Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,597 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:uhoh::uhoh::uhoh: For Christmas, I wrapped up and gave Brooks one of those sterilized leg bones from Petsmart (He has several old ones around here, and I never thought of them as a particularly "high value" thing of his).
He was pulling the paper off of it, and as it has plastic wrap around the bone, I reached over to take it from him to help him (as I didn't want him to eat the plastic), and HE GROWLED!!!:no::no::no::no::no: (I immediately took it away and put it up).
His growl was not a play growl, it was a warning growl. When my daughter heard it, she said, Wow, you better not let him ever get around little kids. They try to take things away from dogs all the time.
I started today with making him work for his breakfast, piece by piece. But what about the little child thing? (We have no little children to expose him to)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,436 Posts
Im sure that if he ever is around children that you won't let a situation like that happen. Crates and baby gates would be a must to protect both kids and Brooks.

Sounds like he is getting a bit too big for his boots! Use Nothing in Life is Free and maybe start teaching him to trade things with you? He has a toy and trades it for a bone, he has a bone and trades it for yummy chicken etc? Might help him realise that you won't take away the things he likes, he just gets something better!

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,753 Posts
:uhoh::uhoh::uhoh:
I started today with making him work for his breakfast, piece by piece. But what about the little child thing? (We have no little children to expose him to)
Lord knows I am no expert but it sounds like you are doing the right thing to me. Keep it up and hopefully this will translate when and if you do have children at the house.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,195 Posts
I am of the "older" school of dog training, and so I just throw this out for you to think about.
I believe in consequences for actions.
Once I had taken away the bone, I would have also made Brooks do an immediate "down stay". It's a very submissive position, and a reminder to the dog that his behavior will NOT be tolerated.
Meanwhile, I would work hard on the nothing in life is free training program, too, which of course you said you are doing.
 

·
Old Gold is the Best Gold
Joined
·
18,122 Posts
Any dog that growls at me, starts fights with the other dogs, or even looks sideways at my baby is out of here, since all three of those things could lead to an accidental or purposeful bite to my nine month old son.

I am by NO MEANS suggesting you get rid of your dog. Just that the situation is very different when children are involved. A large dog could inflict serious damage on a child even with a mild bite.

I think you did the right thing, and that NILIF will probably be a great start.
 

·
Nancy
Joined
·
7,493 Posts
I am of the "older" school of dog training, and so I just throw this out for you to think about.
I believe in consequences for actions.
Once I had taken away the bone, I would have also made Brooks do an immediate "down stay". It's a very submissive position, and a reminder to the dog that his behavior will NOT be tolerated.
Meanwhile, I would work hard on the nothing in life is free training program, too, which of course you said you are doing.
Yep, me too. The bone would be put up and the NILIF program put in effect immediately.

I don't know your dog's age, but he might just be testing the waters to see what he can get away with.

Sounds like you handled it the same way I would have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
When Daisy was just tiny at 10 weeks old, I tried to move a chew she had, and she growled a very nasty growl, as tiny as she was, I found it really really frightening.

So from that day on, and to this day (and I always will), I hold every chew or bone I give her and she is absolutely wonderful. When I let them go for her to chew them herself, she 'always' brings them to me to hold for her :)

We also don't have children, and she only ever see's children at the park (which she loves!) but I would never, and won't ever be in a situation where she has food around children anyway, she just wants to play with them, so I can't really give much advice on that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43,252 Posts
It sounds like you are doing the right thing, hopefully it was a one time thing. It does make you nervous and upset when you hear it for the first time.
 

·
clueless puppy owner
Joined
·
60 Posts
I have a question related to this.

When your dog growls and you immediately take back the bone, how does the dog interpret this?

a) I growl and the prize is gone?
or
b) See I was right to growl. He's always trying to take my stuff. ?

The reason I ask is I think Puf takes it the latter way and tries to guard his possession better next time.
 

·
chew chew chew
Joined
·
3,571 Posts
I have little kids around the dogs all the time and just don't take the risk. The dogs are fed in their crates or in the mudroom without kids pestering them, bones, same thing. Toys the dogs don't seem to get as worked up about and usually want the kids to throw for them (they've quickly learned kids love to throw balls in return for spastic efforts to fetch them while trashing the house).

What I have taught the dogs is that if they have something or are not comfortable with a kid in their space (the big issue seems to be when the kids are first mobile and into climbing and pinching), they are to move - not growl and tell the kid to move. I do this by taking the dog out of the area if I see them looking annoyed (they have plenty of kid free spaces to go to). Usually that is enough for them to clue in and they'll go 'hide' and get their space.

What I have taught the kids as they get older is to go around the dogs instead of over them, and to respect the dog's space. I don't allow or teach them that it's ok to climb or step on the dogs, that gets the kid put in time out as they get older, with a firm 'NO' from me. I also, when they have been pulling ears/lips, told both kids 'doggie bite, no!' and then taken their hand and put it in the dog's mouth and gently closed the muzzle so that each kid has felt the teeth. In both cases this seems to have clued them in to respecting dogs better.

In any case, I don't leave the dogs and kids alone without me watching. If a major bite were to happen, that would be the end of the dog and I'm not willing to risk that.

In any case, the NILIF works really well, he's likely just going through that phase of testing you. I would just never have bones/toys with a dog and kid in the same space anyhow.

Lana
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top