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Oh no I feel sorry for you, my pup growled at the vets a few months back&she immediately told me he had behaviour problems-she didnt offer any constructive advice though! I sought the help of a canine behaviourist, I cried my heart out to him hahahaha! I really would consider this route before neutering, it really did wonders for our relationship with our dog some things we didnt even realise we were doing that gave him the wrong message. We have a wonderful family pet:) Good luck with Cody, I hope he works it out:)
 

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Unfortunately, as others have said, neutering the dog will not fix behavioral issues. However, I very highly recommend neutering. It is also a health concern. Goldens have very high cancer rates, and males can be prone to testicular cancer later in life if not neutered. I personally have always neutered my dogs and cats and wouldn't have it any other way.

I also do not think that this was aggression; however, that does not make it acceptable behavior. I think that crating during mealtimes is a very smart move. I would also recommend getting into some training classes somewhere.
 

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From your posts, it almost sounds like you're afraid of Cody. Is he rambunctious with the kids? How old are the kids? I often say that dogs and small children are not a good mix - and I usually get yelled at for saying that, but this is a perfect example of why I say that.
I had Max neutered at 6 months - it made very little difference in his behavior.
 

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I had Max neutered at 6 months - it made very little difference in his behavior.
What it likely DID do, though, was prevent the "supercharge" effect of the hormonal influence. Hormones start flowing around 8 months.
 

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What it likely DID do, though, was prevent the "supercharge" effect of the hormonal influence. Hormones start flowing around 8 months.
I didn't know that! Is that why 6 months is so highly recommended?
(He can be a monster at times, but for the most part he's very calm, so I just figured he couldn't get much more mellow.)
 

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While it may help a bit, neutering him will not be a magic quick fix for something like this. Food/resource guarding is something that needs to be dealt with by a trainer or you and your whole family must be really dedicated to fixing this. He may just be a dog that can't eat around his family, or be around you when you eat, especially your children. I agree with crating him during meal time, definitely.
 

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Like you I've got small kids...we started out crating Sherm during meals and now he's "graduated" to a down/stay or climb (staying in his bed) while we eat. Although if we have a lot of company or something, I just crate him. It's just easier and prevents the opportunity for negative behavior. My seven year old son regularly feeds him and does a sit/wait command before Sherm is allowed to eat. We started out w/me holding the leash for that, but now he follows my son's command beautifully whether I'm there or not.

You're at a tough age right now w/him. Sherman is nine months and other than his self-control around other dogs (he just wants to play so badly that he totally forgets all manners/training--he's learning though)--he's really the perfect family dog. I would not have said that a few months ago though...

Hang in there. And crate him for meals/snacks. Then you remove the opportunity for him to misbehave.
 

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I think you have had some excellent advice already on this thread. I would like to say however, that I had an entire dog around smallish children, and had another baby while he was still young. We were very inexperienced in dog ownership, but we must have done something right because he was never a problem around food. Dogs all need to be taught good manners around food especially if children are in the home, as they naturally see kids as below them or equal to them in the 'pack'.

- As has been said before, always feed the dog AFTER you eat, he may have a few left-overs put into his bowl, not eaten from plates.
- NEVER give tidbits from things you are eating, the dog may have some left-overs after you have eaten.
- Keep him away from the table or eating area when the family are eating. If you have a table, insist that the children especially are sitting at it when they eat, that way tasty morsels won't be wafting past the dog's nose encouraging him to steal - unfortunately its doggy nature! (This won't need to be a permanent thing, but probably good practice while this is a problem)

I really don't think that castration will 'cure' this problem, but training and being diligent with your children and dog around food will.

I'm so sorry this has happened but better now while you were there and recognising what was happening. I truly hope you are able to work on this so that it never happens again.

This incident doesn't make your dog bad, he is completley normal, he just needs to be shown what is good behaviour - this is not!
 

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Thank you all..this forum is such a great resource for new dog owners. I am having the same issue with puppy versus kid. My puppy growled and nipped at my son which made me very very upset (all over a dog treat - food)...from this thread I have learned a few things that I could / should be doing..for example feeding the dog last!!! I am glad that I joined...thanks.
 

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Quote:

Any sort of negative behaviour towards my children is not allowed. I have never allowed it from day one and he knows this.
I have noticed he is getting very brave with his attitude in the last week or so. I assume this is because of hormones and I honestly don't know if I am experienced enough to deal with the hormones and behaviour problems. I can deal with the behavior problems but when you add the hormones on top of it I might be out of my league.

I think you've gotten a lot of very good advice. I bolded the part above because while Cody might know this, he doesn't BELIEVE this and feels quite comfortable pushing you around. More obedience training even if he already knows the drill. Some time spent training each day helps reinforce his submissive place in the pack. Have your children participate in the training. Remind him everyday that he's just a dog, even though you love him with all your heart.

I'm also a believer in preventing the mistake rather than correcting the mistake. I think prevention makes a much stronger impression on them than a correction does. Crate or mat training will prevent the mistake and reinforce human authority.

BTW, I haven't had a male dog but have dealt with young stallions. Couldn't WAIT to neuter them!
 

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I totally agree with the down stay at any sign of agression and the NILF method to reinforce your pack leadership. It really does work and is non physical with the dog which is positive. I hope it all goes well for you.
 
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