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I'm looking for a couple quality elevated feeding bowls for my two big Goldens. Seems like so many that I looked at online are cheap flimsy plastic. Does anyone have recommendations? Thanks in advance.
 

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I'm looking for a couple quality elevated feeding bowls for my two big Goldens. Seems like so many that I looked at online are cheap flimsy plastic. Does anyone have recommendations? Thanks in advance.
I have been using this (link below) for my dogs for the past 20 years. I use the 5 QT bowl as the kibble will lie flat in the bowl (if feeding a cup or so at a time). This keeps the dog from grabbing mouthfuls at a time and trying to gulp and eat to fast as well. Slowing their feeding helps keep them from gulping to much air. It also has telscoping legs to adjust the bowls to the perfect height.

 

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Head's up... Some studies have linked eating from elevated bowls to an increased risk for bloat. (see this link for one such study)

That said, if you are just looking for something to hold the bowls and get them a bit up off the floor, or if you have a dog who has other compelling reasons to need an elevated dish (such as arthritis that makes eating from the floor uncomfortable), you might want to take a look at Etsy.com for some creative and attractive options.

FWIW, my dogs' bowls go into low "holders" made of metal that looks like cast iron (Similar to this one but with shorter legs and it holds two bowls) and they've lasted us through several dogs and still look great!
 

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The main study for that came from Purdue University with an uncontrolled study of dogs at home with nothing on how they fed their dogs, raised or not and nothing about when feedings took place as in did they run and play and then fed, did they wait an hour after feeding before letting them play again.

I've feed all my dogs out of raised bowls, the one time I didn't and had to feed for a week from the floor (the feeder broke and waited for a new one to arrive) my Dane bloated at 11yo from gulping the food to the back of his mouth to swallow. Hanging the head down to the floor causes dogs to gulp to get the food to there back if the mouth. They do not great food and look up to chew and swallow. Raised bowls allows dogs to eat their food shovel like as to not gulp.

I've seen more than a few dogs bloat from eating at floor level but never from raised bowls.
 

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The main study for that came from Purdue University with an uncontrolled study of dogs at home with nothing on how they fed their dogs, raised or not and nothing about when feedings took place as in did they run and play and then fed, did they wait an hour after feeding before letting them play again.
I respect your opinion Eric, but I've seen more studies indicating that raised bowls increase the risk than otherwise. The link I provided is to a 2000 study published in the AVMA Journal, based on a study group of 1600+ dogs of varying high-risk breeds and concluded that " Approximately 20 and 52% of cases of GDV among the large breed and giant breed dogs, respectively, were attributed to having a raised feed bowl." I'm having trouble finding anything other than the abstract however, so I can't research how well the study controlled for the other mitigating factors you mention (or if its the same or a different study than the Perdue one you cited).

I still think it is worth being aware of the potential risks (or potential benefits) of using a raised food dish.
 

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As someone with a dog with Megaesophagus I will never again feed from the floor. I have a standing feeder that we built for Duke, my MegaE guy, and Moe eats with his bowl elevated to a comfortable level. Both drink from Dukes standing feeder and Moe's water outside is elevated to a comfortable height. Duke has been diagnosed with MegaE now for over a year and we are doing really well with our routine. We weren't given much hope at diagnosis.
 

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I respect your opinion Eric, but I've seen more studies indicating that raised bowls increase the risk than otherwise. The link I provided is to a 2000 study published in the AVMA Journal, based on a study group of 1600+ dogs of varying high-risk breeds and concluded that " Approximately 20 and 52% of cases of GDV among the large breed and giant breed dogs, respectively, were attributed to having a raised feed bowl." I'm having trouble finding anything other than the abstract however, so I can't research how well the study controlled for the other mitigating factors you mention (or if its the same or a different study than the Perdue one you cited).

I still think it is worth being aware of the potential risks (or potential benefits) of using a raised food dish.
I agree there more info the better but the Purdue study is the one that started all this in motion about reversing course on raised feeders and it was a very poorly done study and a free that I saw that followed used that study as a large reference point which is why I don't out a lot of stock in those studies. Admittedly I haven't seen anything new the last 3 or 4 years but I'll still stay with and recommend raised bowls and teach the dogs to eat slower which is very easy to accomplish.

I feel the biggest issue with bloat Anna gastric torsion is people let the dogs out when they come home, let them run for 30 min or so and when the dog comes in, drinks with a bit then they fed them. This in turn allowes the kibble to expand in the stomach creating a weight imbalance in the stomach. If the dogs go back out and run within the next hour, this makes it easy for the stomach to flip causing the gastric torsion or bloat.
 

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I have never used raised bowls, I'm on my third Golden.
My first golden lived to be 15 1/2, my second to 11 and my current boy is 11.


None of them had or have bloat.
 

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I didn't mean to hi-jack this thread to make it about the pros and cons of elevated feeders... Assuming the OP is aware of the pros and cons, I'm sure they'd appreciate more suggestions for elevated feeders that might meet their needs if they still want to go that route... :)
 

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I've never had a Golden with bloat either. One lived to be 15, two 13, Duke is 9, Moe is 2. I also had two Irish Setters in there and one was 16 when he passed. I never thought of elevating a food bowl until Duke was diagnosed with MegaE. After doing a lot of research and studying how dogs digest I made a personal choice to elevate all food and water bowls. Duke's are on a standing platform and angled exactly to his needs, that's extreme. Moe's are elevated enough that he doesn't reach down into them.

I'm in a different situation then most, but from the research I did on MegaE and the digestive track of a dog I made a personal decision. Dukes food is now blended, but I also add a little water to Moe's food after all I read.
 

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I don't think any of us mean that if you don't use a raise feeder that you will or will not get bloat and vice versa with feeding from the floor. If there was a definitive answer then there would be no discussion. were speaking from experience and what we have read and we have interpreted what we've read. :) the more info the better.
 

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I make my own raised tables for the dogs.
Been doing it since our first Golden 20+ years ago. Sometimes make them for friends and/or raffles.
Usually make them out of scraps from the shop.

This one is a couple years old now, but it's a cherry top with the legs and base being poplar. The legs are turned on the lathe and the table aprons are mortise and tenon construction. You could use it as a step stool if you wanted. :)

This is Sandy and Pebbles'. Sandy on the left, Pebbles on the right. They share the water. Mr. B has his own. I have to make a new one for the puppies soon as my old one only has 6 bowls. I need 7!
871392


871393
 

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I make my own raised tables for the dogs.
Been doing it since our first Golden 20+ years ago. Sometimes make them for friends and/or raffles.
Usually make them out of scraps from the shop.

This one is a couple years old now, but it's a cherry top with the legs and base being poplar. The legs are turned on the lathe and the table aprons are mortise and tenon construction. You could use it as a step stool if you wanted. :)

This is Sandy and Pebbles'. Sandy on the left, Pebbles on the right. They share the water. Mr. B has his own. I have to make a new one for the puppies soon as my old one only has 6 bowls. I need 7!
View attachment 871392

View attachment 871393
Wow! What a deluxe feeding table! :love:Sadly Tomo is still eating his food out of interactive feeders, balls, puzzle feeders, frozen kongs, snuffle mats, chilly penguins, etc. No table for him lolol!
 
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