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Should a female dog with Distichiasis eyelid problems, as well as both her parents having catarects and eye lid problems be bred? I really want to buy a puppy from a breeder, all the hips, elbows, and heart are normal, but the eyelids on just the female have problems. Will this probably be passed on as a genetic defect?

Thanks!
 

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Should a female dog with Distichiasis eyelid problems, as well as both her parents having catarects and eye lid problems be bred? I really want to buy a puppy from a breeder, all the hips, elbows, and heart are normal, but the eyelids on just the female have problems. Will this probably be passed on as a genetic defect?

Thanks!

I would not breed her.
 

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If the eyelid problem is entropion or ectropion, my experience has been that this is very frequently passed on to the offspring. This requires surgery to correct.

Distichia can be anything from 1 or 2 soft extra eyelashes that cause no problems to stiffer eyelashes that require surgery and are very irritating to the eyes.

If both parents have cataracts, I am very surprised that they were bred. Do you know what type of cataracts they were?

What is the breeder's reasoning for breeding her girl?
 

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My understanding is that the female and both her parents have recent CERF numbers. The parents have cataracts with level of significance unknown, which does qualify them for a number. The female has distichia but no cataracts.

I agree with PG in that even with CERF numbers, I would not have bred the parents of the female together.

If the sire of the litter has a recent CERF number and his parents have recent CERF numbers, and there are no notations regarding cataracts of any type, significance known or unknown, and the sire and his parents are free of distichia, and the female's distichia has not caused any irritation or tearing and has not required surgery, odds are that the puppies will be fine. It is definitely more of a gamble than a puppy from a litter whose parents and grandparents have CERF numbers with no notations.

If any of the above do not have a CERF number, I would not take a puppy.

As a breeder, it concerns me because I look at puppies as potential breeding prospects, and the cataracts bother me greatly.
 

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I agree with the statements already mentioned here. It is one thing to breed a carrier dog or even an affected dog to a clear dog. But to breed together two affected dogs is just bad breeding. Cataracts are bad business. The distichiasis could be insignificant and then again it could be really irritating. It just depends.
 

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If I'm uderstanding correctly, both parents of the puppy you want to buy have cataracts. So if they didn't have their CERF clearances, they should not have been bred. A puppy from them should also not be bred as cataracts can show up when the puppy is older which is why we do the eye exams yearly, and you want to have generations of all the health clearances, among other things, behind a dog you breed.
 

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Not to condone breeding affecteds, but it is also possible that they are late-onset cataracts as opposed to Juvenile Cataracts, esp. with the significance unknown notation from the opthamologist. It is possible that they were bred before the cataracts emerged, if we are talking about the parents of a bitch who is now old enough herself to be having a litter.
 

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If I'm uderstanding correctly, both parents of the puppy you want to buy have cataracts. So if they didn't have their CERF clearances, they should not have been bred. A puppy from them should also not be bred as cataracts can show up when the puppy is older which is why we do the eye exams yearly, and you want to have generations of all the health clearances, among other things, behind a dog you breed.
As I read it, it is the maternal grandparents who have cataracts, with their CERF paperwork noting "level of significance unknown." This does entitle them to a CERF clearance per CERF. And I interpreted it as the dam apparently also has a CERF clearance, but with distichia noted.

The sire of the litter apparently has a CERF clearance with no notations or breeder's options.

I think that it is more than likely that pet pups from the sire and dam will be fine, although they could have some distichia, hence my earlier comments.

However as a breeder, everything else being equal, I don't think I would have bred the dam's parents together, since both have cataracts, even though level of significance is unknown and both have a CERF clearance. And, also as a breeder, I would be hesitant about purchasing a show/breeding prospect from this breeding, due to the cataracts of the maternal grandparents of the litter.

And yes, it is also possible that the maternal grandparent's did not have cataracts at the time of the breeding, nd that they developed later.
 

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let me just add something about distichia....

there is a question about whether many more dogs have distichia than would be indicated by their clearance... the hairs grow.... and then fall out and regrow... there is some thought that if you just hit it right or plan right the opthalmologist would never see the distichia... which makes the clearances very difficult to trust... I know several dogs where the distichia wasn't found until they were 7-9 years old.... very interesting...

they say not to double up on it... which I agree with .... just to add another two cents... I have a girl with one distichia hair in one eye ... I bred her to another dog without a diagnosis of distichia and to date don't have any puppies with distichia.... just interesting about hte distichia

I totally agree with you about the cataracts issue... if you don't know then why take a chance...
s
 
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