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Yuki's mom...Syd
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Discussion Starter #1
been a while since i posted. Yuki is grownup and healthy that makes me so happy. right now i have no idea how to deal with his behavior. i read some posts but they didnt help me much so i posted another thread.

he is humping my leg everytime he sees me. he grabs my leg very firmly and doesnt let go which makes me trip and fall sometimes. i cant shake him off and he doesnt respond to "off". he is humping everyone at home but i am the one who gets humped the most. i have tried giving him toys or treats to redirect his attention but he comes back with the toy and again grabs my leg. i know it isnt anything sexual but i would like the pup to stop this behavior.

the second problem is he jumps on anybody and chomps at their hand. my dad is scared the pup will bite "something important"....er... :eek: i hope others will get what i am trying to say.

everybody at home plays with him a lot and he is getting a lot of exercise too. he is usually well behaved and obedient. he is very active throughout the day and only sleeps when we sleep. his age is shown in the ticker below :)
 

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Beware of Nestle Purina
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5,715 Posts
Welcome back

Bumping up. I'm no help on this topic. My new addition is a jumping-humper too.
 

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Here is what My Breeder Trainer says about jumping

Jumping Up


The reason most dogs and puppies jump up on people is because they are happy and excited to see them! Jumping, leaping and bouncing are ways your dog shows affection and receives attention. The behavior is usually learned while they are puppies. When a puppy is very young, we usually sit on the floor, let them wiggle into our laps and allow them to lick and nuzzle up close to our face. When they come bounding over to greet us, jumping and stretching up to our knees, again we bend down, pick them up and exchange hugs and kisses. All this time we are training and rewarding the puppy for jumping up. Eventually we decide we don't like this behavior anymore. What used to be cute is now obnoxious and even dangerous if the dog is jumping up on children or the elderly.

The Jumping Problem Continues

Our inconsistency perpetuates the problem. Some of the time we tolerate the jumping and ignore it. Other times we reward the behavior by exchanging enthusiastic greetings. But when we're dressed up and the dog's paws are muddy, it's a different story. Reprimanding the dog for jumping up usually does not work. Either the dog misunderstands the reprimand as praise or he gets even more excited and the jumping gets worse. If the reprimand is severe enough, the dog may stop jumping at that moment but it doesn't solve the problem altogether; and it certainly is not a very nice thing to do. It's very similar to a person approaching you with a big smile, arm extended to exchange a hand-shake and you bopping the person in the nose. Even if your dog learns that jumping up on you is not a good idea, he will usually get away with jumping up on everyone else.

The End of the Jumping Problem

A better solution is providing your dog with an alternative method of greeting you and others. Teach your dog to sit-stay. He cannot sit-stay and jump up at the same time. This is especially important to us, because my 86 year old Grandma comes over a lot, and we don’t want any of our dogs to jump on her, possibly causing Grandma to loss her balance and fall. When puppy is sitting you can then kneel down and give him a warm hug or tell him what a good boy he is and pat him on his side or the front of his chest. . Practice is essential. If your dog is excitedly jumping up when you return home from work and this only happens once a day, then he is only getting one practice session a day. If he is jumping up on your company and you only have visitors once a week, then he is only getting one practice session a week. In order to perfect the proper greeting routine, your dog needs much more practice than that. You can speed up the training process by leaving through the back door and returning through the front door over and over again. When your friends come over, have them do the same. Each time, ask your dog to sit-stay before opening the door. At first his excitement will make it difficult for him to concentrate but after you've repeated this process 10 times, he will calm down and be able to concentrate. Before asking your dog to sit-stay in this distracting and exciting situation, be sure he has a reliable sit-stay in normal, non-stressful situations.

He also says that humping is about dominance and that you need to consistently let them know it is not acceptable. He suggests using some other command you may have taught your dog like SIT-STAY or DOWN-STAY

Biting behavior occurs because puppies have not been socialized. If it is out of fear that biting is occurring then socializing may help. if it is an extension of the puppy chewing, which is more likely, just tell him firmly NO and substitute a chew toy . When he chews on his toy praise him. The minute anything else is chewed or bitten, admonish with a firm NO (DO NOT YELL) and give him the chew toy again praising again when he chews on it.

One of the problems you may be having is your comment that everyone plays with him. This introduces the strong possibility that the boundaries the puppy is supposed to observe are not consistently enforced from person to person. This is difficult even with just a few people as visiting friends always find the puppy behavior of jumping or chewing or lap sitting cute and try to shame you into letting him do what he wants. Nothing could be worse for your puppy as it confuses him as to what is and is not appropriate behavior. Everyone who interacts with a dog must know the boundaries so that the dog behaves in a way consistently that is acceptable.
 

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Yuki's mom...Syd
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687 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
calistar thanks a bunch for the post. it really helped me a lot. :)
 

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Yuki's mom...Syd
Joined
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687 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
update:

Yuki has stopped jumping/humping after i followed the advice. :D he has started to sit and wag his tail as a greeting. sometimes he gets a toy of his choice and gives it to the person he is greeting and plays a game fetch instead of jumping and receives a lot of petting for being a good boy.
 
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