solid training led to the well behaved three year old that they so admired and caused them to want a Golden. Additionally, service dog organizations often have puppy training classes that are only open to their puppies so a volunteer is attending training classes and has access to other training materials. A former volunteer puppy raiser can assure a private breeder that they know what they're getting into and that they have experience with training a puppy. Based on the posts I've read on this forum, if I were a private breeder I would absolutely want some assurance that somebody purchasing one of my puppies had realistic expectations of what a puppy is like and was committed to training that puppy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I wouldn't tell that tale to a breeder who might assume if your dog got out you would not immediately allhandsondeck be looking...
but yes- Goldens are brilliant. I can check into a hotel and by the next time the dog knows what door we are going to.

So- breeding every cycle, after 2 YO, not a great idea but breeding two cycles in a row is considered the safest way for the bitch. Her uterus is going to get hammered by progesterone whether pregnant or not, so pregnant is only deleterious if she get emaciated from the puppies.
Yes yes we definitely looked and ran after her we just ended up losing her cause she was too fast. Sorry to not put that in there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So off topic question here, but are you saying that breeders screen pet homes more than service dog organizations screen foster/volunteer homes?

I'm just curious, because I've seen this a few times and I wonder a little bit why a service dog organization would be seen as a stepping stone for a new owner. I would think that being a responsible dog owner, and having raised dogs successfully would be seen as a stepping stone to being accepted as a volunteer for these service dog organizations.

@OP - I know people are having pups right now, but you have to reach out at the right time to get on their lists. I believe unfortunately you are a little late to get on lists for pups that will be going home in August and even September and October, but I could be wrong. There's also people who back out. You just need to go through the breeder referrals and talk to breeders who breed a little more regularly.

Reading between the lines in what you posted - things you have to discuss with a breeder =

1. Stability of home. House or apartment, etc. If apartment or rental home, a breeder would want to know if you are able to stay there for 10+ years or what will happen if you need to move. As well, exercise and containing your dog are subjects that would come up as well.

2. Stability of income. Being able to buy a pup isn't the biggest hurdle. It's buying dog food which is crazy expensive right now and getting more so. Speaking personally here, each time I buy dog food + chews for my dogs, it costs about $100. And that's every other week. Vet bills are the other thing which require a degree of consideration. There's been a lot of chat on FB regarding vets limiting appointments and raising prices. I think any pet owner wants to make sure that if something comes up, they can afford the bills.

I'll give you a quick example here - the last vet bill we had to deal with was about $1000 between xrays, blood work, and procedures. Even with a pup - one of my dogs needed a surgery when he was about 8 months old which cost about $2500.

You can get insurance just to cover yourself, but you still need to be able to pay bills upfront before sending them to insurance. And insurance might not cover everything.
Yes pet visits for appointments are a little up there. I have a 4 month old kitten and a visit to my vet is a mandatory 100$ fee for each visit. I still personally don’t think I’m fully ready for a dog. Which is why I don’t mind to wait a year or two to see where I am. But, In the mean time I’ve been trying to find the best breeder. Maybe it’s best to wait until after I’m finished with school as well? And save up some more on the dog for it’s vet bills and all.

Also, not sure if this is an issue. But, is it rude to ask for AKC papers? I asked someone once and they got upset and went off on me and said that their husband said it wasn’t allowed and that it had personal information on it. But, all I wanted was proof of AKC breed.
 

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Yes pet visits for appointments are a little up there. I have a 4 month old kitten and a visit to my vet is a mandatory 100$ fee for each visit. I still personally don’t think I’m fully ready for a dog. Which is why I don’t mind to wait a year or two to see where I am. But, In the mean time I’ve been trying to find the best breeder. Maybe it’s best to wait until after I’m finished with school as well? And save up some more on the dog for it’s vet bills and all.

Also, not sure if this is an issue. But, is it rude to ask for AKC papers? I asked someone once and they got upset and went off on me and said that their husband said it wasn’t allowed and that it had personal information on it. But, all I wanted was proof of AKC breed.
Just ask for registered names of sire and dam. You don't need to physically see papers if you have the names- its easy enough to discern clearances, etc from the name alone
 

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Someone not Being willing to show you proof of AKC registration is a huge red flag. All that info is available in public data bases and any reputable breeder will happily share whatever info you need to verify not only that the dog is AKC registered but that it has all the appropriate clearances proscribed by the GRCA Code of Ethics. If someone pushes back on any of that, assume they are NOT reputable and move on…. (and FYI, AKC registration is something even pet store/puppy mill dogs can get and is no indication of health or quality. If you want a healthy pup from a reputable breeder, read the Code and only give your business to breeders who follow it… ALL of it).
 
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