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My puppy she is 5 months old and she treats my daughter sweetly. However, she sees my 8 years old daughter as litter mate. My daughter get along with the puppy very well and she is very protective of the dog, but a lot of time she treats her rough, I don't mean she hits the dog or beats her, she just... you know... doing kid things, she plays rough.

Today, my dog had a piece of napkin in her mouth and my daughter rushed to her trying to take the napkin out of her mouth and she bit her. It punchered her skin and you can see some blood but it's a very mild injury....

Does it mean my dog has a bite history, and it's aggressive now?
 

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IKE- Canine Blood Donor
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Was it an accidental bite or was your pup being possessive of the napkin?
It's not a good idea for a child to put their hands in a dog's mouth. A bite can happen even when not intentional. I hope your daughter's hand feels OK.

If the pup was being possessive of the napkin, then you might want to talk with your Vet about it and possibly contact a pet behaviorist.
 

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Was it an accidental bite or was your pup being possessive of the napkin?
It's not a good idea for a child to put their hands in a dog's mouth. A bite can happen even when not intentional. I hope your daughter's hand feels OK.

If the pup was being possessive of the napkin, then you might want to talk with your Vet about it and possibly contact a pet behaviorist.
I was not there at the time it happened, even if I did I am not sure if I can tell the difference between accidental bite or possessive. The dog looked so sorry after it happened and she even tried to lick her after the bite.
 

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IKE- Canine Blood Donor
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I bet it was an accident. Just recently there was a thread about 'bites' and how often they are accidental from a hand getting near a dog's mouth and catching a tooth.

A possessive bite would probably be preceded by a growl or aggressive stance. Have you ever noticed her exhibit either of these before?
 

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I was not there at the time it happened, even if I did I am not sure if I can tell the difference between accidental bite or possessive. The dog looked so sorry after it happened and she even tried to lick her after the bite.
Licking and showing remorse are signs that it was accidental. An aggressive dog wouldn't do this. Accidental bites happen alot, especially with puppies.
 

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Was there another adult monitoring their play? Without an adult to see what happened it is all guessing.
The pup could have thought your daughter was playing when grabbing the napkin and they both grabbed at the same time and she got your daughter along with the napkin. Or the dog could have been attempting to keep the napkin in a resource guarding situation.
I really wouldn't let them play rough anymore. Whether it was an accidental bite or an out right bite your daughter could have been hurt even worse.
Children and dogs must be supervised at all times. To protect them both.

At this point I don't think you should let your daughter take anything away from the dog.
For now I would practice (train) your dog to trade, drop, leave it and give. At this point only with adults.

Did you seek medical treatment for the bite? If you did what are the laws where you live? If professional medical treatment wasn't needed then the only bite history, is with you. And again since you don't know exactly what happened I would be especially careful to supervise all interactions for now.

A bite does not always mean the dog is aggressive.

How is your daughter doing?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Was there another adult monitoring their play? Without an adult to see what happened it is all guessing.
The pup could have thought your daughter was playing when grabbing the napkin and they both grabbed at the same time and she got your daughter along with the napkin. Or the dog could have been attempting to keep the napkin in a resource guarding situation.
I really wouldn't let them play rough anymore. Whether it was an accidental bite or an out right bite your daughter could have been hurt even worse.
Children and dogs must be supervised at all times. To protect them both.

At this point I don't think you should let your daughter take anything away from the dog.
For now I would practice (train) your dog to trade, drop, leave it and give. At this point only with adults.

Did you seek medical treatment for the bite? If you did what are the laws where you live? If professional medical treatment wasn't needed then the only bite history, is with you. And again since you don't know exactly what happened I would be especially careful to supervise all interactions for now.

A bite does not always mean the dog is aggressive.

How is your daughter doing?
Thanks for asking, she is fine and the bite was very very mild. A bandage with Nimo's picture on it made her smile right away.

What would it mean if it was a resource guarding situation?
 

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From what you're describing, it sounds like a purposeful bite - the dog wanted to keep the napkin and used the amount of force necessary to make your daughter back off.

Kids (under at least 10), IMO, should not be unsupervised around dogs. It's too easy for something like this to happen. It's also worrisome that you say your daughter plays rough with her. If she's doing things the dog doesn't like - even if they aren't abusive - it's potentially damaging the relationship between daughter/dog and teaching the dog some bad habits. Both kids and dogs need to be taught how to coexist and treat each other with respect. Playing "rough" is not that respectful, IMO.

Many dogs have issue with stolen objects being taken from them. (Do a search...) I'd suggest a new house rule -- if puppy gets something she's not supposed to have, the kids must COME GET YOU and you use it as a training exercise to practice happily relinquishing prized objects on request. Better yet - she won't have to come get you b/c there would be little to no unsupervised time between them. By keeping them supervised, you can not only prevent unwanted behavior on both their parts, but can also reward the dog for being tolerant of low-level kid-induced annoyances and/or making the right decision to get up and leave when feeling uncomfortable by a child's handling, etc. BTW - "rushing" a dog is often seen as a sign of conflict and can put many dogs on the defensive.

Your situation reminds me of cases where ... after a bite ... it comes out that the kid in question was doing stuff to totally annoy the dog while unsupervised. Not abusive in the least, but if the dog doesn't like it, he doesn't like it... and will only put up with so much before using his resources (growling ... hard stare ... lip curl, etc. ... then the bite) Kids are going to totally miss the warning signs, so you end up with a bite.
 

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Thanks for asking, she is fine and the bite was very very mild. A bandage with Nimo's picture on it made her smile right away.

What would it mean if it was a resource guarding situation?
Resource guarding means the dog is willing to use threats and/or acts of aggression to keep what he has ... like the napkin.

As I mentioned, lots of dogs will resource guard stolen objects - especially when they live in a household where people are constantly rushing over and trying to pry objects out of their mouth (vs. teaching a peaceful relinquishment of the item -- combined with management to lessen the number of times the dog manages to get a hold of stuff).
 

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I'd suggest a new house rule -- if puppy gets something she's not supposed to have, the kids must COME GET YOU
We have this rule in our house because even though Dakota is one of the most mild mannered Goldens I have ever seen/heard of, my 6 year old once got scratched by a tooth when she tried to take a crayon out of her mouth. I saw the whole thing happen and in this case it was my daughter's fault as she dropped a crayon, Dakota grabbed it and ran. Lauren, my daughter, ran after her and I told Lauren to stop but she didn't listen and reached into Dakota's mouth to get it and when she pulled her hand out she scrapped her hand on one of Dakota's teeth. I saw the whole thing but my daughter immediately started screaming that Dakota bit her. Because I saw it I was able to use it as a teaching moment for her and explain the situation but Dakota could easily have hurt her as her jaw is very very powerful and I've seen what she can do to her toys:doh: so our rule is to never go near Dakota's mouth, no matter what.

I'm glad that your daughter was not hurt and hopefully you are able to use this as a teaching moment also.
 

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The other day I had Bayne in the house with me and he got a little playful, jumped up at me and stepped on my sore foot, I yelled out 'ouch', he immediately stopped and went down to the floor. But what happened next was amazing, my white cat came running and stood between me and Bayne and started hissing at Bayne, like he was protecting me. I put Bayne in the kitchen and then went to show Louie that I was ok. Really surprised me.
 

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I taught my 8 year old grandson only to trade if Jaro has something bad in his mouth. Make sure it is on the ground, then give him the treat before you take it up. Sometimes Jaro is too quick and it takes two treats. I doubt your puppy was being aggressive.
 
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