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Goldens have a variety of coat types. Some are naturally smellier than others. Some take a long time to dry off after swimming and some dry off very fast. I don't know why more people with sensitive noses or allergies don't get standard poodles. They are wonderful, smart, and easily trained. Originally a hunting dog. Perhaps when people look at poodles they are overwhelmed by the thought of maintaining the show coat. However, they can be kept in a short coat easily. The doodles will not have a reliably easy-care or hypoallergenic coat but the purebred poodles will.
 

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I never got the Goldens smell thing. I thought Luke, my last Golden, smelled wonderful. Logan smells nice too. Swimming in our pool in the summer may help. I groom regularly, but don’t overdo it.

I’m not around labs, but my daughter has a pug and that short hair is a bear to try to get up.
 

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I love the smell of my golden, even when she starts smelling "doggy". :) But I groom her regularly and have noticed that times when I brush her less she will smell a bit more. It doesn't bother me, but I would not call goldens low odor dogs especially when comparing to other breeds. I think it is very individual and some smell more than others, though frequent bathing and grooming does make a big difference. But in my experience, it does seem like labs get a grimy feel to their coat sooner than goldens when not groomed regularly.
 

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This is what I learned from my honest retired vet.
Commonly dogs that get that doggy smell (caused by overgrowth of yeast that feeds a fungus in the dog that causes that smell and oily coat and can cause itching. Yeast is fed by feeding dry kibble because kibble usually contains a lot of sugar, though pet food industry is not required to put sugar in the ingredients. Wheat, corn and soy also feeds the yeast which causes the fungal overgrowth in the body, which again produces oily skin, oily coat, doggy smell which is smell from the yeast overgrowth and fungus inside the dog and fungus on the skin.
I switched my golden to Complete Raw, NO HPP to maintains the nutrients, the complete has meat, bones, organs, veggies, fruit and some supplements.
Sprinkle CHIA seeds on the food for extra fiber and firm poop.
Add a raw organic EGG another way to add raw food for a healthier diet.

Over a few weeks or less, the itching stopped, doggy smell gone after a bath, rinse, towel dry, and rub white vinegar thru out the coat to kill any yeast on the skin and hair.
This resolved the problem. No more itching, no more doggy smell, no more oily coat.
I still feed APPLE slices and BANANA slices as treats, etc, healthy real food treats. Avoid treats made with lots of wheat, corn, soy or sugar, as this all feeds yeast. Real fruit is not a problem.
Smelly dogs or dogs with an oily coat is Not caused by the breed, it is more caused by the diet.
If you must continue to feed kibble because you cannot find raw or do not want to feed eggs.
Then give a GARLIC supplement and a FENUGREEK supplement, those supplements kill off the overgrowth yeast in the body, which stops the itching. It will help reduce the doggy smell and oily coat too.
I put the supplements stuffed in the raw food and feed it by hand and my Golden eats it up.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
This is what I learned from my honest retired vet.
Commonly dogs that get that doggy smell (caused by overgrowth of yeast that feeds a fungus in the dog that causes that smell and oily coat and can cause itching. Yeast is fed by feeding dry kibble because kibble usually contains a lot of sugar, though pet food industry is not required to put sugar in the ingredients. Wheat, corn and soy also feeds the yeast which causes the fungal overgrowth in the body, which again produces oily skin, oily coat, doggy smell which is smell from the yeast overgrowth and fungus inside the dog and fungus on the skin.
I switched my golden to Complete Raw, NO HPP to maintains the nutrients, the complete has meat, bones, organs, veggies, fruit and some supplements.
Sprinkle CHIA seeds on the food for extra fiber and firm poop.
Add a raw organic EGG another way to add raw food for a healthier diet.

Over a few weeks or less, the itching stopped, doggy smell gone after a bath, rinse, towel dry, and rub white vinegar thru out the coat to kill any yeast on the skin and hair.
This resolved the problem. No more itching, no more doggy smell, no more oily coat.
I still feed APPLE slices and BANANA slices as treats, etc, healthy real food treats. Avoid treats made with lots of wheat, corn, soy or sugar, as this all feeds yeast. Real fruit is not a problem.
Smelly dogs or dogs with an oily coat is Not caused by the breed, it is more caused by the diet.
If you must continue to feed kibble because you cannot find raw or do not want to feed eggs.
Then give a GARLIC supplement and a FENUGREEK supplement, those supplements kill off the overgrowth yeast in the body, which stops the itching. It will help reduce the doggy smell and oily coat too.
I put the supplements stuffed in the raw food and feed it by hand and my Golden eats it up.
Thanks for your view! I personally do believe it has to do with the breed to an extent. Not 100% breed but I believe some breeds are just more prone to yeast/ oily coats. I do feed dry kibble. I don’t feel comfortable feeding raw at this time. For a few reasons 1.) my vet recommends against it because there is just not enough data on it 2.) I have young children and would worry about salmonella. I read a young child got salmonella poisoning from their dog who licked the child after eating raw. 3.) isn’t it quiet expensive? I’m not sure but from my research it seems to be pricey.
I am looking into ways to help my dogs coat/skin through diet so I appreciate the info on the supplements and will look into it further. I’ve been using a mix of apple cider vinegar and water on her after baths per her veterinarians recommendation but I haven’t seen any difference to be honest.
 

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Before I went to raw, I went from kibble to canned, then to fresh cooked, or freshpet from the grocery store, then some raw, then finally to raw. Start with cooked food. Add a cooked egg to the food. Or add some FreshPet.com pet food (sold at costco and some grocery stores), on top of the kibble. That is a way to get started on weaning off of kibble. Many feed cooked food to their dogs and find the results are a big improvement over kibble, as kibble is highly processed fast food, read more at Pet Food Pets Die For by Ann Martin pet food researcher to really understand pet food. When money is tight, go with what you can afford. Add a cooked egg or raw egg depending on your preference. I found an affordable frozen ground raw NO HPP complete with meat, bones, organs, veggies, fruit and supplements all mixed together at the local livestock feed store in their freezer. Pet stores raw food is way too expensive for me. There are other options like dehydrated raw and dehydrated cooked food, and freeze dry pet food that is available at onlynaturalpet online and other pet stores or online pet stores. I bought several huge boxes of dehydrated pet food stew with meat and veggies at onlynaturalpet as backup when the electric is turned off soon and now buying up canned pet food as well so I am prepared with backup food that does not need refrigeration, when frozen raw pet food is not available. I have had Goldens for many years so I have learned that goldens are very sensitive to any chemicals so natural works better and with help from a retired vet with goldens, who knows a lot about true pet health to help guide me thru the years to much healthier goldens. Out dog walking, meet lots of young dogs with so many health issues but VitalAnimal can help teach many to improve pets health. I think now I spend less than most, as no health issues.
 

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I have a lab and a golden and neither have the doggy smell. My dogs are indoor with walks and play outside. They are bathed about every 6 weeks or so. That is the number one thing that people comment on is that my dogs have no smell. I do wash their bedding frequently and I think that makes a big difference.
My Maggie is 18 months and 50 lbs.

Jules
 

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Watson is 3/4 Golden and 1/4 Yellow Lab. He has never had a smell, even when being outside a lot in the summer. Family has commented on how he never smells like a dog. He smells like nothing. Weird. I only bathe him twice a year. Might be combination of the breeds. He is also, just for the record, the BEST dog I have ever owned 😁 Sweet, smart, awesome personality.
 

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I have had a Lab for 14 years now and the only times he smells is: when he gets an ear infection, or in the summer months when he is constantly in the water (if you dry their coats you won't have this issue). Labs are not smelly dogs in general.
 

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One of the things I’ve disliked most about dogs for my whole life is how they smelled. Their coats, their breath. But Oliver doesn’t smell like any dog I’ve ever smelled. His breath has no smell whatsoever to me. He is bathed once or twice a week and blow dried. I think blow drying is the secret but I couldn’t tell you for certain since he’s my first golden. His feet smell amazing. Like the faint scent of a Fritos bag lol. Sometimes his ears get a musty smell if they don’t dry properly which is hard to do with a blow dryer. The awesome thing about their coats is their superb wicking ability. Oliver can jump in my horses water trough, roll around in the sand and eventually dry off and be able to sit on the couch and not leave a mark! No smell. Nothing. He will be kept intact and is fed Purina pro plan, which I believe diet plays an important roll as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
I have had a Lab for 14 years now and the only times he smells is: when he gets an ear infection, or in the summer months when he is constantly in the water (if you dry their coats you won't have this issue). Labs are not smelly dogs in general.
maybe I’m just more sensitive to smells and dog oils in general. I’ve grown up with labs since I was 8 and they have always had a oily feel to their coat and are more of a smelly dog in my opinion. My lab mix used to get ear infections all the time when I first adopted her but we have a routine now with a ear wash that actually works for her and she hasn’t had a ear infection for a long time. She does have allergies, which I stated before. It’s so difficult to get allergies under control. 😞 I’ve noticed some poodles have the same oily feel to their coats, German Shepards too. I had a Lhasa Apso in the past and he never had the oily feel and doggy smell. Thank you for all your input everyone!
 

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Bummer! I may still get a Golden if I can’t find another breed that fits the personality I want. Any suggestions?
Looking for:
-about medium size 30-65lbs
-good with people/kids (I have young children)
-good with other animals (I have a cat)
-willingness to please
-somewhat easy to train
-can learn good recall
-somewhat active. We go on hikes a lot and I do run about 3 miles but not everyday. I like Vizsla but I’m worried I may not be active enough for one!
A Golden sounds like the perfect dog, sorry. Get them from a good breeder and you will most likely avoid some of the health issues. Also, I don’t find goldens are as greasy/smelly as labs, and I don’t think really well bred retrievers smell as much as poorly bred ones. Goldens’ fur isn’t as coarse either—longer and softer. Keep them well groomed, bathe every once and a while, brush regularly, and you’ll be fine. Add in a omega 3/fish oil supplement and keep it on a good dog food for healthy skin and coat. My field golden runs in the woods, hardly ever gets a bath (and I’m a dog groomer, lol) and he is neither smeller nor greasy. Goldens are some of the best dogs. You will not be sorry if you get one 😊
 
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