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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all!
We just brought our puppy home from a breeder and as it turns out he has both coccidia and roundworm. We're wondering if this is common. Thank you in advance for any advice.
-J
 

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Hello all!
We just brought our puppy home from a breeder and as it turns out he has both coccidia and roundworm. We're wondering if this is common. Thank you in advance for any advice.
-J
Roundworm isn’t uncommon, but coccidia not so much. Depending on the state you’re in, breeder’s vet should’ve done fecals and marked the result on the health certificate.
 

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Roundworm pretty common. Coccidia in FL cannot get health certificate til treated and clear.
 

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There is no such thing as an “approved” AKC breeder, it’s just a registry. How many times were the pups wormed when with the breeder and with what? Did the pups have a vet health check to include a fecal?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There is no such thing as an “approved” AKC breeder, it’s just a registry. How many times were the pups wormed when with the breeder and with what? Did the pups have a vet health check to include a fecal?
The puppy came home at 8 weeks with the first round of vaccinations but no fecal. The breeder said we would need to bring a sample to our vet at his first check up there.
 

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Both are fairly common, coccidia especially can “hide” in a puppy until they are stressed. However, the puppy should have had at least one fecal test before leaving the breeder and been appropriately treated. Coccidia doesn’t always show up in a fecal, so many breeders will treat anyway but it is very good at hiding.

I always deworm my puppies and note the results for the new owners, plus do at least two fecals on the litter before they go home.

Recently, roundworms have seemed resistant to the “go to” wormer I like for young puppies so I have switched up my worming protocol.
 

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So, interestingly, New York doesn’t require health certificates to sell a puppy. If breeder did their due diligence, at Tahnee said above, puppy should have been treated several times before going home.

Here in Florida, nearly every susceptible animal has roundworms. It just is the way it is. The parasites, in a healthy adult animal are pretty negligent. Coccidia can be tricker to deal with.
 

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The puppy came home at 8 weeks with the first round of vaccinations but no fecal. The breeder said we would need to bring a sample to our vet at his first check up there.
So, just for your own knowledge- the VMA recommends ALL puppies and mamas be dewormed @ 2.4.6.8.12 and 16 weeks. I too have found pyrantel pamoate doesn't catch it all so like Tagrenine have switched up my protocol, and instead of using PP for the first 4, and fenbendazole for the next two, I'm now doing PP for the 2 week, fenbendazole for the 4 week and PP for the 6 week, then my vet uses fenbendazole for the 8 week when I get shots/health cert. I've never had a positive fecal on any of my dogs, but because of the way roundworms infect puppies (they encyst in the dam's tissue during the dam's puppyhood and cross over when the hormones tell them there are puppies on board- wake up! where they then reside in the lungs of the fetuses til birth) it does not surprise me even after multiple generations of appropriate deworming to see a roundworm every now and then at the 4 week deworm. They're gross ! But are admirable in their strategy for survival. ..
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank you so much for your responses. one more qu
So, interestingly, New York doesn’t require health certificates to sell a puppy. If breeder did their due diligence, at Tahnee said above, puppy should have been treated several times before going home.

Here in Florida, nearly every susceptible animal has roundworms. It just is the way it is. The parasites, in a healthy adult animal are pretty negligent. Coccidia can be tricker to deal with.
We're talking to the vet on Monday but I was wondering if you could clarify how Coccidia could be trickier to deal with? This is all so new and I really do appreciate anything you could share.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So, just for your own knowledge- the VMA recommends ALL puppies and mamas be dewormed @ 2.4.6.8.12 and 16 weeks. I too have found pyrantel pamoate doesn't catch it all so like Tagrenine have switched up my protocol, and instead of using PP for the first 4, and fenbendazole for the next two, I'm now doing PP for the 2 week, fenbendazole for the 4 week and PP for the 6 week, then my vet uses fenbendazole for the 8 week when I get shots/health cert. I've never had a positive fecal on any of my dogs, but because of the way roundworms infect puppies (they encyst in the dam's tissue during the dam's puppyhood and cross over when the hormones tell them there are puppies on board- wake up! where they then reside in the lungs of the fetuses til birth) it does not surprise me even after multiple generations of appropriate deworming to see a roundworm every now and then at the 4 week deworm. They're gross ! But are admirable in their strategy for survival. ..
Thank you.
 

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Coccidia is harder to deal with because the only really approved med for it is not a coccidicide but a drug that alters the reproduction of the cocci. So that keeps it from being a reliable and quick remover of cocci.
There ARE drugs for horses that are coccidicides, some vets will use them on dogs and some will not.
Ponazuril for instance- in shelter medicine, it is used all the time on dogs. It will kill cocci.
 

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Yeah like Prism said, it can be a long, boring process, especially if the environment is the source of contamination.
 

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Coccidia is tricky to deal with for a couple of reasons. The explosive diarrhea is no fun. And often their little colon gets a bit inflamed, so get used to seeing some drops of blood (but don't worry, because it is completely normal). It often takes a long course of treatment, and the pup will FINALLY be over it, only to have it rear its head again a few weeks later. You have to be careful to clean their rear ends when they start shedding the parasite, wiping downwards to make sure they don't just keep getting reinfected. And you have to watch for dehydration in a very young puppy having a lot of liquid diarrhea. Once the pup is finally clear of it, a 30 day term of probiotics can be really helpful for rebalancing the gut, as is a prescription dog food that is bland and easy to digest (I would start the bland vet diet right from day one during treatment and then for many weeks after).
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Coccidia is tricky to deal with for a couple of reasons. The explosive diarrhea is no fun. And often their little colon gets a bit inflamed, so get used to seeing some drops of blood (but don't worry, because it is completely normal). It often takes a long course of treatment, and the pup will FINALLY be over it, only to have it rear its head again a few weeks later. You have to be careful to clean their rear ends when they start shedding the parasite, wiping downwards to make sure they don't just keep getting reinfected. And you have to watch for dehydration in a very young puppy having a lot of liquid diarrhea. Once the pup is finally clear of it, a 30 day term of probiotics can be really helpful for rebalancing the gut, as is a prescription dog food that is bland and easy to digest (I would start the bland vet diet right from day one during treatment and then for many weeks after).
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Apologies for the delay in responding but thank you so much for your help. We did speak to the vet on Monday and we are heeding your advice regarding wiping his butt and the probiotics. Do you see any reason not to start him on probiotics immediately? Our vet seemed to think it is a good idea.
 

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My vet's advice has always been to finish the antibiotic before starting the probiotic because they can cancel each other out. I just always wait.
 

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Apologies for the delay in responding but thank you so much for your help. We did speak to the vet on Monday and we are heeding your advice regarding wiping his butt and the probiotics. Do you see any reason not to start him on probiotics immediately? Our vet seemed to think it is a good idea.
If you do start him on the probiotics, give them at least 2 hours after the antibiotics because the antibiotics will kill the good bacteria seeded by the probiotics.
 
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