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Here is an excellent article written by Rhonda Hovan, respected breeder/judge and very active in the arena of Golden Retriever health:

http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q...TFJ6_-&sig=AHIEtbQBcUQrq3PRT7V6We99o9LV_brz0g

I will probably never neuter another one of my personal dogs again. However, since I breed, I am set up to be able to handle intact dogs and bitches.

My friends and I are also discussing leaving an ovary (or ovaries) intact, if and when, we spay our bitches. There is some evidence that female hormones offer some protection in terms of longevity. This is a new study, but taken in conjunction with other articles, makes some sense:

http://www.gpmcf.org/respectovaries.html
 

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I do not think that vet offices are "out to get your money."

A lot of vets recommend spay/neuter early because it can prevent unwanted litters of puppies and kittens that may end up homeless or later euthanized.

Vets often see reality. In some cases, people get puppies, the puppies get their puppy shots, and then are not seen or heard from again in years or until there is some type of emergency. In my eyes, the vet is doing much, MUCH less harm by spaying and neutering these dogs early because some owners won't come back to have it done. In these cases it ends up saving thousands in the long run, IMO. That's a good thing.
 

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I do not think that vet offices are "out to get your money."

A lot of vets recommend spay/neuter early because it can prevent unwanted litters of puppies and kittens that may end up homeless or later euthanized.

Vets often see reality. In some cases, people get puppies, the puppies get their puppy shots, and then are not seen or heard from again in years or until there is some type of emergency. In my eyes, the vet is doing much, MUCH less harm by spaying and neutering these dogs early because some owners won't come back to have it done. In these cases it ends up saving thousands in the long run, IMO. That's a good thing.
I had a really long, negative post written that I've decided against. All I can say is that if you think the above is a valid argument than by all means have your dogs mutilated. Why take responsibility when there's surgery?
 

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Park, Cam and Ty Rule!
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Why take responsibility when there's surgery?
I'm sorry, but most people are not equipped to handle an intact male or female dog, so I completely disagree that spaying/neutering is not doing the responsible thing. It's the responsible way to go for the majority of the population.

And I would hardly call it mutilation... unless of course you're chopping your dogs testicles off yourself...
 

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Grumpy Old Man
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The one thing that is clear, even the Veterinary profession is undecided on when to spay/neuter, or even if spay/neuter is right for your dog. As with many other things in life, you have to consider the source of the information you're receiving. Is the source concerned with you obtaining optimum results with YOUR dog? Or are their primary concerns focused elsewhere? You also have to consider your own living situation and lifestyle. What works for you?


No matter which way you choose to go, there are costs, risks and benefits to weigh. You're ****** if you do and ****** if you don't. There is no one single right answer, and one size does not fit all. That's why Spay/Neuter is such a contentious issue.

I don't usually spay or neuter my dogs until much later in life, and then only when there is a medical reason to do so. Keeping intact animals isn't all that difficult, but it does require that you pay attention to your dogs and keep track of them 100% of the time.
The most difficult part of keeping intact animals isn't containing your own dogs, It's keeping everybody else's out of control animals out of your yard and off of your property.
 

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I had a really long, negative post written that I've decided against. All I can say is that if you think the above is a valid argument than by all means have your dogs mutilated. Why take responsibility when there's surgery?
I really think that you've gone a bit too far by saying that early spay and neuter is mutilation. Is it ideal? NO. But just as hgatesy said below- many, many pet owners simply don't know enough and aren't equipped to handle the situation. In these cases, I think neutering before an unwanted litter is doing the responsible thing. I would rather have these dogs neutered early if their owners can't be sure that they'll be able to keep the dog under control during heat/around bitches in heat.

When I get my male puppy in the summer, I will be waiting to have him neutered until 12+ months. I understand the challenges and accept them, other pet owners may not.


I'm sorry, but most people are not equipped to handle an intact male or female dog, so I completely disagree that spaying/neutering is not doing the responsible thing. It's the responsible way to go for the majority of the population.

And I would hardly call it mutilation... unless of course you're chopping your dogs testicles off yourself...
Agreed.
 

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Mutilation? Then I guess I'm guilty of having my stunted puppy mill breeding dog, whom I adopted from rescue, mutilated. Having an animal spayed or neutered IS taking responsibility.
 

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I'm sorry, but most people are not equipped to handle an intact male or female dog, so I completely disagree that spaying/neutering is not doing the responsible thing. It's the responsible way to go for the majority of the population.

And I would hardly call it mutilation... unless of course you're chopping your dogs testicles off yourself...
If that's really the case, then most people aren't equipped to be dog owners. But, I don't believe that. Keeping an intact dog isn't rocket science. It just takes common sense, a leash and training.

As long as the dog is under anesthesia anyhow, let's snip their vocal cords...they may bark and disturb the neighbors. Maybe we can declaw them too, they may scratch someone. Oh, and as long as we're at it, those teeth are awfully sharp. Let's file them down. On second thought, let's just get a stuffed toy and be done with it.
 

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Mutilation? Then I guess I'm guilty of having my stunted puppy mill breeding dog, whom I adopted from rescue, mutilated. Having an animal spayed or neutered IS taking responsibility.
I'm sorry, but it's elective surgery as a convenience so that you can shirk your responsibility and still feel good about yourself. Controlling your dog is responsibility.

I had my Labrador, Kali spayed when she was seven months old because I was told it's the responsible thing to do....and had to deal with the consequences of it for a decade so far.
 

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I'm sorry, but it's elective surgery as a convenience so that you can shirk your responsibility and still feel good about yourself. Controlling your dog is responsibility.
So, I guess that would make me an irresponsible dog owner for having my 2 boys neutered when they are over 18 months old to prevent them from getting testicular cancer. Okay then...I guess that will make me a horrible, lazy dog owner. I'd better call and cancel Tucker's neuter appointment that we have scheduled for next month then. :no:
 

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Park, Cam and Ty Rule!
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If that's really the case, then most people aren't equipped to be dog owners.
Good golly... I'll agree with that one!

Keeping an intact dog isn't rocket science. It just takes common sense, a leash and training.
How about going and volunteering for your local rescue/spca for a few weeks? I'm sure you'll realize all too quickly how things really work.
As Swampcollie said...
it does require that you pay attention to your dogs and keep track of them 100% of the time.
However, a lot of people DON'T keep track of them 100%. A lot of dogs are chained outside or when put out to potty are just allowed to roam. So, although you and people on this site have the common sense to use a leash and train our dogs, I'm just pointing out that A LOT of people don't live by those rules.

On second thought, let's just get a stuffed toy and be done with it.
Funny you say that... I think quite a few current dog owners should have taken this advice prior to getting their pets.
 

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So, I guess that would make me an irresponsible dog owner for having my 2 boys neutered when they are over 18 months old to prevent them from getting testicular cancer. Okay then...I guess that will make me a horrible, lazy dog owner. I'd better call and cancel Tucker's neuter appointment that we have scheduled for next month then. :no:
It's a trade off. No chance of getting testicular cancer without testicles...but their odds of getting osteosarcoma is now much higher. Osteosarcoma occurs much more often in goldens than testicular cancer.

Read the NAIA article linked. The folks at NAIA have a definite agenda. So take it or leave it. Just don't blindly believe everything you read from the veterinary community, or some wacko on the internet like me.
 

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I think it's easy to think this way but have you ever actually worked in a local Humane Society and have you actually seen the number of dogs/cats euthanized before a animal control officer starts his/her day in the field???? Believe me, it is not a fun way for anyone to start their day. Especially when you are euthanizing healthy, adoptable animals that shouldn't be euthanized and are due to the irresponsible people that do not spay/neuter their animals. I STRONGLY suggest people spend some time in a shelter - perhaps for a month or so, and see what really goes on. I think it will change your mind completely.

I understand that there are some responsible people and do the right thing with intact animals, but you have to realize that a good majority in our country are not that responsible and the end result is unwanted puppies and kittens being euthanized each and every day.
 

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If that's really the case, then most people aren't equipped to be dog owners. But, I don't believe that. Keeping an intact dog isn't rocket science. It just takes common sense, a leash and training.

As long as the dog is under anesthesia anyhow, let's snip their vocal cords...they may bark and disturb the neighbors. Maybe we can declaw them too, they may scratch someone. Oh, and as long as we're at it, those teeth are awfully sharp. Let's file them down. On second thought, let's just get a stuffed toy and be done with it.
I'm sorry, but it's elective surgery as a convenience so that you can shirk your responsibility and still feel good about yourself. Controlling your dog is responsibility.

I had my Labrador, Kali spayed when she was seven months old because I was told it's the responsible thing to do....and had to deal with the consequences of it for a decade so far.
My original argument is that vets promote early spay and neuter was not because of financial gain, but because they want to help prevent the already overwhelming pet-overpopulation problem. Imagine these pets already filling humane societies were all intact and reproducing each cycle, our communities would be even more over burdened with wanted pets. Spaying and neutering a non-conformation dog is a responsible thing to do.

Last time I checked, owning a dog wasn't rocket science, you're right. It is the training part that takes some work. It isn't done by everyone b/c it isn't always easy and for that reason, those individuals should have their dog altered.

I understand that you think sterilizing an animal is a senseless surgery. I think euthanasia is senseless. Which hurts more?
 

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I'm sorry, but it's elective surgery as a convenience so that you can shirk your responsibility and still feel good about yourself.
I personally neutered my dogs because I was BEING responsible. Although all of my boys are wonderful, none of them would be classified as "breeding material"... I feel good knowing that none of them are capable of impregnated the neighbors dog and creating yet another litter of pups in this world. Although my dogs have been through years and years of training and I'm a responsible person, I'm sorry crap happens friend-o... accidents happen, you're ignorant if you think they don't. Even the most responsible person can have an oops moment. As I remember learning in health class many years ago... it only takes once.

Taking the necessary precautions to avoid contributing to the unwanted pet population is hardly "shirking your responsibility".

Besides, doesn't the vast majority of the human population practice safe sex? :bowl:
 
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