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Murphy's Human, Kam
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I've read stories about people with service dogs who are challenged because of the amount of 'fake' service dogs out there. A part of me thought it was a bit of urban myth or not that easy until last night.

I'm out at the neighbourhood park with the boys when one of the guys starts bragging about how he got his dog certified as a service dog. He did this so he could take his dog places with him. Pulled out the ID card to provide. (I didn't pay attention to the state). I thought he meant therapy dog but NO his card said certified service dog. His daughter lives in the US and is allowed a service dog. So she registered her parents dog as her service dog.

They did not have to pass a test. Did not have to state what kind of service dog he is. They live in BC with their dog who goes to his office with him, business owner of some sort. Daughter lives in the US so I'm not really certain how he assists her with her disability.

I look at how much time I've spent over the last year training a service dog. He still has another several months to go before he enters the next phase of training for another 4-6mths and then he could still fail due to something such as toileting, dog distraction or not liking escalators. Not to mention the steps I'm going through to get the other trained as a therapy dog.

Apparently I could have saved the time, effort and money and just gotten myself a card saying they are certified service dogs.:doh:

Am I just being petty to be upset by this????:confused:
 
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No, you're not petty at all. It is upsetting when people abuse something so valuable. It is sad that people are so selfish and thoughtless. They're affecting all the people who really need service animals to help them.

Thank you for all you're effort training dogs to provide people with incredible companions.
 

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On another note, my dog NEVER goes on escalators. Dogs lose toenails that way. We take the elevator.
 

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Sir Louis Crosby
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Here in Tennessee, the legislature recently removed the requirement for service dog owners to carry documentation.

That certainly makes things easier on owners of legitimate service dogs, but it also makes it that much easier to cheat the system.

I don't know how other states handle it.
 

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OP is posting from outside the US.

Establishments cannot ask for documentation or certification, they can only ask two questions:
1. Is the animal for a disability
2. What work does it do
Revised ADA Requirements: Service Animals

This is a federal law and that TN law would have been invalid if it existed.
 

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Sir Louis Crosby
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Sir Louis Crosby
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This article is a little more in depth: Service dogs still hounded despite change in Tennessee law | The Tennessean | tennessean.com

I'm not sure how the law co-existed with the ADA regulations this long, but this is the explanation the article offers:

For years, the wording of Tennessee law planted the idea that people with disabilities could be questioned by business owners, said Lafferty, the disability rights advocate. A Tennessee attorney general’s opinion in 2001 added to that thinking by supporting the state law despite its difference from the federal disabilities act.

Understanding of the disabilities act has now evolved, Lafferty said. Last year’s change, which firmly established in law that such questions were inappropriate, sailed through the legislature. The new law also gives business owners the ability to ask that service animals be removed when out of control.
 

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Mercy Miracle (M&M)
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No you're not. It is an outrage that people are getting fake service dog certifications. This also sometimes causes the people with real service dogs to be denied access to places. I call it being penalized for past offenses. For example, thanks to Spetember 11th, we all get screened with much higher scrutiny. There are outdoor places that do not allow dogs because other people did not pick up after them. You've worked hard for your certification. I can see why you're angry.
 

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States can make laws until they are blue in the face, but federal law surpasses state law, so no state can ever make documentation required in the US
 
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I have personally witnessed two fake service dogs.

When I was waitressing, a customer came in with his elderly mixed breed dog, no leash, very arthritic, could barely walk. No vest. The restaurant owner told me the dog was allowed because he was a service dog, the guy was a friend of the owner, and I had always thought the owner was lying to me, there was just something in the the tone, and the dog did not look healthy enough to be a service dog.

Second time was on a plane, another elderly Great Dane was being passed as an eye seeing dog. I heard the owner's son telling the ticket agent. The dog was barely trained to walk correctly on the leash! Again, could not walk very well because of his age. No vest, no harness/halter for the blind ( whatever that is called ). The dog was in the stewardess's way the whole flight, because he kept going into the aisle. I heard the stewardesses talking that they knew he was fake but they could not do anything about it. Sad part was, this flight was going through the remnants of a tropical storm, and a very scary, dangerous flight, bad turbulence. That dogs was in the way of them helping the passengers out that needed them.

It is too bad that it has come to this, and it really hurts the people that need them.
 

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Last winter we had a guy go to Walmar* with a "service" dog. The ADA has the law written so that a service dog does not have to be on a leash. Anyway this guy goes into Walmar* with a pup he picked up at the pound the day before. He gets a motorized sit in cart and proceeds down the aisles. He is missing his legs due to diabetes, so he does need the cart. He wheels around Walmar* with this loose pup. An assistant manager kindly asks him to leash his dog. The dog owner's reply is to take out a shotgun and shoot the manager in the gut, then wheel out the store with the pup. An off duty police officer grabs the guy and gets the gun away from him. In Alaska concealed weapons are totally legal without any special licensing or other requirements. So the guy in the wheelchair was legal to carry and hide a shotgun in his coat. The guy in the wheelchair then gets all upset saying that the Walmar* manager was telling him to leave the building and he couldn't have his dog in Walmar* and they were abusing him. He actually tried to say that he was being discriminated against by Walmar*. Needless to say it's all on tape and nothing of the kind was said about him having to leave and the manager was completely polite. But the guy in the wheelchair continued to try to justify shooting the manager. Meanwhile the manager almost bleed to death and had massive medical issues related to having a gut shot, which is the worst place to get shot.

So the case finally when to court. The shooter got a 9 years in jail. That was it. Case closed. I was very dismayed to see some of the service dog groups back up this guy in the wheelchair for defending his rights. The manager that got shot in the gut, well his life is changed forever just because a wacko used the service dog law to be a jerk.

Here's the original article: Man in motorized cart shoots Walmart employee in dispute over dog, police say | Crime | ADN.com

Next article: With Walmart shooting victim in critical condition, new details emerge about man charged in attack | Anchorage | ADN.com

Then sentencing: Wal-Mart gunman gets nine-year sentence in shooting over loose dog | Crime | ADN.com
 

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I have seen it a number of times. Once a dog was at a party, roaming loose, nowhere near the person. Service dog. Maybe, but he couldn't have been working that well in a separate room from her. This one I believe was a true service dog, but I believe, that the owner should not have let him roam. His nose was on the table with the food, though she swore he would never take it. Maddie at a nine months (not service trained) would never put her nose on a table with food.

The other was an old little dog who came in a restaurant as a service dog. Didn't look to me like he could do much of anything.

Personally, I think the laws need to be revisited.
 
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Depending on the handler's disability, the dog may not have to physically do very much to assist the handler. My dog is trained to smell the chemical changes in my body when my blood sugar is dropping. He lets me know it's happening by touching his nose to my right hand
 

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Bernie and Oliver's Mom
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Depending on the handler's disability, the dog may not have to physically do very much to assist the handler. My dog is trained to smell the chemical changes in my body when my blood sugar is dropping. He lets me know it's happening by touching his nose to my right hand
Louisiana, did you train this yourself or work with an organization? I know youre a well respected trainer on the forum so I wasn't sure :)

Sent from Petguide.com Free App
 

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Trained him myself. But I haven't been keeping up with regular service dog training lately, so I haven't been using him in that capacity this year.
 

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Murphy's Human, Kam
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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks so much for the feedback and information I was not aware of.

HeartofGold - love the bunny photo.
Loisiana - I totally understand those trained service dogs. I still think they need to be in the same country as you though to detect those changes in your body ;-)

Shows how naive I am or we're more legislated here in Canada. Service dogs have to be on leash and usually wear a tag with org name and phone number. Granted most people get their dogs from one of the non-profits and they do have to pass tests and the organization certifies the dog for the blind, autism, diabetes, deaf, etc.

I have to admit I don't fully understand how comfortable blind people may be with escalators. Eg if in downtown Toronto and travelling lots an escalator makes sense. However many cities don't have buildings with escalators so why would it matter if the dog was placed in that city. However, I don't make the rules, I just have to follow them so the boy has to be comfortable on them. Only two dogs in a 20+ year history working with dogs have been hurt using escalators so I defer to my handlers. The other dog walks on & off escalators with no issues so dog personality has to factor into it. Ah well, we'll keep plugging away.
 

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My post was actually in response to the post above mine, saying they saw an old little dog that didn't look like he could do much.
 
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My post was actually in response to the post above mine, saying they saw an old little dog that didn't look like he could do much.
Sorry, that was me.
 
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