Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
396 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I want to establish trust with our new rescue, Sadie. I thought of hand-feeding her, as way to do that. Any other ideas?

Another issue is that she used to sleeping in bed with her humans. She was complaining about it last night. We insisted she sleep on her own bed, at the foot of our bed. I want to bond with her, but I need my sleep.

She also needs a diet. She weighs in at around 90 lbs... They have been feeding her 4 or 5 cans of Science diet a day, plus many treats. Should I change her diet right away?

Last thing, she is not used to a crate. Our dogs traveled in a crate. Do you have other suggestions for keeping her safe in the car?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Congrats on your new golden, and thank you for rescuing, such a cool thing. I ran into the same thing with my rescue about the bed situation, but since I am single I don't mind having her up there with me. She doesnt bother me. But at the end of the day you are the owner and you make the rules, she will adjust, I think it is important to not give in to the whimpering. If that is where you want her to sleep, sleep there she shall. :) I would transition the food to prevent any tummy upsets and diarrhea, I am not well versed on wet food portions so someone else can chime in with that. I think the leaner the better though, my vet says they are just like humans in that overweight dogs tend to run into health trouble earlier and die sooner. I try to watch Abby's weight at 53 pounds. (1 y/o female). In other words after my diversion, whatever you decide to do with her diet, try it slowly and give her time to adjust and i think you will be fine. I personally just like a high quality dry food for abby and feed a little under the directions on the package. Best of luck you and all of the above is just my opinion on things, others may differ!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,240 Posts
For the diet I would say start slowly so she doesn't have tummy upset and I would probably wait a couple weeks until she's settled. You can started cutting back the amount of food a bit and if you are using treats for training, maybe use the kibble you are going to switch her to in order to introduce it slowly. I've heard of a DVD called crate games. That would probably be a great way to build trust and get her used to the crate. She'll get used to her home, new family and new rules it will just take a little while. Thank you for rescuing her and enjoy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,925 Posts
To bond with a rescue/adopted dog and establish trust takes time. There is no one answer for you as every dog is an individual. Every one of mine have required different methods. Time and patience is the answer. Your new girl is reading and learning off you as you from her. Goldens are highly adaptable no matter their age IMO.

You will be amazed at how far and quickly they come along. There is no magic wand. This is a new life for the both of you, enjoy every moment and accomplishment. Warms the heart beyond belief, really does.

If you have a consistent steady schedule/routine, your dog will adapt quickly. If you live a life in chaos, that is much more difficult.

My 1st gal slept with me, but I didn't care. The other two do not care to sleep in my bed. Fine with me. They do however curl up on the floor beside my bed until I fall asleep, then they go to their own bed.

I would not change out the food right now but would decrease it a bit and maybe add green beans to make up the difference if need be. Fresh or frozen (thawed out of course). not the canned green beans, too high in salt. Have patience, this is way new stuff for the both of you.
 

·
newbie
Joined
·
207 Posts
I would suggest you cut back on the canned food and slowly switch her to a lower fat food such as Wellness® CORE® Reduced Fat Recipe.

In addition, increase her exercise slowly.

Use kibble for treats, but if she doesn't like that, try small pieces of dehydrated meat, as this is not fatty (pure protein, no carbs either).

Crate Games
videos:

You can also find more videos my searching crate games on youtube.

Often you start with the crate top open.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
396 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thank you all for your advice. She had a great first day. She just belongs here.
 

·
Dakota Katie River's Mom
Joined
·
1,684 Posts
I rescued a seven year old, Katie, who had never been in a house, let alone a crate, three weeks ago. I started out by feeding her next to the crate. Then I put her food just inside the open door of the crate. Gradually I moved it back further into the crate until she had to go all the way in to eat. At first I closed the door and sat down next to her. She now eats all the time in her crate and doesn't mind it. Anytime I put her in the crate she gets a treat if it's not time to eat. She came in with the opposite weight problem, you could see her ribs. I had to crate train quickly because in about a week and a half she has to be treated for heartworms. We keep the crate in the livingroom so she can see us at all times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,067 Posts
I believe dogs are like kids. They thrive with rules and consistency. Especially consistency. It doesn't have to be to the minute, but a schedule is a really good thing for helping a dog feel secure. Do the same things, say the same things. Expect the same behavior everyday (a sit-stay before being able to eat, for example).

The bond will happen as your dog begins to trust you.

As for the sleeping... my dog sleeps on my bed and doesn't keep me awake. If anything, it's ME who wakes her up if I'm tossing and turning! But I like her presence there.
 
  • Like
Reactions: khrios

·
Inactive
Joined
·
11,326 Posts
Just a couple of thoughts:

First, you're awesome for rescuing. Second, hand feeding is great for trust.

As far as the crate, I'd spend a few minutes, several times a day, acclimating her to the crate with the door open. I'm not sure how nervous she's getting, but if it's bad, you need to move really slowly and avoid confining her in it for a while. Just show her it's a cozy, safe place that doesn't trap her. Once she's totally relaxed, you can start working on closing the door briefly, rewarding, and opening it.

For the bed issue, teach her that there's a comfy spot on the floor for her. The closer it is to the actual bed, the easier this will be to teach, and if you have a dog bed, that would be ideal. If you don't, use an old towel to mark the spot so it's easier for her to see where you want her. When it's not bedtime, spend a few minutes showing her where you want to lie down, and tell her "go to your spot," rewarding her when she does. Make the spot a mellow, low-key place where rewards come to her. Work on training her to go to it while you stand a few feet away, and then run through the command while you're sitting in the bed. Reward generously throughout the process. Eventually, you should have a "go to your spot" command that works when she bugs you at bedtime. Plus, she should feel better about that spot, even though it's not up on the bed with her people.

Make all dietary changes slowly. Phase from the current food to the one you want her on slowly, and cut back the amount slowly. Since you might use treats for training frequently during the day, don't forget to account for all those extra calories. If she's a foodie, you can train with kibble and simply subtract what you gave as treats from her regular meal. Either way, amount is more important than brand or formula when it comes to food. A lean dog eating the worst food available will be better off in the long run than an overweight dog in premium kibble.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top