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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Golden is "found treasure." So, I guess that, involuntarily makes her a rescue. I'm trying to get ready for grad school just now, which will mean a move. But, I am toying with the idea of adding a second pup to my home ones I'm resettled this fall.

Maybe.

I'm torn.

On the one hand, she gets on great with pups and dogs, so I think she'll do well. And, I love the idea of a new puppy. Plus, she's 5. So, it feels like she's just at the right age. She's still pretty puppyish, but there will still be a proper age difference between them.

On the other...will it feel less special to have multiples? And, I have to consider the added expense. Having one, I comprehend the added expense of owning one more.

I'm a little more curious about the added expense of buying? She's a true treasure, but we hit some medical bumps early, so I now just feel blessed she's healthy. To lean to the healthy hope, I would probably buy, not rescue the second time around.

What should I expect to pay for a well bred dog? (I am not looking for a show dog, and plan to spay, so I would not be looking for the pick of the litter. Just a really healthy female, preferably a blonde, not a redhead.) Can you give me a range to start wrapping my brain around?


(I assume fees may vary in certain areas. I'm in the midsouth, in Tennessee.)
 

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Two goldens is great. A puppy makes a great addition as they nap a lot so you can give the older dog attention while the puppy sleeps. I adopted an 8 month old when Oakly was 1.5 years and it was a little tough in the beginning but they are now best buds. I can give either of them attention without protests from the other. Older dogs really do take new puppies under their wing. My boys had a playdate today with Tucker and Tyson (12 wks) and Tucker really looked out for his little brother and my guys were extra gentle with the little guy. It was fun to watch them all interact.
 

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Having two doesn't make your relationship with either of them any less special than if you had one at a time. Both my dogs are very bonded to me and my fiance, but what's so special is the bond they have with eachother. :)
 

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I think that this is a great idea. Your dog is 5 and that is a nice age, in my opinion, to add another dog or puppy. They really do bond to one another and to you. I don't think that you have to be worried at all. In Dec. 08 my parent's female golden passed. Our male just didn't act the same, he missed HIS companion. I think that I will always have two someday. Right now, I'm anxiously awaiting my first puppy. He will be $1400, he is going to be a companion and do some obedience work. He will be coming from a breeder with healthy stock and has been in goldens for years and is still being mentored by another well respected breeder in my area. I think that you should be wary of those breeders in that charge way too much and those that charge way too little. Make sure that they do all 4 of the big clearances including OFA for hips, elbows, Cerf for eyes, and a cardiac clearance from a vet. specialist. There are some helpful stickies at the top of the Puppy/Breeder pages. You can also check out: http://www.goldenbreedersresource.org/ Also, check with your local GR Club.
 

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Price wise, an absolute minimum from a reputable breeder would probably be $800. You could probably find something easily enough in the $900-$1200 range. A lot of good breeders will charge more, but if price is a big issue you should be able to find a good pup in the above price range.
 

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More the merrier!!! No it won't make them feel less special, they will have each other to entertain when you are busy. Hey I have 3 dogs and have started looking for #4. It is just DH and I we can not imagine being without dogs. Four will be a lot of work but we like being with them so it will be a labor of love.

When I was looking for our current lab pup, and I will do the same with my golden, we set a high mark for money. I saw many at both ends of the spectrum. However when we found our breeder price was not a consideration. We loved the ethics, the clearances, and got many great referrals. Our pup ended up being almost 50% of our top dollar so that was even better. Pups range in price. The higher the price the parents better back up the reason. Personally I don't go too high, I had $1500 as top when we were looking for Quinn will probably be the same for our golden. These are "dogs" and there is no guarantee the pups will be what the pedigree says. It is hope, trust me I know, but I am a firm believer breeding is still a crap shoot.

I heard about a $25000 lab PUPPY!!! (yes 3 zeros) Dog sold a number of years ago. Guess what that dog can't get adequate clearances. Not worth the money that is for sure. I can understand paying for an older dog with training in it but on pup potential? I don't go too high. You have to decide what you can do, and consider all the early vet bills too. However you could contact your local rescue they may get a pup in and that may be just what you want.

Ann
 

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Once you have 2 you'll wonder why you never did before. My magic number seems to be 3. Check with your new local rescue when you move - we seem to be seeing more and more puppies lately.
 

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Having two doesn't lessen any of the bonds or make things less special. In fact, I feel like it adds a dimension to enjoying your dogs because of the way they interact together.

As far as cost for a dog from a careful breeding with all clearances, $800 is probably a bare minimum and $1000 more realistic, depending on your region. It's a bargain, really, since the $700 difference between a carefully bred dog and a backyard bred dog will disappear if there's even one preventable health crisis during the dog's life. Hip dysplasia will cost you ten times that difference over the course of the dog's life.

As far as maintenance costs of having two dogs, there's no economy of scale on vet bills. Having two dogs costs twice as much at the vet than having one. You can save a little on food and treats by buying the bigger bags, but that's about it.

I really believe all dog owners should have an emergency fund to which they contribute monthly. Put $100 per dog per month away for vet expenses and give it its own account. If your dog is miraculously healthy for his whole life, well then you have a few grand in the bank at the end of those 15 years (and then you can buy whatever dog you like or take on a rescue who needs some extra vet care).

The best part of having two dogs is knowing they have constant dog companionship in addition to their bond with their humans. The joy a dog gets from a ball or a walk in the woods increases exponentially when he has a sibling along for the ride. Plus, if your older dog is well-trained when you get your younger dog, the puppy has a far, far easier time learning basic commands.

We had just one for about five years, and then we got a second. We'll never go back. My dog blog (tippykayak.com) is essentially about the joys of owning two dogs. In fact, we're constantly experiencing serious temptation to add a third!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
(read and nod)

I love how encouraging you are on the furry-pair! I'll make the official decision next year.

I love the pet finances advice!

A couple of you mentioned rescuing again.... I might.... But, with my current sweet one, as a pup she came with worms. And an ear infection. We went through UTIs her first year (a particularly bad one when I first brought her home). Then a MASSIVE scare when they thought she had an autoimmune disorder. She has a plastic allergy. And, I still see the occasional ear infection.

It's small potatoes compared to something worse,...but it just makes me so sad when she's sick.... So, I'm thinking I want to gamble in favor of healthy next time.

(Don't blame a rescue org for sending me an untreated dog! She was an unofficial rescue. A stray had a litter of pups in a cave-of-hay out on my Grandad's farm. The above was her condition when we found them.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Did I type next year? Silliness. I meant to type "this fall."

Silliness. I'm not as awake as I thought!
 

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On the other hand...I personally know way too many people who spent the money, time, and research into getting a puppy from a good breeder. SOmetimes those breeders weren't as great as they first seemed, and sometimes the people had bad luck. (...I say this as someone who has had a super great breeder a super not cool one and a rescue!).

I personally did prefer having one dog. I'lll be a multidog household for a very long time. One dog was great because cuddling time? Great, with my boy. Walks? Great, with my boy. We could go to a ton of classes. We could go to the park together. We would do a bunch of training and fun and games. Each additional dog has brought more time management into the picture. And now with three dogs I'm struggling to give them the quality of life we had as a single dog household.

I do love having multiple dogs and they do love spending time together. I feel bad about not being able to give all the dogs multiple classes a week. I try to get everyone out for alone walks on a regular basis. Giving everyone multiple training sessions is a challenge as they don't all station well yet (...not been a priority...but now is!).

I am loving my three dog household! Really! After all those comments, my dogs are great and I love their interactions. If I had a different living situation I would even be fostering dogs!
 
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