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Hi there! This is my up and coming female and I was hoping to get some experienced show people point out her flaws(other than her pale color of course). This is all just for fun, and thought it would be interesting to see what others think. In my opinion, her body is longer than the standard calls for but I’m still learning as others continue to do as well:) She is 21.5 inches at the whithers and is a solid 58 pounds after her checkup at the vet if this helps at all.
Dog Carnivore Grass Fawn Companion dog
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
She’s 3. Never got to showing her until now as we adopted 3 kiddos right before covid and then.. COVID hit haha. We are showing her for fun and to hopefully get a litter from her eventually:)
She’s 3. Never got to showing her until now as we adopted 3 kiddos right before covid and then.. COVID hit haha. We are showing her for fun and to hopefully get a litter from her eventually:)
We believe in proving them somehow before… whether being a service dog or a show dog(new thing to us). She is a PTSD service dog for my husband that served in the army and his doctors think it would be good for the both of them to become partners in the ring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
We believe in proving them somehow before breeding… with her being a service dog and hopefully a show dog(new thing to us). She is a PTSD service dog for my husband that served in the army and his doctors think it would be good for the both of them to become partners in the ring.
 

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Pretty nice looking dog! I would look into doing a CCA with her. No training required. Best of luck.
 

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She’s a lovely dog! I’m definitely not an expert but agree that she looks a little long In body for the ideal breed standard, but hopefully someone with WAY more experience than I have will chime in. 😉

I think it would be fun to at least see if she can get a CCA (certificate of conformation assessment) but keep in mind there’s all sorts of activities you or your husband can participate in (most of which are far easier to succeed/title in than conformation). Agility, Obedience, Rally, field work, nose work, dock diving, therapy work, FASTCat, are all options to consider.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
She’s a lovely dog! I’m definitely not an expert but agree that she looks a little long In body for the ideal breed standard, but hopefully someone with WAY more experience than I have will chime in. 😉

I think it would be fun to at least see if she can get a CCA (certificate of conformation assessment) but keep in mind there’s all sorts of activities you or your husband can participate in (most of which are far easier to succeed/title in than conformation). Agility, Obedience, Rally, field work, nose work, dock diving, therapy work, FASTCat, are all options to consider.
The funny thing is that she is LOVES to be shown when we do little “at home” rings for fun. We have tried agility and nose work and dock diving but she hated it with all of her sweet existence😂 haven’t looked into the others. I’m not sure how to go about doing CCA… we are in Alaska and haven’t found anything about one happening… then again I’m a novice.
 

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You would need to check with the Midnight Sun Golden Retriever Club I think. I know Alaska is huge, but they are the only club I know of off the top of my head. There are usually 1 or 2 big shows in Alaska every year in the summer where a CCA might possibly be held in conjunction with the show.
 

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She’s a pretty girl!! If you’re able to get a level photo of her standing square I’d love to see.
 

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So...I'm probably always the first to refuse to comment on a bad stack or bad photo/angle. And I'll say that's why I wouldn't comment on the face/expression/head photo - because it really doesn't show what we'd normally want to see with a head shot. The lighting and angle is funky. I guess as example, it appears she has good pigment (nose and eye rims), but her mouth does not appear to be as tight as preferred with this breed. And the angle of her head in the pic doesn't allow for a fair consideration of her muzze/head/headpiece.

Stacked picture is not as bad as some that I've seen. She definitely is long in body. And then there is something going on in her croup/tailset. It's either too straight a croup or a high tailset. Head/front appear nice in the first pic.

Now if she's 3 years old and doesn't like jumping in agility or dock jumping... get her hips and elbows checked/OFA cleared before you do anything. Assuming they have not yet been checked?

Try conformation and see if you enjoy it. ;) Hate to burst anyone's bubbles, but while I've been showing for 8 years.... I've seen a lot of people starting up.... and disappearing after 1-5 shows.

Conformation looks like an easy sport outside the ring or playing around at home. It does get tough when you enter the ring for a variety of reasons. And then you get people quitting because... their dog doesn't enjoy the sport.

If you are planning to breed the dog - my opinion is you should be able to take your dog into the show ring and show her. Among else, being able to show your dog shows that you have a dog who meets breed standard. It also teaches people what should be there - that's assuming they haven't gone all sour grapes while thinking their dogs have it and "the ref is blind". :)

As well - I gotta add that conformation shows are such that typically you have to have a nice dog - temperament wise. I showed my guys today and every single boy dog there was getting their nose dabbed with vicks because there were a lot of girlies in season and the boys were losing their minds. LOL. And this was close quarters so any quarrelsome tendencies - would have been difficult to keep under wraps.

The only other thing is bigger emphasis that before you start conformation or other sports to prove a dog mental and physically meets the breed standard and is something special.... please make sure your dog gets full clearances.

Um... there was a moment where my youngest was completely sprawled out on the grass outside the ring today - full frog position and not caring a bit who or what was walking around him or stepping over. <= One lady with a spinone stopped and commented that was a very comfortable dog.... and good hips. And I smiled and told her, "Yep, you betcha. Wouldn't be here if they weren't." As much fun as conformation is.... it's quite expensive proving a dog who cannot be bred because of failed hips or elbows.

Talking to other people around my setup - there were more than a few who typically plop down $500-1500 on hotel accommodations for big shows (3-5 days). That's a lot to spend on a hobby you are doing just for fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
So...I'm probably always the first to refuse to comment on a bad stack or bad photo/angle. And I'll say that's why I wouldn't comment on the face/expression/head photo - because it really doesn't show what we'd normally want to see with a head shot. The lighting and angle is funky. I guess as example, it appears she has good pigment (nose and eye rims), but her mouth does not appear to be as tight as preferred with this breed. And the angle of her head in the pic doesn't allow for a fair consideration of her muzze/head/headpiece.

Stacked picture is not as bad as some that I've seen. She definitely is long in body. And then there is something going on in her croup/tailset. It's either too straight a croup or a high tailset. Head/front appear nice in the first pic.

Now if she's 3 years old and doesn't like jumping in agility or dock jumping... get her hips and elbows checked/OFA cleared before you do anything. Assuming they have not yet been checked?

Try conformation and see if you enjoy it. ;) Hate to burst anyone's bubbles, but while I've been showing for 8 years.... I've seen a lot of people starting up.... and disappearing after 1-5 shows.

Conformation looks like an easy sport outside the ring or playing around at home. It does get tough when you enter the ring for a variety of reasons. And then you get people quitting because... their dog doesn't enjoy the sport.

If you are planning to breed the dog - my opinion is you should be able to take your dog into the show ring and show her. Among else, being able to show your dog shows that you have a dog who meets breed standard. It also teaches people what should be there - that's assuming they haven't gone all sour grapes while thinking their dogs have it and "the ref is blind". :)

As well - I gotta add that conformation shows are such that typically you have to have a nice dog - temperament wise. I showed my guys today and every single boy dog there was getting their nose dabbed with vicks because there were a lot of girlies in season and the boys were losing their minds. LOL. And this was close quarters so any quarrelsome tendencies - would have been difficult to keep under wraps.

The only other thing is bigger emphasis that before you start conformation or other sports to prove a dog mental and physically meets the breed standard and is something special.... please make sure your dog gets full clearances.

Um... there was a moment where my youngest was completely sprawled out on the grass outside the ring today - full frog position and not caring a bit who or what was walking around him or stepping over. <= One lady with a spinone stopped and commented that was a very comfortable dog.... and good hips. And I smiled and told her, "Yep, you betcha. Wouldn't be here if they weren't." As much fun as conformation is.... it's quite expensive proving a dog who cannot be bred because of failed hips or elbows.

Talking to other people around my setup - there were more than a few who typically plop down $500-1500 on hotel accommodations for big shows (3-5 days). That's a lot to spend on a hobby you are doing just for fun.
I. An assure you she just doesn’t like it because she is trained not to be distracted from my husband. She LOVES the water and to play rough. But only on her terms lol. Also, she sits in frog position all day long lol. I’ll find a funny picture. And yes her tail and croup do look a bit funky now that I look at that photo. I’ll try and get a better picture of her soon. We have a bad windstorm coming through that inhibited me. As for her muzzle. She got her mamas and it isn’t very tight. She has verrrryyyy dark pigment and has shades of light gold in her creamy coat. It’s so pretty! Thank you for responding! I really appreciate it!
 

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I. An assure you she just doesn’t like it because she is trained not to be distracted from my husband. She LOVES the water and to play rough. But only on her terms lol. Also, she sits in frog position all day long lol. I’ll find a funny picture. And yes her tail and croup do look a bit funky now that I look at that photo. I’ll try and get a better picture of her soon. We have a bad windstorm coming through that inhibited me. As for her muzzle. She got her mamas and it isn’t very tight. She has verrrryyyy dark pigment and has shades of light gold in her creamy coat. It’s so pretty! Thank you for responding! I really appreciate it!
She still would need full OFA clearances (hips, elbows, heart, eyes) and genetic testing at the bare minimum before before you even considering breeding her. You also would want to prove her in some way. I prefer breeders who prove in both conformation and performance. Unfortunately, a lot of people just say "my dog is healthy, my dog is breed standard, my dog has a great temperment, etc." without putting in the time and money to prove it. Not every dog is meant to or should be bred as well. Responsible breeders work to preserve our beloved breeds and work diligently to produce puppies with incredible health, temperament, and structure. I don't know how well she would do in the AKC ring, but you won't know until you try. I'd be interested to see some better photos of her.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
She still would need full OFA clearances (hips, elbows, heart, eyes) and genetic testing at the bare minimum before before you even considering breeding her. You also would want to prove her in some way. I prefer breeders who prove in both conformation and performance. Unfortunately, a lot of people just say "my dog is healthy, my dog is breed standard, my dog has a great temperment, etc." without putting in the time and money to prove it. Not every dog is meant to or should be bred as well. Responsible breeders work to preserve our beloved breeds and work diligently to produce puppies with incredible health, temperament, and structure. I don't know how well she would do in the AKC ring, but you won't know until you try. I'd be interested to see some better photos of her.
That’s not what I meant at all! We would do all of the testing before considering breeding her. I just was saying that I know that she doesn’t have it based on those things alone. However that alone isn’t enough to breed her. We plan on doing Pennhip for hips and then OFAs for the other testing. She already has genetic testing as we were curious of what her results might be with Ich. As for performance, she isn’t a big retriever lol and havent had enough time to train her in agility(7 kids 4 being special needs) Possibly in obedience though, as she has had enough training for that:) I was looking into UKC and IABCA as well for conformation. Though I hear they aren’t “respected” as much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
You would need to check with the Midnight Sun Golden Retriever Club I think. I know Alaska is huge, but they are the only club I know of off the top of my head. There are usually 1 or 2 big shows in Alaska every year in the summer where a CCA might possibly be held in conjunction with the show.
Thank you! We actually went to one in July(to get her eyes and heart checked) sadly there wasn’t anymore spots:( It was soooo fun to see all the dogs happily showing their stuff! I didn’t see anything about a CCA sadly:(
 

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Kate
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We plan on doing Pennhip for hips and then OFAs for the other testing.
Why not just do OFA's - hips and elbows? Get it done. One stop, all done, out of your hair - posted publicly on OFA.

Also - if she's 3, then she should have 3 years worth of eye clearances.

As well, heart clearance from cardiologist.

The advantage of using OFA is when you are making puppies in the next year or so (age 3, she's not getting any younger), when buyers ask about clearances - you just email a link to her OFA page. It's all there. And it will make you look good for getting it done prior to breeding.

OFA is great for posting publicly not just the hips/elbows - but everything else, including the DNA stuff.

It is worth getting it done. Especially as it seems you are eager to start spending money and getting started with her.
 

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Why not just do OFA's - hips and elbows? Get it done. One stop, all done, out of your hair - posted publicly on OFA.

Also - if she's 3, then she should have 3 years worth of eye clearances.

As well, heart clearance from cardiologist.

The advantage of using OFA is when you are making puppies in the next year or so (age 3, she's not getting any younger), when buyers ask about clearances - you just email a link to her OFA page. It's all there. And it will make you look good for getting it done prior to breeding.

OFA is great for posting publicly not just the hips/elbows - but everything else, including the DNA stuff.

It is worth getting it done. Especially as it seems you are eager to start spending money and getting started with her.
And if PH is your thing, one of the views is also the OFA view- it'd cost you an additional $10 or so to add hips to the elbows, since PH doesn't do elbows. Do both if you must do PH.
 
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