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Our breeder told us she works a lot of different kinds of raw and cooked food into her dogs’ diets on top of their dry kibble. She said the omega 3 and 6 are really good for their coats and skin. I can’t remember the other benefits she said from them but there were several. Her recommendations:
Canned salmon or mackerel Raw meat and bones: organic chicken, pork, beef, turkey, fish, deer, rabbit, etc. (her words exactly) Organic raw eggs
Does anyone else do this? Curious for what your regimen is if so, she said every meal she works some in which seems like it’ll get expensive. Also I remember growing up my dad said never to give chicken bones to dogs because they’re a choking hazard. Any advice helps thanks!
 

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Your dad was CORRECT! Stay away from chicken bones and NO COOKED BONES either (they will splinter). Not only are they a choking hazard, but the splinters can get lodged in the intestines and puncture them! I have heard that chicken necks are good, but have always been afraid to try them. I feed a raw marrow bone (supervised) to my 3 dogs weekly and it helps clean their teeth. My recently departed 14.5 yr old Border Collie never needed a dental and neither have my 3 other younger dogs.

I began "spiking" my dog's food with raw chicken organs, sardines in WATER (only) and raw Turkey roll. I stay away from larger fish like Salmon and Mackerel due to heavy metal concerns, which do not seem as bad in the smaller fish like sardines. I give it to them 2x per week mixed with their kibble. (I alternate the sources) My vet approves so I continue and YES..it will get expensive, but imo..well worth it. I suggest asking your own vet and see what he/she says.
 

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Actually, chicken bones -uncooked- are included in most raw diets. They don't splinter any more than any other bones as long as they are raw. If you want to toss something little in, buy a package of chicken necks. They are high in glucosamine. You can buy a can of mackerel or salmon though those are technically not 'raw' and add a couple spoonfuls to each meal. Dogs can eat eggshells if you want to give one. Talk to someone who's actually fed raw successfully for your advice- such as your breeder.
 

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And basically, if you are going to start incorporating raw nutritional bones (as opposed to marrow or femur bones which are just recreational) you need to educate yourself on the parts of any animal you use as to the dangers involved. Ex: turkey necks- they are soft bones, and completely edible. However, they are also of a size/shape that can easily choke your dog...so don't give to dogs who swallow rather than chew. Rabbits- the fur is going to go right through- so your yard is going to have white fluffy poops.. and on poops... going to a high bone diet is going to make the poops much harder and possibly constipate your dog. There are safe bones in every prey model animal- study up to know what they are. Even chickens, which are usually pretty digestible in raw form- I wouldn't give a dog a leg quarter because if any of their bones would be splintery it would be in the leg quarter.
 

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There are lots of ways to "tiptoe" into feeding your dog more "real" food. The easiest things to start with would be the canned mackerel/salmon, and the occasional raw egg (my personal feeling is local eggs from small backyard, "free range" flocks will be both healthier and less likely to have salmonella). You can also buy commercial raw products (frozen, freeze dried, powders, etc) that you can give them now and then, either as a topper or as a meal - then there is no fear of the bones being an issue at all, and many are already "balanced" so you're not likely to do much to throw them off nutritionally. You can also do lightly cooked lean meats, and cooked or pureed veggies (just do a little research to make sure you're not feeding one of the few veggies that aren't good for dogs - like onions).
 

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Lol raw bones, even chicken bones are fine to feed dogs. Raw, uncooked bones are more chalky and don't splinter. Cooked bones are dry out and made brittle during the cooking process.

As a puppy though, I would not feed the bones until at least 4 months old. Basically when they are old enough to understand to chew and not just be a knuckleheads trying to eat them whole.

Raw food is also significantly easier for young puppies to digest then the carbs and starches in a high grain kibble, but I still wait till about 3 months to start feeding raw unless the puppy was already started on it.
 

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As I said..NO chicken bones for my dogs!:
From Petmd.com


"Is It Bad for Dogs to Eat Chicken Bones?

Dogs have been eating bones for thousands of years, and most of the time, they process them just fine.

Typically, chicken bones will dissolve once they hit the stomach—before they have a chance to become dangerous. Most times, dogs are able to pass chicken bones uneventfully. Other bones, such as beef and pork bones, can cause significantly more distress and disease.

However, there are some potential hazards for dogs that are tempted to eat chicken bones.

Potential Obstruction

Cooked bones tend to be slightly softer than raw bones, but some (such as the thigh bone) can be quite large relative to the size of the dog.

If a dog swallows—or tries to swallow—a chicken bone, and it does not go all the way down, it can become lodged in the esophagus. This can cause a lot of gagging, drooling and retching.

In other dogs, the bone can become stuck in the upper part of the airway—either the back of the throat (the pharynx) or the start of the airway itself. This is an immediate emergency in which the dog will show significant signs of distress and might cough heavily or have trouble breathing.

Risk of Tearing the GI Tract

Chicken bones splinter easily, and when they are swallowed, they can cause perforation of the esophagus or the intestinal tract.

Contamination From Bacteria

Particularly if the chicken is uncooked, your dog is at risk of exposure to bacteria like salmonella.

What to Do If Your Dog Chokes on a Chicken Bone

If you are concerned that the bone is stuck in the upper airway or the upper intestinal tract, this is an emergency and should be addressed immediately.

If you are able to see or grasp the bone to get it out, you should do so as long as you are able to without distressing your dog further or getting hurt or bitten.

However, if it is not immediately visible, take your pet to the vet as quickly as possible.

If you suspect that your dog has eaten a chicken bone and they display any of the following symptoms, take them to your veterinarian immediately:

  • Poor appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Lethargy
  • Gagging or retching
  • Drooling
  • Coughing
  • Having trouble breathing
If your dog is active, is eating well and seems completely normal, it’s generally safe to simply monitor the situation.

As a rule, avoid feeding your dog bones altogether. If your dog does get ahold of a chicken bone and he appears distressed, act quickly and call an emergency vet.

If your dog seems to be acting completely normal, it will all probably come out fine in the end (pun fully intended!).

By: Dr. Sandra Mitchell, DVM"

Featured Image: iStock.com/fotyma
 

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As I said- avoid leg quarters (the thigh bone mentioned in the (thankfully cited) petmd article. Otherwise, do your studying and you'll find chicken bones are for the most part not problematic. One COULD write an article about kibble killing dogs who choke on it. I know of 3 or 5 myself who've died from inhaling kibble.
 

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Some information for the OP concerning the Value of raw marrow bones: Lots more info to be found on google..Both Pro and Con.

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5 Reasons To Give Your Dog Beef Marrow Bones
September 27, 2016 By My GBGV Life 50 Comments


Sharing is caring!


My GBGV Life 5 Reasons To Give Your Dog Beef Marrow Bones
What are beef marrow bones, and why would anyone give them to their dog? We are huge fans of these bones at my house, and I thought I would share five reasons why your dog should be munching on them too! Since dogs are not allowed in the store where Mom buys these delicacies, I had her snap a photo for my post. Don’t tell me you are not drooling looking at them!
My GBGV Life 5 Reasons To Give Your Dog Beef Marrow Bones
Reason 1 – beef marrow bones are all natural


There is nothing fake about these bones. We purchase ours right from the butcher in the cooler case. They come in all different sizes, and they even have regular or smoked. They need to be kept cool or frozen so they don’t go bad because there are no preservatives. Mom buys a bunch of them and keeps them in the bags in the freezer for evening snacks once or twice a week.
My GBGV Life 5 Reasons To Give Your Dog Beef Marrow Bones
Reason 2 – beef marrow bones are delicious


Unless your dog is just plain nuts, they will love the taste of these bones. I’m super picky, but I sure love them. Bones are something dogs eat in nature and simply love. Bailie and I work hard on them and gnaw on them until they are completely clean – inside and out.
My GBGV Life 5 Reasons To Give Your Dog Beef Marrow Bones
Reason 3 – beef marrow bones are great for dental health


Dogs can clean their teeth naturally by chewing bones. Yes, there is always the danger of breaking a tooth. Yes, dogs should be monitored when chewing bones to prevent any choking or ingesting of the actual bone. If you think about it, dogs can break their teeth playing ball, or doing many things. Unless your dog is a super aggressive chewer, beef marrow bones are an excellent way to help keep those chompers shiny clean. The bones come in lots of sizes, so you can get the best size for your dog. Remember, I’m ten and have the teeth of a four year old, partially from chewing bones!
My GBGV Life 5 Reasons To Give Your Dog Beef Marrow Bone
Reason 4 – beef marrow bones are good for overall health


Bone marrow has many health benefits for your dog besides their teeth. The adiponectin has been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease and certain cancers. Marrow also supports kidney and digestive function, it can aid in repairing wounds, and will help generate new red and white blood cells. All that healthy stuff in such a tasty bone – what a great thing!
869795
 

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my chihuahua & golden are raw fed- both have been raw fed for a couple of years now with no issues to their blood work etc. ( i get yearly tests done as a benchmark for their health).

i recently got a new golden pup, he is currently 4 months now. he was fed kibble at the breeder's topped it with raw mince beef & yogurt for each meal. I continued doing that when he arrived, but prepared my own raw mix to top on his kibble ( as i want to balance the extra meat he's getting with calcium etc), so i add ground chicken bones in for him ( like others have said, raw chicken bones are a staple for raw diets). i was planning to switch him fully to raw, it's a bit tricky at this stage for me as he grows SO FAST, and his weight changes weekly so my vet advised me to stick to the puppy kibble and switch when he is about 10 months.

the current raw meat toppers i give him are actually fully balanced raw meals ( as i don't want to give too much unbalanced pure muscle meat, as they need the calcium + phosphorous ratio to be balanced).

this is made up of: minced beef (i mince my own), chicken hearts, chicken bones, beef spleen, lamb liver, lamb brains, pork kidneys etc etc! all the meats your breeder mentioned are good suggestions & they i do think its very beneficial to feed them fresh food!

PS, if you are feeding the raw meat, and you buy the meat fresh, be sure to freeze the meat for at least a week before feeding ( 3 weeks for pork) to kill all parasites etc.
 

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Some information for the OP concerning the Value of raw marrow bones: Lots more info to be found on google..Both Pro and Con.

Track My Blog via Email
Email Address
5 Reasons To Give Your Dog Beef Marrow Bones
September 27, 2016 By My GBGV Life 50 Comments


Sharing is caring!


My GBGV Life 5 Reasons To Give Your Dog Beef Marrow Bones
What are beef marrow bones, and why would anyone give them to their dog? We are huge fans of these bones at my house, and I thought I would share five reasons why your dog should be munching on them too! Since dogs are not allowed in the store where Mom buys these delicacies, I had her snap a photo for my post. Don’t tell me you are not drooling looking at them!
My GBGV Life 5 Reasons To Give Your Dog Beef Marrow Bones
Reason 1 – beef marrow bones are all natural


There is nothing fake about these bones. We purchase ours right from the butcher in the cooler case. They come in all different sizes, and they even have regular or smoked. They need to be kept cool or frozen so they don’t go bad because there are no preservatives. Mom buys a bunch of them and keeps them in the bags in the freezer for evening snacks once or twice a week.
My GBGV Life 5 Reasons To Give Your Dog Beef Marrow Bones
Reason 2 – beef marrow bones are delicious


Unless your dog is just plain nuts, they will love the taste of these bones. I’m super picky, but I sure love them. Bones are something dogs eat in nature and simply love. Bailie and I work hard on them and gnaw on them until they are completely clean – inside and out.
My GBGV Life 5 Reasons To Give Your Dog Beef Marrow Bones
Reason 3 – beef marrow bones are great for dental health


Dogs can clean their teeth naturally by chewing bones. Yes, there is always the danger of breaking a tooth. Yes, dogs should be monitored when chewing bones to prevent any choking or ingesting of the actual bone. If you think about it, dogs can break their teeth playing ball, or doing many things. Unless your dog is a super aggressive chewer, beef marrow bones are an excellent way to help keep those chompers shiny clean. The bones come in lots of sizes, so you can get the best size for your dog. Remember, I’m ten and have the teeth of a four year old, partially from chewing bones!
My GBGV Life 5 Reasons To Give Your Dog Beef Marrow Bone
Reason 4 – beef marrow bones are good for overall health


Bone marrow has many health benefits for your dog besides their teeth. The adiponectin has been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease and certain cancers. Marrow also supports kidney and digestive function, it can aid in repairing wounds, and will help generate new red and white blood cells. All that healthy stuff in such a tasty bone – what a great thing!

View attachment 869795
For someone that posted your are "no authority on diet" you sure are working hard to convince people (or yourself) you are.
 
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