Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Tess and Liza
Joined
·
6,075 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yesterday I bought Cesar Millan's newest book on raising a puppy and have read about half of it, so more questions may be forthcoming. He states that when you bring a puppy home, the best thing is to have it stay in a rather confined area (of course not in the garage or so but not giving the pup the entire space of your first floor (and further). Then, after a few days of so, give it a bit more space until after a few weeks you have introduced the puppy to the entire house. If I understand him correctly, it's important that you as 'boss' allow the pup to expand the territory, instead of letting the pup roam around from the beginning on its own and explore. I'm a bit confused about this. I thought that it would be nice for my pup to follow me around if she wanted, instead of being confined to an area in the kitchen where she can hear me moving around ( we having a real open floorplan) but not be able to actually come to me. I like a lot of his ideas, but this is a bit confusing.
 

·
Misty & Holly's Mom :)
Joined
·
8,164 Posts
What is the name of his newest book? my daughter is getting a new puppy tomorrow...
 

·
Humankind. Be both.
Joined
·
7,650 Posts
Oh good grief. Now "the boss" is dictating where the puppy goes b/c that's what "the boss" does?!? I'm sorry, but is there any end to the dominance-based, "be the boss" mumbo jumbo? GAHHHH!

What about keeping the puppy confined b/c it's helpful with housetraining? And a pup wandering around the house at-will is more likely to pee on the floor?!?

Forgive my semi-sarcastic rant... I'm just SOOOOO tired of each and every little NORMAL PUPPY BEHAVIOR being somehow attributed to a dominant/subordinate relationship.

Confined spaces are helpful for A. housetraining and B. management. It's simply helping set your puppy up for success - especially when you can't be there to directly supervise him. If you're keeping him under direct supervision (which isn't letting him wander aimlessly around the house unless you're following him) I don't see any reason why he can't explore his new home. And if it's a pain in the butt for you to follow him around, then use confinement to make your job easier. I just don't think that has ANYTHING to do with being "the boss."

Congrats on getting a puppy, btw! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,278 Posts
Cesar is a pretty controversial figure in the dog world. Without getting into it too much, I'll just say that many people believe his theories are out dated, unscientific and way too harsh.

However, restricting your puppy's space is a very good idea for potty training purposes. It's not necessary if you are watching the pup like a hawk, but if you cannot give the new puppy 100% of your attention, it's best to have a crate or puppy proof small area for him/her. The pup is less likely to soil a small space (think den) than a larger area.
 

·
Humankind. Be both.
Joined
·
7,650 Posts
As an add on... rather than think of the relationship as being "the boss"... what about this idea:

My dogs do what I want b/c they're greedy and I have all their stuff! (Quote credit to trainer, the late Patty Ruzzo.) They learn that keeping me happy = the key to getting what they want. Dogs do what works.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,595 Posts
Oh good grief. Now "the boss" is dictating where the puppy goes b/c that's what "the boss" does?!? I'm sorry, but is there any end to the dominance-based, "be the boss" mumbo jumbo? GAHHHH!

What about keeping the puppy confined b/c it's helpful with housetraining? And a pup wandering around the house at-will is more likely to pee on the floor?!?

Forgive my semi-sarcastic rant... I'm just SOOOOO tired of each and every little NORMAL PUPPY BEHAVIOR being somehow attributed to a dominant/subordinate relationship.

Confined spaces are helpful for A. housetraining and B. management. It's simply helping set your puppy up for success - especially when you can't be there to directly supervise him. If you're keeping him under direct supervision (which isn't letting him wander aimlessly around the house unless you're following him) I don't see any reason why he can't explore his new home. And if it's a pain in the butt for you to follow him around, then use confinement to make your job easier. I just don't think that has ANYTHING to do with being "the boss."

Congrats on getting a puppy, btw! :)
Bravo Steph.
 

·
Tess and Liza
Joined
·
6,075 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I just want to read/know a lot about raising my puppy before she actually comes home...I feel very comfortable with the way things are explained on the forum, but I thought that he has quite a name. I want to do it right...
 

·
Humankind. Be both.
Joined
·
7,650 Posts
I just want to read/know a lot about raising my puppy before she actually comes home...I feel very comfortable with the way things are explained on the forum, but I thought that he has quite a name. I want to do it right...
I'm sorry... I don't mean to sound as though I'm criticizing your search for info! You're doing your homework, which is FANTASTIC!

The CM platform bothers me personally b/c it's so tied into the idea that everything is about dominance/submission. Sometimes it's WAY simpler than that! For example -- a dog walks in front of the owner b/c he's trying to assert his dominance. Really? How exactly? What about the idea that A. a dog has 4 legs and naturally walks faster... or B. the dog just wasn't TAUGHT to walk at heel?

I applaud your effort to do your research! Keep it up! I'd suggest also reading a book or two by people like Patricia McConnell, Pat Miller or Ian Dunbar to get the "other side" of the training story. Educate yourself on both and see what feels most comfortable.
 
Joined
·
677 Posts
He certainly does have quite a name! I will speak no more of this.
There are other good books by people not necessarily on TV--Ian Dunbar, for example, that have great advice for before the puppy comes home and after. Much of Ian Dunbar's writing is available online. I also like a lot of the Monks of New Skete, especially keeping the dog with you at night. They have changed some of their more dominance related training suggestions in their newest edition (The Art of Raising a Puppy.) Golden puppies need a softer approach (I believe) than some of the breeds Milan works with. Good luck with your new puppie...enjoy, have fun and lots of love!
 

·
Tess and Liza
Joined
·
6,075 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
:) Don't worry, I'm not easily intimidated:p:. I also got a really nice book called "Puppy Possibilities, a Positive approach to a Well-Behaved Family Pet" by Kathleen Goodman. Her ideas are totally different!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,569 Posts
Inge,

I may have handouts from puppy kindergarten given to me by one of the training facilities on Rose and Kathy's list. I'll see if I can get a copy to you and Becca via email.
 

·
Tess and Liza
Joined
·
6,075 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks Kim, that would be great! I actually called the training centre near you today to ask about puppyclasses, but they thought I was a bit early...can you believe it?? She's almost a week old, it's never to soon to think about an education!:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,569 Posts
Thanks Kim, that would be great! I actually called the training centre near you today to ask about puppyclasses, but they thought I was a bit early...can you believe it?? She's almost a week old, it's never to soon to think about an education!:)
You are too funny! You do have to wait until she comes home and then until she gets her vaccinations. ;) I did start working with Shadow before we started puppy kindergarten though. He already knew the basics by the time he got there. I can't remember what I read that gave me the most wonderful hints for training. He aced them by 10 weeks old. He came home at 9 weeks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,537 Posts
I agree, you can never start too early with having fun and training your puppy; then, when you go to obedience class, you can work on the commands with the distractions of the other classmates. I'm also in agreement that you use logic with your pup--if you can't supervise, then it's time for a nap in the crate. It will reduce the number of accidents, and help with toilet training, IMHO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
I think of CM as an option. Research is great, but just take what works for you. I like watching him, but my dogs have always been wherever I was when they were puppies. I know that I was bad because Sully slept on my pillow as a puppy, but my old Basset was pretty grouchy. She also acts like a cat and sleeps on the back of my chair. Scotty has also started it. I say if you pay attention to the puppy take her with you, but if you get distracted, for housebreaking purpose, maybe confine her space.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
508 Posts
He certainly does have quite a name! I will speak no more of this.
There are other good books by people not necessarily on TV--Ian Dunbar, for example, that have great advice for before the puppy comes home and after. Much of Ian Dunbar's writing is available online. I also like a lot of the Monks of New Skete, especially keeping the dog with you at night. They have changed some of their more dominance related training suggestions in their newest edition (The Art of Raising a Puppy.) Golden puppies need a softer approach (I believe) than some of the breeds Milan works with. Good luck with your new puppie...enjoy, have fun and lots of love!
I actually just bought one of CM's books as well and I found this same thing.... Goldens need a softer approach, I actually stopped reading it in the middle because I was having a hard time relating to his style. After having Mitchell (at the Bridge) for almost 14 years I can't imagine having a nasty golden. He was the sweetest love! Maybe on this forum I read about teathering your puppy to you as you go around the house and how this is good for bonding and potty training. I liked this approach and I am seriously considering this with our new puppy. 7 weeks and counting before our boy comes home!!!! Yeah!!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
508 Posts
:) Don't worry, I'm not easily intimidated:p:. I also got a really nice book called "Puppy Possibilities, a Positive approach to a Well-Behaved Family Pet" by Kathleen Goodman. Her ideas are totally different!
I really love this book and can't wait to try her style. This is way more suiting to the golden life.
 

·
Nancy
Joined
·
7,493 Posts
I didn't allow Hank to follow me around the house until he was housebroke. He could squat with such speed that it would have been impossible to make sure he didn't pee everywhere. Now he has run of the first floor (our daughter & granddaughter's rooms are upstairs, too many small things lying around) unless we're not home, then he's confined to the laundry room.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top