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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi-
We just lost our beautiful Koby last week, and we know at some point we want another golden to love and to keep our 4 year old golden, Kai, happy. We mainly are looking at puppies, but the waiting lists are so long. One thing we've definitely considered is a rescue (though not sure how Kai would adapt to an older dog.....). The problem I'm running into is the requirement for a fenced yard.

We live in a subdivision with 3-10 acre lots, and ours is about 3 1/2. We have a huge front yard, and the dogs love it - We throw balls, they run around, and basically have a blast. They are never outside without one of us there to watch them. I know we won't be fencing - the only fence allowed in our subdivision is a 3' split rail in the back yard, and our front yard is the open area - back is all woods, for the most part. Plus, we hope to retire and sell in a couple years.

Does anyone know of any adoption that doesn't absolutely require a fenced yard? I know how much love we have to give, and we've had goldens in this yard for 30 years without ever having a problem........

(our yard, below)

Thanks-
Theresa
 

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You have to call and speak to them. When I was considering a rescue, it was from a "no fence, no adoption" policy place. I called and spoke to the person in charge and she said I'd provide a great home for a rescue. I don't even have a yard, nevermind a fence. So I'd say, don't take a written policy at face value. They might be willing to make exceptions.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
You have to call and speak to them. When I was considering a rescue, it was from a "no fence, no adoption" policy place. I called and spoke to the person in charge and she said I'd provide a great home for a rescue. I don't even have a yard, nevermind a fence. So I'd say, don't take a written policy at face value. They might be willing to make exceptions.
Thanks - that gives me hope!!!
 

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I did not find that to be true where I am. No fence meant no consideration for us. We live on a wooded acre on a steep hillside. Fencing just will not be effective. We are in a rural area with open fields for game play. We walk our dogs on leash... but could not find a golden rescue that would consider us.


If you do find one to work with you, find a fenced area and practice recall. I have friends that lost a rescue who bolted. It takes a bit longer for an older dog to bond and know where home is.

As frustrating as the no fence rule is, there is a reason for it.
 

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I hesitated to respond for fear this will turn into a rescue-bashing thread.

I agree with SweetGirl. Call the rescues in your area and depending on your location, your situation and the number of available dogs, some rescues are willing to make case-by-case decisions.

When I was ready for a new dog in 2011, I knew we didn't want a puppy and so I began looking at rescue groups. Many of them didn't want to talk to me when I said I don't have a fenced yard. Some were borderline rude about it. I definitely found that frustrating, but understood the reasoning.

At last, we came across a GR with some "baggage". He was dog-reactive, had lived in several homes and he had to be the only pet which made him much more difficult to place. The other rule was having a region-specific adoption area. I lived outside that area. I had several conversations with the rescue coordinator and developed a bit of a relationship with them.

Because of Chum's issues and my relationship with the rescue, they decided to bend their rules and take a leap of faith in letting us adopt him. We haven't let them down. Chumlee continues to thrive with us and is living a great life because of the rescue group's flexibility. We continue to keep in touch with the rescue with regular updates and I hope that sometime in the future this will help us adopt another rescue Golden from them.

It isn't always easy, but with some effort on your part you may be able to adopt a rescue Golden even without a fence.

The other avenue you may want to consider is to contact your breeder to see about the possibility of adopting a dog they are retiring from their breeding program. You've already purchased a puppy from them awhile ago, so that could open some doors.
 

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I would call the Rescue and speak with them. I used to help a GR Rescue in my State, they stopped operating several years ago.

Exceptions were often made, a lot of it depends on the dog(s) available for adoption and if the applicant is an experienced owner, usually ones that were previous Golden owners were given priority.

You may want to check out the info I posted in this thread-

http://www.goldenretrieverforum.com...-groups/492745-warrior-canine-connection.html
 

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Koby's Mom

Koby's Mom

When we adopted our Smooch in 2000, from Golden Opportunities Golden Ret. Rescue In Illinois, we were upfront from the start with them about not having a fully fenced yard. We lived in a Townhome that had a fence around the back of the townhomes, but not along the sides. When Beth came out for a home visit we assured her that our dogs were never off the leash when we took them out, and they never were, and they let us adopt.

I agree with everyone, that I would call the rescue and tell them the situation and hopefully they will make an exception, if they have a fenced yard as a requirement.
 

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I hope this forum entry encourages adoption agencies to realize exceptions NEED to be made. Many times, this will insure a better home for their dogs as well.

I live in a rural area. Many people here have from 10 to 500 acres. With such large properties, "fenced" takes on a whole new meaning. And face it, many of these "fenced yards" wouldn't keep a dog in anyway. The fences are more like property designation. We have only 6 acres, and our fence circles the property, but it is the type of fence that wildlife (deer and elk) can trespass through our property. My 2 Goldens are never outside without either myself or my husband being present. But they love to run and play on the grass and in and out of the ponds.

I say all this only to bring to light what a shame it would be if a rescue turned down this type of property, when it is perfect, especially for a "field type" of dog like a Golden Retriever. Of course I understand their wanting to insure a good home. But hopefully they can be flexible enough to check a situation out, and change their ruling when it is warranted. They could be sending an active dog to a small enclosed area over acreage of property for them to run and play in.
 

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Watterdog

Did you ask the rescue if they would accept it if you had a dog run, a smaller fenced area for your dog, I understand that you could not fence the whole property.

We live in a more rural setting near us, and you wouldn't believe how many dogs are lost around here. I admire you for trying to adopt.
 

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Very sorry for your loss.



I surprisingly heard of this kind of policy from a breeder friend of mine. She would not place a puppy with someone (she made sure she said including me) who did not have a fenced yard. My dogs are field dogs and get plenty of exercise in training, more than most. If the policy is one to guarantee exercise it is a flawed policy IMO. However when speaking to breeders of field dogs a fenced yard never was part of the inquiry, field dogs get plenty of exercise. I myself told prospective puppy buyers that my puppies needed active households and that is where they went.


Bottom line: I would make sure I told any rescue organization that I planned to do obedience training and give that dog plenty of exercise---walking, hiking, swimming, and play. I would think (but I am not sure) that the policy is meant to prevent a Golden from going into a house where it gets big and fat and bored which leads to problems.


Good luck, I get the feeling if someone will listen you can make a good case for yourself. Please let us know.
 

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Many if not most shelters require fencing before they will allow for adoption although I know there are exceptions made. We keep Oscar, who is from Yankee Golden Retriever Rescue, on a 60 foot long lead for all outside time which allows him to chase crows, squirrels, etc, and play with other dogs. We also take him swimming, which we carefully supervise. He is never off lead. We have no idea what he experienced for the first 3 1/2 years of his life. When he first arrived he was willful and stubborn and when he heard "come" usually took off in the other direction. While there has been tremendous improvement over the last 1 1/2 years there are still situations that without a lead would have completely compromised his safety.

The thought of losing him as a consequence of being off lead is almost too much to bear. While I would absolutely love to have him unencumbered, he does not seem to mind in the least.
 

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I live in a townhouse development where we do not have fences. I have had a dog(s) with me ever since moving in (close to 12 years ago). I find that speaking to someone and/or writing a letter is important. I stress that I've had dogs all my life and how important their safety is to me. I let them know that I'm the person that has words with someone who lets their dog run around without a leash in areas where they could harm another dog or themselves. I let them know what my commitment to the dog is (how many walks a dog, for how long, etc. - rain or shine)and again, that safety is number 1 priority. I welcome them to come and spend time with me to show what we do every day and I even give references from neighbours who know my dogs (not necessarily me) and know how they are taken care of. It doesn't always work but a lot of times it does. I always ask is it important that the dog have a fenced yard (where unfortunately they could be kept captive) or an owner who is committed to safety and to ensuring the dog gets lots of walks a day. Good luck to you.
 
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