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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I adopted a 13 month old male Golden 2 weeks ago and he is a well behaved, gentle boy.

I take him to a fenced in basketball court and throw the ball around at least twice a day. Last night, a Terrier type dog wanted in to play. I asked the owner if her dog was friendly and she said he was. The Terrier, who is the most hyper dog I've ever seen, immediately tried to mount my dog which didn't go down well and the fight was on. My dog let the Terrier know that he wasn't impressed. There were no bites, perhaps nips and lots of running around and growls from my dog. I called and called and called and he finally came to me. My dog has met other dogs with no problems whatsoever.

I know that this is going to happen time and time again but how can I relax during this? What should I be doing to stop a fight? Or how do I get hyper/aggressive dogs away from mine? I picked up on the signs (standing still, intense stare) but still wasn't able to get my dog to walk away. I was a wreck by the time we got home and don't want to impart my fear to my dog.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated and mods, if this is the wrong place for this thread please move.
 

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The first rule is to stay calm. Much, much easier said than done. The fact that your dog didn't draw blood, meant that he was giving a warning to the other dog. Mounting is a rude behavior! I don't see why people continue to let their dogs do it. It almost always ends up in at least a spat between dogs.
 

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Doesn't sound like there was a fight at all, simply a correction issued by your dog to let the other know whats acceptable. if there are no bites that cause holes they are displaying bite inhibition. I would call this more of a disagreement than a fight.

Steve
 

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Good for your new Golden! Those Terriers need to be put in their place.:) Seriously, I think you are the one that came away the most damaged in this skirmish. If you tense up every time a new dog comes up to meet and greet your golden then it will probably happen more. I would suggest no meet and greets until you know your dog and feel more comfortable. When you feel comfortable, I would not meet a new dog face to face only side to side. Perhaps, walk with them a few minutes or talk with the owners from a distance and see if their dog is pulling and misbehaving. If you feel comfortable then let the two meet if not tell them that your dog is a rescue dog and we had a bad experience and we are still working on training. Even if it is not your dog and it is theirs that is causing the problem. No one wants to hear, I don't want my dog to meet your dog because your dog is not under control. Believe me, they know when your golden is sitting their being a perfect angel and theirs isn't.

Best of luck !
 

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The terrier wasn't friendly, he was RUDE. If he wasn't going to take your dog's polite request to stop (when your dog stood still and gave the stare) then the next step was to tell the terrier off. If there was no blood or damage then I would leave it as your boy is reasonable when it comes to those things. Next time if possible/safe to do so step in and remove the little pest for him, so he will start to get the idea that you are there to help him.

Classes together might help, to work on bonding and some obedience, even if it's a trick class or agility etc...

Over time you might find he has his limits for certain behavior and you will get to know what will happen in most situations and where you need to step in and where he will manage himself. My boy here used to fly in when anyone pestered 'his' girls, and didn't matter what was going on. He settled down a lot, and the last time there was an issue, it was with a doodle who decided Storee was 'his' and kept joining us, over and over again, we'd stop and let the owner leash the dog and walk off, then as soon as the leash was off back he came... Ticket was pretty good and ignored him UNTIL the doodle snapped at him, then he told him off and what for, but no damage done really, and it was only then that the doodle owners decided to maybe take their 'wonderful' boy home and look into getting him snipped and into some classes...

Lana
 

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I'm just curious...when do you step in?

Woody, my two year old rescue golden, is a bit rude when it comes to playing with other dogs. He's got two dogs that he plays with on a regular basis and they all play hard but every once in a while it goes beyond play and I always step in right away to break it up. Both of these dogs seem to put up with quite a bit, they're both smaller than Woody - so Woody seems to have the upper hand.
My oldest brother has a lab that is the same size as Woody and is very people orientated but when it comes to other dogs she's not real friendly and frequently shows her teeth along with a growl or two when they do encounter other dogs.

We had them all loose in my yard, Woody and his dog, along with his kids who were playing soccer. They were actually doing pretty good...his dog was chasing the soccer ball and of course my goofy Woody was chasing his dog trying to get her to play with him, paws in the face, jumping on her back not humping but trying to initiate play, rude, but play orientated.

She finally said enough of this and went after him and Woody didn't back down - I broke it up right away so no blood was drawn. Woody was in the wrong, she wanted to play with the kids not Woody and she finally let him know.

Had I not broken it up I'm not sure what would have happened the two dogs being about evenly matched. Now my understanding is had it been a true fight there would have been puncture wounds, which there were none, no matter how quickly I'd stepped in.

Woody does need to be taught some manners - so at what point do you step in when another dog has had enough and gone into "correction time". I'd hate to see one of the dogs get injured.

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks to all for the suggestions. I am going to have to work on my staying calm and not anticipating trouble when other dogs come around. I know I took the experience much harder than my dog - didn't seem to phase him one bit while I was ready for a scotch.
 

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First of all for the original poster, I agree the terrier was rude, "perhaps" your dog did not need to be quite so adamant to be left alone but no harm was done. Yes unfortunately it does happen.

This to me is an interesting topic. I have the "opposite" problem with Teddi. She is OVERLY friendly, wants EVERYONE to be her BFF. Well Teddi that big dog over there baring it's teeth does not agree with you. She will get right in a dogs face so fast it is not funny. I hope every day she finds "the right dog" that puts her in her place but does not hurt her. She needs to learn, and if "I" always get in the middle she sees it as a human correction. She needs to learn from a dog. She has "improved" I can call her of "most" dogs now.

Last winter DH took her to the park for a walk. It was dark, she pooped, he put her in a sit to pick it up. Well while he was not paying attention, she went to greet a rott who came around the corner. Neither dog was leashed. That rott wanted no part of Teddi. It made horrible noises at her and chased her, however only "scared" her. When they rounded up the dogs, and made sure no one was hurt, Teddi was once again in her submissive pose asking to be best friends. :doh: Her saving grace she is the most submissive dog I have met. I don't know how to teach her.

Belle is fine in broad daylight, and usually ignores all other dogs even ones who get in her face. However dusk or darker she puts her protective cloak on. I do have to be more careful with her.

One last thing. I can not stand dogs that hump. I understand the whole dominance thing. However I have a casual friend whose dog is NOT neutered (dumb) and we were at an event, my arms were full, and I had Teddi on a leash. That dog was off leash and came over and climbed on her. It made me so mad, I could not get him off, no one would help me, and this was right before Teddi had her hip surgery. IT HURT HER TO HAVE HIM ON HER! Good thing your dog stood his ground.
 

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Speaking of rude, sorry I didn't mean to interrupt your post C's Mom. I'll move this over to the behavioral section where it should have been in the first place. :doh: :)

Pete
 

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Abby and Finn are very much doggie ambasadors. Both were raised in a large playgroup of many types of dogs. So if it is that group of dogs that get their panties in a knot, I ignore it and let them work it out. They have learned to give Gomar Bin Laden, the Jack Russell lots of space, because he loves to bite.

When we meet strange dogs off leash I know mine are going to run up to them, sniff and probably bow. If the other dog is not friendly, mine are back at my side in a nano second. I think it is as was previously posted, the dogs are communicating whether we know it or not.

And Abby and Finn are both very fast, not many dogs can catch them. Try and relax, time and socialization will be the key. Do not assume they are fighting when there is growling, it could be all in fun. But if there is blood, that is a different story.

A real dog fight is something I probably could not break up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Speaking of rude, sorry I didn't mean to interrupt your post C's Mom. I'll move this over to the behavioral section where it should have been in the first place. :doh: :)

Pete
No worries Pete.
(Cocasse just came up to me while I typed the above and burped. He does this every time he eats. Some would say that is rude of him but I think its his way of saying thank you.)
 

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Unfortunately, I have broken up more fights than I want to remember. The best thing you can do is keep yourself from being bitten while trying to pull the dogs apart. When Maddie would attack Jasmine, my husband would take Maddie and I would take Jasmine. Since Jasmine has had two FHOs, I would grab her by her tail or around her abdomen (this is not the recommended place to grab them! But I knew Jasmine was only trying to defend herself from Maddie and wouldn't redirect at me). I would have my husband wheelbarrow Maddie. As long as one of us didn't lose our grips, the fights would be ended in a matter of a minute or two. These were true fights where Maddie was hellbent on injuring (and probably, if she could have, killing) Jasmine. There was always bloodshed and it was always Jasmine who was injured. Jasmine never injured Maddie back.

I always forgot the "don't yell" part though. I was usually cussing and yelling at them the entire time. I would also get Jasmine outside and away from Maddie and literally collapse, shaking afterwards. It's amazing what your adrenaline will do!
 

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To break up a true dog fight, ideally 2 people will each grab a dog by the hind legs and "wheel barrow" them away from each other in circles. Because you are doing it in circles the dogs HAVE to focus on side-stepping and cannot easily focus on trying to get you. If the dog does try to get at you, the dog will simply trip over itself.
 

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my advice would be not to panic, but to step in and break it up as soon as possible to avoid escalation and possible injuries. Dog fights are no fun to watch, but most of them are less serious than they sound.

The terrier introduced himself rather rudely, and your doggie had every right to tell him what to go do to himself.
 
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