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Discussion Starter #1
Hello:
I am hoping someone can help me with this. We are looking for a puppy, and when I was researching the parents on the OFA site I noticed that on the eyes cert both the sire and the sire's father carry D1-Iris, ciliary body cyst. After some reading last night, it seems that this may or may not lead to PU. Thoughts?
What do you all think about getting a puppy from this litter? Is this a big deal or not?
Any advice would be appreciated.
Thanks!
 

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Technically iris cysts do not lead to PU. It just happens that dogs with PU have iris cysts.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for replying. So would you consider getting the puppy?
We lost our first Golden to Bone cancer at 10 years. We loved her so much!
Thanks again for replying.
 

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I would discuss it with the breeder and find out if they have dogs that have developed PU. Technically PU can show up from 4.5 to 14.5 years... and many breeders I have known through the years do not always continue to clear the dogs after they are no longer bred... A friend of mine has a golden with iris cysts, has had them for years, and is 9.5 years and does not have PU. Definitely have a conversation with the breeder...
 
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I find it interesting that other breeders have not responded to this....
 

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Unfortunately we still do not enough about PU. We do not at this time understand the relationship between PU and Iris Cysts, IF (and that is a BIG if) one even exists.
I honestly don't think there is any way to rationally tell someone whether or not it is a big deal. My position is if it concerns you more than the possibility of any other possible thing that can go wrong with a pup, walk away. As with any breeding regardless of how long the health clearances are in a pedigree, there will always with Mother Nature's way of not playing by those rules.
 
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Yes, we do not know enough about PU or the relationship of iris cysts and having a dog with PU. But if there are are breeders out there with dogs with iris cysts, their info would be useful.
 

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Yes, we do not know enough about PU or the relationship of iris cysts and having a dog with PU. But if there are are breeders out there with dogs with iris cysts, their info would be useful.

Okay, what would you like to ask me?
 

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Hank, do your dogs have iris cysts? I wasn't pointing fingers.... because quite frankly, I do not know where I stand on this.
 

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Hank, do your dogs have iris cysts? I wasn't pointing fingers.... because quite frankly, I do not know where I stand on this.

No, I do not think you are pointing fingers, just don't know what I can tell you. My daughter's boy out of Lucy was diagnosed with iris cysts a year and a half ago. He is intact and collected. Would love to use him and likely will unless something is discovered to make me change my mind.
 
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My experience is that more dogs with cysts are fine vs the issue wih PU.
 

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My experience is that more dogs with cysts are fine vs the issue wih PU.

Definitely mine also. But it would still be really nice to know.
 

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Well the bottom line is it totally sucks, and when will it be the right amount of time to know?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hi Sally and Hank: Thank you so much for your comments. This is a good article found on Golden Retriever of America.

Pigmentary Uveitis Study


Findings from a research study published late last year (Esson D et al, 2009) have raised questions about the underlying nature of pigmentary uveitis (PU). This disease previously had been believed to include inflammation as a consistent feature, and indeed, even the suffix “itis” in the name refers to inflammation. This new study closely examined the enucleated (surgically removed) eyes from dogs with advanced disease, and found minimal to moderate inflammation in eight eyes, but no evidence of cellular inflammation in the remaining seven. However, three features present in all of the eyes were cysts; abnormal pigment; and changes in the structure that drains fluid from inside the eye (which in turn frequently lead to the development of glaucoma, as it did in these eyes). Because of the consistent presence of cysts, pigment, and structural changes that often result in glaucoma – and the inconsistent presence of inflammation – the study authors suggested renaming the disease “Pigmentary and Cystic Glaucoma of Golden Retrievers.”
This research reinforces an important message for breeders: do not take this disease lightly! This new information should help to remind breeders that pigmentary uveitis is not yet well understood, and among the questions that are not fully answered is exactly what role inflammation plays. Affected dogs are often treated with anti-inflammatory drugs such as steroids and NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), but despite the best treatment available, the disease frequently progress to glaucoma and blindness. It appears that some breeders have been under the impression that PU is a generally manageable disease that may not progress providing treatment is begun early, but that is clearly not the case. Pigmentary uveitis is a serious disease that usually results in significantly diminished quality of life, and because of that it ranks among the most important heritable diseases in Golden Retrievers.
Another study that GRCA members and other dedicated Golden owners have supported by providing blood samples from affected dogs was conducted by Dr Wendy Townsend, previously at Michigan State University and now at Purdue. As confirmed in the above study, there has been a long-known association between PU and iris cysts, and Dr Townsend’s work also strengthened that association. The question has been raised as to whether a finding of iris cysts alone may represent a mild form of PU in some dogs. Since other breeds also get iris cysts, this would not apply to all Goldens with iris cysts, and at this time there is no way to determine in which dogs the cysts are associated with PU. Dr Townsend is continuing to investigate this, but the warning to breeders is to be very cautious about breeding a dog with iris cysts, even though he/she may have a CERF number. Goldens with iris cysts should be followed every six months by an ophthalmologist, and suspicions should be heightened if the dog is closely related to a Golden with PU.
Some very good news for the breed is that Dr Townsend is also beginning work to identify the gene responsible for PU, so that a DNA test can be developed. She continues to need blood samples and pedigrees from affected dogs and their close relatives. Although it would be a very unfortunate accidental breeding, she most needs samples from families in which both parents have been subsequently diagnosed with PU. While many breeders do not talk openly about this disease, the scary reality is that the breed incidence of PU now appears to be high enough that some of these accidental breedings are in fact occurring.
A number of careful and highly respected breeding programs have been hit extremely hard by pigmentary uveitis, and with an often very late age of onset, literally all lines are at risk. Anyone who thinks they are safe in this regard is simply mistaken. But while no one asks for this, many breeders are still not responding appropriately to this threat to our breed. Over recent years the Health & Genetics Committee has strongly urged that breeders continue to do eye exams and to CERF those results for the lifetime of any dog that has been bred. Yet some owners still do not submit eye examination results for CERF certification, while many dogs that were previously CERF’d simply disappear from current CERF status after a period of time. These practices leave the breed extremely vulnerable to late onset eye disease because breeders cannot make good decisions about diseases like pigmentary uveitis without access to large amounts of data that span dogs’ lifetimes. This cannot be accomplished by circulating copies of eye exams from person to person, and only public databases can provide permanent and broad access to information that current breeders need and future generations will depend on. It cannot be overemphasized that lifelong CERFing is a breeder’s ethical duty, and it’s time for everyone to step up and do the right thing.

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kimmysq

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Thank you so much for your informative post, it really opened my eyes!!!!
Here is another article I found on Golden Retriever Club of America.

Pigmentary Uveitis Study


Findings from a research study published late last year (Esson D et al, 2009) have raised questions about the underlying nature of pigmentary uveitis (PU). This disease previously had been believed to include inflammation as a consistent feature, and indeed, even the suffix “itis” in the name refers to inflammation. This new study closely examined the enucleated (surgically removed) eyes from dogs with advanced disease, and found minimal to moderate inflammation in eight eyes, but no evidence of cellular inflammation in the remaining seven. However, three features present in all of the eyes were cysts; abnormal pigment; and changes in the structure that drains fluid from inside the eye (which in turn frequently lead to the development of glaucoma, as it did in these eyes). Because of the consistent presence of cysts, pigment, and structural changes that often result in glaucoma – and the inconsistent presence of inflammation – the study authors suggested renaming the disease “Pigmentary and Cystic Glaucoma of Golden Retrievers.”
This research reinforces an important message for breeders: do not take this disease lightly! This new information should help to remind breeders that pigmentary uveitis is not yet well understood, and among the questions that are not fully answered is exactly what role inflammation plays. Affected dogs are often treated with anti-inflammatory drugs such as steroids and NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), but despite the best treatment available, the disease frequently progress to glaucoma and blindness. It appears that some breeders have been under the impression that PU is a generally manageable disease that may not progress providing treatment is begun early, but that is clearly not the case. Pigmentary uveitis is a serious disease that usually results in significantly diminished quality of life, and because of that it ranks among the most important heritable diseases in Golden Retrievers.
Another study that GRCA members and other dedicated Golden owners have supported by providing blood samples from affected dogs was conducted by Dr Wendy Townsend, previously at Michigan State University and now at Purdue. As confirmed in the above study, there has been a long-known association between PU and iris cysts, and Dr Townsend’s work also strengthened that association. The question has been raised as to whether a finding of iris cysts alone may represent a mild form of PU in some dogs. Since other breeds also get iris cysts, this would not apply to all Goldens with iris cysts, and at this time there is no way to determine in which dogs the cysts are associated with PU. Dr Townsend is continuing to investigate this, but the warning to breeders is to be very cautious about breeding a dog with iris cysts, even though he/she may have a CERF number. Goldens with iris cysts should be followed every six months by an ophthalmologist, and suspicions should be heightened if the dog is closely related to a Golden with PU.
Some very good news for the breed is that Dr Townsend is also beginning work to identify the gene responsible for PU, so that a DNA test can be developed. She continues to need blood samples and pedigrees from affected dogs and their close relatives. Although it would be a very unfortunate accidental breeding, she most needs samples from families in which both parents have been subsequently diagnosed with PU. While many breeders do not talk openly about this disease, the scary reality is that the breed incidence of PU now appears to be high enough that some of these accidental breedings are in fact occurring.
A number of careful and highly respected breeding programs have been hit extremely hard by pigmentary uveitis, and with an often very late age of onset, literally all lines are at risk. Anyone who thinks they are safe in this regard is simply mistaken. But while no one asks for this, many breeders are still not responding appropriately to this threat to our breed. Over recent years the Health & Genetics Committee has strongly urged that breeders continue to do eye exams and to CERF those results for the lifetime of any dog that has been bred. Yet some owners still do not submit eye examination results for CERF certification, while many dogs that were previously CERF’d simply disappear from current CERF status after a period of time. These practices leave the breed extremely vulnerable to late onset eye disease because breeders cannot make good decisions about diseases like pigmentary uveitis without access to large amounts of data that span dogs’ lifetimes. This cannot be accomplished by circulating copies of eye exams from person to person, and only public databases can provide permanent and broad access to information that current breeders need and future generations will depend on. It cannot be overemphasized that lifelong CERFing is a breeder’s ethical duty, and it’s time for everyone to step up and do the right thing.
 
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