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The one and only
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Golden Retriever, Ambar, is one of the greatest dogs I've ever had... but recently I've had some issues with her.

She knows a handful of tricks and answers very well to them at home and some other locations, but when I let her out into the yard, she won't come most of the time.

Since I work from home, she's usually with me, and she is quite spoiled, if maybe a little under-active. However, everyday I take out some time and play with her, take her on a walk or something.

Anyway, getting back on track, when I let her out, she will only come to me when it's feeding time. Outside of that, she just won't listen. She'll run away, around me in a playful manner or just won't come... when I get close, she just runs the other direction... my neighbors are going to think I'm bad because it seems like she doesn't want to come.

I've tried everything: bribing her with food, throwing balls, calling her nicely, calling her strictly-firmly (never hitting her)... etc - This evening I had to resort to almost tackling her and carry her inside and say: "In"

The funny thing is that, as mentioned before, she does superb when inside. She'll obey all commands, go, stay, sit, up, down, lay, jump, paw, no... etc even without communicating verbally (hand gestures)... so I don't know what's going on.

Another interesting aspect is that when she's excited (usually around children, visitors, or just about anyone) it'll take her some time to listen, and as most dogs, will just "hug" them... no matter how many times I say no, etc. I have to tell her very firmly and loud (a pinch below yelling though).

Our relationship? She sleeps under my bed (or will get on it), will come to me often during the day and follows me everywhere inside the house... I just wish she wouldn't ignore me.

Any advice for me to teach Ambar?

 

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shadow friend
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Ah, well, it's an overpowering world out there!!! Full of sights and sounds and smells!! It's much harder to listen outdoors.

I am so proud of my Max as he does pretty great outside now! However, it took a LONG time to get him to this point of recall and it's not perfect. I think perhaps some focus exercises might help you. Like, you know, call your dog and just look at her. When she makes eye contact, give her a treat. Keep giving treats for eye contact. It helps teach her to focus on you and that will only help outdoors. Only other thing I can say is practice practice practice!!! I will tell Max to come a number of times while we are on a leashed walk. When he does, he gets an atta boy and a treat.
Recently, he broke free of my grip while walking on Main Street. I called him and wow, he came to me!! So lots of practice and I think everything will work out!!
 

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How old is Amber?

You need to work on her recall, put her on a long lead and Practice, Practice, Practice. The big outdoor world has so many distractions and smells - a doggie smorgasbord! She sounds very playful and she doesn't know that she has to listen to you outside as well as inside. You need to work your dog in as many locations and on as many surfaces as possible.

Kirby has a very good recall indoors as well as outside - she is also food oriented and she listens to me. Darby on the other hand has a good recall in class but not as good at home. He gets totally overstimulated out side of the house, he is easily distracted and has ADD. The few times he has gotten out of the yard he will not come to me, but I know has weakness. I will grab his favorite ball, sit on the ground and talk to him. It will take awhile but he will come over to me, can resist Mommy's lap for long. When he finally comes I always tell him good boy and reward him for coming. Never scold for running or not listening.

It will take time and work but she sounds like just a typical Golden testing the limits. Good-luck.
 

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The one and only
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies!

She's 10 months old, she's fairly good on the leash and everyone loves her. She loves to follow birds, cats, and everything that moves. She gets praised a lot when in the front yard and people from the neighborhood pass by, perhaps she likes the extra attention. Funny thing is that she focuses on the tv.

I'll try with extra exercise and more treats, maybe changing the location of her training.

Anyway, more pictures:









 

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She's a doll? :D

She is also a puppy and wants to play. Try working her in the yard with the lead on, then removing it to have a play time. When you are playing "every" time she comes to you say "good come" and reward her. Make recall fun and a game and she will get better and better. Click on the lead and work so more - repeat play. Keep the work sessions short 5 - 10 mins. If it's fun they will do it and never realize it's training! ;)
 

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Tracer, Rumor & Cady
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Tracer, Rumor & Cady
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If you call her/bribe her/chase her around and then take her inside...it is only gonna take three times for her to figure out...Come To Mum=My fun is OVER!
Gotta gotta gotta convince her otherwise....
 

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chew chew chew
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Look up 'nothing in life is free' online and you'll get some good information. Sounds like she needs a bit of that in her life! Besides that, I would get a bunch of good treats for her, and 20 times a day, inside and out, call out 'here' in a happy voice, when she comes to you (you may have to start by showing her the food) grab her collar, give her the treat, say 'good here' and then release. You can also do this with someone else, have them hold her while you go to another room and call her, then you hold her while they go to another location. You can make it a game of 'hide and seek' with her so 'here' becomes something positive. If you only ever call her to bring her in the house or put her leash on she's not going to want to come as much. Using a different word retrains her to what 'that' means...

She's cute though! Love the face!

Lana
 

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Knife Swallower
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I spent my first few weeks with Ranger not knowing whether he was smart but stubborn, or just dumb. I did all our training outside in front of the house and after 3 weeks, he still didn't know how to "down". Each time I asked, I eventually "wrestled" him to the ground as he sat there looking at me blankly. SO frustrating especially since the last dog I had trained was a border collie who picked things up the first try!

Finally one night inside the house I was getting his dinner and asked him with exasperation/frustation: "Why can't you just LAY DOWN!!??" Imagine my surprise when he did without hesitation. For some reason, this dog just wouldn't lay down outside. We started doing our obedience inside and in the backyard on leash and by the time we went back out front, his down was impeccable.

Then I had a breakthrough after a session with an animal behaviourist. Ranger went from a dog who's attitude was "make me" to "I'd love to!". Since then, Ranger really really WANTS to please whereas before he didn't care. Not saying that's the problem with your dog but it was definitely Ranger's (and my) problem.

I'd keep her on leash so you can enforce your commands outside and start doing more training there, especially since she already listens to you inside.

As for the recall, once Ranger learned the command "Come" then I started using treats sporadically (on leash). When his recall got really good, I'd call him in from playing with his buddy outside, give him a tasty treat, and let him out to play again. Now he doesn't hesitate to come in because he knows it doesn't automatically mean end of play time. I usually call him 4-5 times in 20 minutes of playing and let him go back out. It's worked really well for him since his main motivation is play.
 

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She's a doll? :D

She is also a puppy and wants to play. Try working her in the yard with the lead on, then removing it to have a play time. When you are playing "every" time she comes to you say "good come" and reward her. Make recall fun and a game and she will get better and better. Click on the lead and work so more - repeat play. Keep the work sessions short 5 - 10 mins. If it's fun they will do it and never realize it's training! ;)
I would do the same thing, I would also us a whisle, when you teach her to sit one toot. when you play catch blow it 3 time as she gets the ball she learn that to one toot to sit and 3 toots come back to you
 

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When you say she won't come when outside, do you mean inside your own fenced yard? I'm just asking because I am wondering if there is any risk of harm to her staying out longer (cause maybe she just needs and wants more outside time.) Is there a way that you can differentiate between times when you are controlling when she comes in (and those times keep a leash on her so she has to comply with your request) and times when she can stay out until she asks to be let back in (and then she's out on her own)?
 
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