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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I’m new to this forum I literally just joined. Please forgive me if this post isn’t in the right place. I have a vet appointment for my beautiful boy coming up Tuesday. I’m so worried about this growth on my best friend. His name is Jacob and he is 9 years old . I’ve attached a picture of the lump. Does anyone have a idea of what it could be? Thanks
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Please help ease my mind and forgive me if this post is in the wrong place I literally just joined. I have a golden boy named Jacob who is my very best friend and he has a pretty fast growing lump on his back . I will include pictures. I have a vet appointment for Tuesday but I was hopeful someone with experience could help ease my mind . Does anyone know what this is?
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Kate
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It is a tumor. Look up histiocytoma - which is basically a benign tumor. There's scarier tumors out there, but I'd leave that to your vet to discuss with you and rule out. As well, there are a lot of warty growths which middle aged to old dogs get - which owners keep an eye on, but don't need to do anything about unless they get irritated/infected and are bothering the dog.

I'm a little concerned looking at the pictures, because it's unclear how big it is. First reaction was basically holy crow that's huge.

I suggest you feel around the area - can you move the skin around fairly easily?

If you can and it's fairly clear that the tumor is not deeper than the top layer or so of skin, that is probably a good thing. It is more likely to be benign... but also easier to remove it needs to go. But get it checked by your vet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
It is a tumor. Look up histiocytoma - which is basically a benign tumor. There's scarier tumors out there, but I'd leave that to your vet to discuss with you and rule out. As well, there are a lot of warty growths which middle aged to old dogs get - which owners keep an eye on, but don't need to do anything about unless they get irritated/infected and are bothering the dog.

I'm a little concerned looking at the pictures, because it's unclear how big it is. First reaction was basically holy crow that's huge.

I suggest you feel around the area - can you move the skin around fairly easily?

If you can and it's fairly clear that the tumor is not deeper than the top layer or so of skin, that is probably a good thing. It is more likely to be benign... but also easier to remove it needs to go. But get it checked by your vet.
In response to the size of it, well only one month ago it looked like this.
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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
[Before that he didn’t have a bump. I’m used to him having Lipoma’s I know that they move around this is a little different. it’s not really a movable lump it seems to be attached. Thanks for your help.[/QUOTE]
 

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I would ask for it to be aspirated. My boy had what I thought was a lipoma that turned out to be a Mast Cell Tumor (MCT). They are known as the great masqueraders because they can look like benign things. It’s not worth the risk to just leave it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hi! I merged both your threads together so all of the responses would be in the same place. I also moved it to a sub-forum where it may get more attention. :)
Hi! I merged both your threads together so all of the responses would be in the same place. I also moved it to a sub-forum where it may get more attention. :)
thank you so very much. I really appreciate the help 💕
 

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Kate
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Yes, it’s definitely rooted and attached. In your experience is that cancer? Or is there a possibility it’s not .
I very vaguely remember one of my dogs had a growth on his chest which had been biopsied because the vet said it felt more hard and fixed than the typical fatty tumor. That turned out to be benign - so there is some hope yet, but you absolutely need to get this checked out.

Basically you are looking at the vet first doing an aspiration to check for cancer cells. If they find them, then you are looking at the vet doing chest xrays and bloodwork to see if the cancer has spread.

Based on appearance, size, feel, etc... of the tumor - your vet may recommend removing the tumor (where Robin above says remove with wide margins to ensure that all of it is removed - and this is thankfully possible when removing from the dog's back or side where there is typically plenty of skin). But to reiterate, your vet will likely not take this step if dog does not clear xrays and other tests which show that the cancer has spread.

But before you get too far ahead, there is a likelihood that this may be a benign tumor based on the aspiration/needle test. And then if it's cancer, then there is a chance that it has not spread yet. Take it one step at a time.

I only experienced a possible cancer with one dog who had a very bad lesion on one of his toes. This combined with lesions on his nose had our vet strongly discouraging any treatment because she felt it was likely an aggressive type of cancer which had already spread. My personal take four years later is wishing we'd at least done the biopsy, because there is a possibility that was not cancer but a serious fungal infection which I lost my other dog (his buddy) to almost two years later.

I've seen fatty tumors and other growths on dogs - but I will say that I've never had one that did not pass the "wiggle" test. Other than the one mentioned above.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I very vaguely remember one of my dogs had a growth on his chest which had been biopsied because the vet said it felt more hard and fixed than the typical fatty tumor. That turned out to be benign - so there is some hope yet, but you absolutely need to get this checked out.

Basically you are looking at the vet first doing an aspiration to check for cancer cells. If they find them, then you are looking at the vet doing chest xrays and bloodwork to see if the cancer has spread.

Based on appearance, size, feel, etc... of the tumor - your vet may recommend removing the tumor (where Robin above says remove with wide margins to ensure that all of it is removed - and this is thankfully possible when removing from the dog's back or side where there is typically plenty of skin). But to reiterate, your vet will likely not take this step if dog does not clear xrays and other tests which show that the cancer has spread.

But before you get too far ahead, there is a likelihood that this may be a benign tumor based on the aspiration/needle test. And then if it's cancer, then there is a chance that it has not spread yet. Take it one step at a time.

I only experienced a possible cancer with one dog who had a very bad lesion on one of his toes. This combined with lesions on his nose had our vet strongly discouraging any treatment because she felt it was likely an aggressive type of cancer which had already spread. My personal take four years later is wishing we'd at least done the biopsy, because there is a possibility that was not cancer but a serious fungal infection which I lost my other dog (his buddy) to almost two years later.

I've seen fatty tumors and other growths on dogs - but I will say that I've never had one that did not pass the "wiggle" test. Other than the one mentioned above.
I appreciate you taking the time to respond and tell me about your experiences. Tuesday seems like so far away and I guess I’m just scared . One step at a time you are right.
 

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Our golden boy had a fair number of lumps and bumps and warty things when he was an old man, including some tumors that had to be removed. I know it’s really scary, but try not to worry—you are taking the best care of him you can by getting him in to see the vet as soon as possible. My girl and I are both cheering you on (she’s trying to help me type this 😅) and hoping for the best outcome for you and your sweet boy. And be sure and post an update after your appointment!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Our golden boy had a fair number of lumps and bumps and warty things when he was an old man, including some tumors that had to be removed. I know it’s really scary, but try not to worry—you are taking the best care of him you can by getting him in to see the vet as soon as possible. My girl and I are both cheering you on (she’s trying to help me type this 😅) and hoping for the best outcome for you and your sweet boy. And be sure and post an update after your appointment!
Thank you so much for the encouraging words and prayers I appreciate it so much . I will for sure give a update . I’m so glad I found this forum 💕
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Sensitive content, not recommended for those under 18
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It is a tumor. Look up histiocytoma - which is basically a benign tumor. There's scarier tumors out there, but I'd leave that to your vet to discuss with you and rule out. As well, there are a lot of warty growths which middle aged to old dogs get - which owners keep an eye on, but don't need to do anything about unless they get irritated/infected and are bothering the dog.

I'm a little concerned looking at the pictures, because it's unclear how big it is. First reaction was basically holy crow that's huge.

I suggest you feel around the area - can you move the skin around fairly easily?


If you can and it's fairly clear that the tumor is not deeper than the top layer or so of skin, that is probably a good thing. It is more likely to be benign... but also easier to remove it needs to go. But get it checked by your vet.
In response to how big it is I’ve attached another picture. Our appointment is tomorrow🙏
*not sure why the photo is labeled sensitive 18 and ⬆ It’s just the same lump next to a dime for size reference *
 

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You’ve gotten great input but I thought I’d add something else to keep in mind. Once they test it, if they think it needs to be removed, depending on what type they think it is, consider going to a specialist for removal. We had a dog with a MCT and our vet did the initial removal but it came back with bad margins and we ended up needing a specialist for a second surgery. Would have been much more effective (both for the dog and my bank account!) to just go with the specialist the first time.
 
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