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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Feeding cotton in emergency.

I have seen a few threads here about peoples dogs eating different things so I thought I would bring this up. We had one of our Golden's (Sydney) break into the living room at Christmas a couple of years ago (we were home but she had disappeared for a second). We found some broken ornaments and were not sure if she got a small amount down. We made some phone calls and were told to feed her cotton. I looked it up on the web to make sure about how to do this.
Something like this site talks about. We broke the cotton balls up in peaces and dipped them in milk and she ate them like they were treats. We still made a trip to the vets in the morning.
I have heard even if you are gong to the vet doing this can minimize the damage if it is done as soon as you find out they have eating something that could have sharp edges.

Just wounder if others here have done this.

Got to go we are taking the girls out to the park. I will check back later.
 

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I've heard of feeding bread in situations like that, but cotton baffles me. I'd be afraid that that alone would cause a blockage.
 

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I have heard of giving them bread but not cotton.
 

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I've seen both bread and cotton balls mentioned-luckily I have never had to use either! I would assume you want the real cotton balls, not the other kind.
 

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The idea is that the pieces of glass will get caught in the cotton balls and pass through the digestive tract without doing any harm. You should use real cotton balls, nothing man made.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've seen both bread and cotton balls mentioned-luckily I have never had to use either! I would assume you want the real cotton balls, not the other kind.
Yep you can only use 100% real cotton and you only give a certain amount. I have heard real good stories about using it. Even one about a pup that ate cardboard with the big staples and a vet giving cotton that wrapped around the staples and the dog passed them without damage.
 

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Yep you can only use 100% real cotton and you only give a certain amount. I have heard real good stories about using it. Even one about a pup that ate cardboard with the big staples and a vet giving cotton that wrapped around the staples and the dog passed them without damage.
Good to know. The story I heard was a dog who did exactly what your dog did-got into Christmas ornaments :(
 

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Yes, my Vet has used and recommended cotton balls. He had an owner who was a seamstress bring her dog in. The dog had eaten about 14 pins. When the Vet x-rayed the dog the pins were in various places and he felt it was not a good idea to go in and operate in so many locations. He gave the dog cotton balls soaked in a little milk. When the dog relieved itself, they found all 14 pins in the cotton balls! I've heard you can use this technique if your dog has eaten glass, too.
 

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Yep, a few times with Jax, the chew it up n eat it king, lol :doh:

I MAy not always know where my car keys are, but cotton balls, hell yeah, lol :D

I have seen a few threads here about peoples dogs eating different things so I thought I would bring this up. We had one of our Golden's (Sydney) break into the living room at Christmas a couple of years ago (we were home but she had disappeared for a second). We found some broken ornaments and were not sure if she got a small amount down. We made some phone calls and were told to feed her cotton. I looked it up on the web to make sure about how to do this.
Something like this site talks about. We broke the cotton balls up in peaces and dipped them in milk and she ate them like they were treats. We still made a trip to the vets in the morning.
I have heard even if you are gong to the vet doing this can minimize the damage if it is done as soon as you find out they have eating something that could have sharp edges.

Just wounder if others here have done this.

Got to go we are taking the girls out to the park. I will check back later.
 

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We advice our puppy families to keep natural cotton wool in the pups first aid box. It will pick up anything sharp that they swallow glass, pins, staples. Thankfully I havent heard that this has ever been required.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I forgot to post a link to direction for this method so I thought I would add it. I'm sure there are other but here is what seams to be what all of them say. This is the same directions I followed but from a different source which I can not find now.

What You Need:
Use cotton balls that are made of 100% cotton. Do not use "cosmetic puffs" as these are made from man-made fibers and do not work like the 100% cotton ones.
Next, get a quart of Half & Half coffee creamer or if you prefer, use Liverwurst (a type of meat sausage which spreads easily on bread) or something you know your dog loves and will not reject.
What to Do:
Tear the cotton balls into small pieces and soak them in the Half & Half or generously smear Liverwurst on the cotton balls. The idea is to get something you know your dog will eagerly eat, onto that cotton ball as quickly as possible. This will begin the process of bringing the foreign object out of your dogs system SAFELY.
Feed the cotton balls to your dog one at a time.
DO NOT force your dog to eat the cotton balls if they are unwilling!Dogs know when they are able to eat and not wanting to means they are unable. This reaction might suggest they have a blockage and will need immediate medical attention!
Give according to weight:
5 - 10 lbs feed 2 cotton balls.
10 - 50 lbs feed 3-5 cotton balls.
50+ lbs feed 5-7 cotton balls.
Dogs seem to really like these strange "treats" and readily eat them. As the cotton works its way through the digestive tract, it will attract all the glass or bone pieces or any other sharp objects your dog may have swallowed, wrapping itself around them.
Even the smallest bits of the object swallowed will be caught and wrapped in the cotton fibers. The cotton acts as a protective barrier for the intestinal wall, allowing for the object to be eliminated safely with the dog's next bowel movement.
Expected Results:
Your dog's stools will look strange for a few days but should you see fresh blood or a tarry appearance to the stool, rush your dog to the vet for a checkup but in most cases, the dogs will be just fine. The cotton always comes out with the object safely embedded.
http://www.k911.biz/Petsafety/DogAteChickenBone.htm
 

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We had this question last week after Riley ate 2 thumbtacks. We fed her bread and olive oil instead of cotton balls and took her to the vet. I think the bread DID help the tacks pass (and thankfully she was completely fine after 24 hours) BUT it prevented the vet from removing the pins immediately from the stomach via oral scope, so you may want to call/visit the vet before feeding your dog anything
 

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Good to know!

My mom called me one day, she had made fish for dinner and the young boy she babysat, started choking on, presumably, a bone so I told her to feed him bread. It seemed to have caught the bone and he was fine. I probably would use bread if any of my dogs had swallowed anything sharp but 100% cotton balls is good to know.
 
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