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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dodger had his first exposure to the teeter last weekend, which did not go so well. He walked up it once to the middle and got praise and treats while the instuctor slowly lowered it a few inches onto a table (with a mat under so it didnt make any noise). After that he would only put his front paws up. Last night I went to a drop-in agility class to practice, and again he would only put his front paws on. Whats worse, is that I discovered he now wont go on the dog walk (which he has been happily running over for months). He still loves the A frame though. We tried putting the teeter flat with a chair on one end and the pause table on the other, but he wouldnt jump up onto the pause table to get on it. So we took the teeter away and just worked on getting him onto the pause table, but he wont do that either. Today I walking by the playground and noticed that to get on the equipment that are little platforms of various heights. So I took him over to get him to walk over the one on the ground (with the idea that we could work up to the slightly higher level) but he wont go near it. He backs away and puts his front paws up in the air.

Anyone have any experience with helping their dog to overcome these kinds of fears?
 

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Brady Aedan Finch and Wren
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Goldens and teeter issues often go together. There are many issues with the teeter including

1) The bang
2) The movement
3) The narrowness
4) The Height
etc

I am training my youngsters each area separately and they are demanding their teeter time :)

Bang: Click and treat while you make it bang (I use a foot)
Then shape them banging for a treat (front paws)
Then shape then banging with the board tipping to table
etc.
It is a blast once the dog figures out he makes it bang, he gets a treat - this also teaches the dog that he is in control of the noise, it is not just random. This seems to help.

Height: Place dog at top of teeter with the teeter end securely supported (I use a metal chair). Liverwurst is really good here for a treat at the end of th eboard. Then slowly start placing the dog further and further back and have them run to the end of the board for their treat.

Movement: Use a tippy board or a low teeter and slowly increase the height. Being brave and rocking are heavily rewarded :)

Narrowness: Plank on the ground or low teeer that is shaped: They get comfortable crossing, traversing, turning around on etc. At first it may need to be simplified to a glance, a step towards, a sniff, a touch, a foot on etc.

Then there is the final position and getting on and off but these are separate in my mind to the becoming comfortable on the teeter itself.

I hope this helps :)
 

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Riley had issues with the teeter too. I got some really yummy treats that he only got when working on the teeter. I taught him to put his feet up and bang the teeter down. The whole time I was stuffing his face with treats. He caught on very quickly. Now he loves to bang down the teeter. So after a couple of weeks of just banging the teeter down I had him go up it and he was fine. He isn't 100% confident on it but he will do the teeter now by himself and I still give him those yummy treats.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the advice!! I never would have thought of training him to bang the end down. I just went out and bought a plank of wood and we went back to the basics. At first he would only put his front paws on it, but it only took a few minutes to convince him that walking across it is the greatest thing ever!
 

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Magica Goldens
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I start all the puppies on the bang game. Just make it make noise and get a cookie - we start this as young as 8 weeks depending on the puppy. If its noise sensitivity it might help to click and treat while another dog runs the teeter - at least to start.

Then before you walk across the board think about just rewarding movement....stand on the board and reward (in place) for moving the board - help him understand that he controls the movement.

As for the DW/teeter confusion - it's common - happens with almost every dog and with consistency and experience the DW fear should take care of itself. For now put the DW down and pay lots for it.

Erica
 
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