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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Very excited but also have a few concerns about settling him in especially at night so would like to know what others have done.

We want Max to eventually sleep in the kitchen area but to start with we were going to have a crate in the lounge which will be his den/bed, the door won't be locked. A puppy pen will then lead off the crate (so that he couldn't come to any harm) and we'll put newspapers down in this area. Does this sound ok?

My main worry is that I don't want to leave Max alone during the night for a while after we bring him home, not until he has settled in with us. I wouldn't be able to sleep knowing that he would be alone for the first time in his life, missing his mum and littermates, feeling frightened and worried in a strange place. I'd be checking him every few mins and I know this isn't the right way to go about it. Rather than have him in our room in the crate where he would have to be locked in I was thinking that I'd sleep downstairs for a few nights until he got used to his new life and surroundings.

I would appreciate your thoughts and advice :)
 

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Nancy
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Congratulation on your new puppy! A couple of ideas...

You mentioned not wanting Max locked in his crate at night, not crating him at night will really slow down your house breaking efforts. He may need to go out sometime during the night for the first week or so and being in a crate will teach him to 'hold it' until he gets to the proper place outdoors. I also wouldn't use newspapers, at some point you're not going to want him peeing/pooping on the paper, then you will need to have him un-learn that behavior.

Crating at night at this age will also signal that it's time for bed, time to settle down.
You will know he's safe and Max will feel safe in his own 'den'.

When we brought Hank home, we set up his crate in our bedroom. When we brought our last golden home (14 yrs. ago), her crate was in the kitchen. I remember her crying all night. Having Hank in our room was so much better, he could hear us breathing so he didn't feel so alone. I could quickly take him out if he needed to go, and if he did cry, I could easily 'ssssshhhh' him. It worked out so much better. I was in my own comfortable bed, he was in his own comfortable bed (crate). Is there a reason you don't want Max in the bedroom?

Don't forget to post some pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi and thanks for your reply and advice.

I think my reluctance to lock Max in a crate is because I read somewhere (not on this site) that it can cause a lot of trauma for a pup not used to it and that it should be introduced slowly over time which is difficult to do if you want the puppy to be safe from day one. However, when I had my Yorkie as a pup he was always locked in his crate at night and was by the side of my bed so that I could comfort him (he still sleeps in our room and for some of the night is on our bed with us). Maybe I should just go with what I know worked before because Bobby was fine during the night and housebreaking was a doddle.

For me, Max would sleep in our room permanently but hubby is another kettle of fish. I have had to train him to be a 'dog person' in some respects hee hee. Don't get me wrong, he is very much looking forward to Max coming home and I know he will love him to bits but he would prefer that any dog that we have in future has a bed downstairs. If we had the crate in our room to begin with, would it not cause problems later on when we wanted Max to move downstairs?

Here's Max with one of his littermates



 

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aka Ali, Oscar's mom
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Oscar now sleeps in a large wire crate in our living room with no problem. When we first brought him home, he slept in a small plastic crate that we set on some chairs right next to the bed. He cried a bit, but we could just stick our fingers in the crate and calm him down. One of us just fell asleep like that pretty often :)
That crate eventually migrated to the side of the room (up on chairs), then to the floor, then we switched to the large crate on the floor... then eventually that crate was moved to the living room.

EDIT: And Oscar had no problem moving to the living room after starting out in our room. However I forgot that the FIRST night we brought him home, we were surprised to discover that he was actually very concerned to go into our BEDROOM when it was time for bed. I guess he had become comfortable in the living room because we'd played with him all day and he'd had a chance to explore, so when we took him into the bedroom he was overwhelmed!! So I recommend letting your pup spend some time exploring during the day wherever he is going to sleep (even though he'll be in the crate) so he has time to adjust.

I agree with Willow52 about the newspapers not being very desirable; even though your pup might wake you up during the night with crying and need to take a potty trip outside, teaching potty training is the ultimate goal and having him have to "hold it" in the crate and let YOU know when he needs to go out is best (even if it means losing some sleep!). You can even set your alarm a few times during the night to preempt his needs if that means you get more consistent sleep periods. But honestly Oscar could pretty much hold it through the night pretty quickly, so this part at least wasn't an issue for us. :)

Also the crate should/will become a small, safe, protected area for him...therefore a bigger area with more room to move around at night really doesn't necessarily equal him feeling more secure. (Just more room to pee and NOT have to sleep in it.) LOL Nighttime doesn't need to be playtime anyway, he'll have lots of playtime during the day and puppies sleep a lot anyways! :)
 

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We just got two new pups. The first one slept with me on the couch immediately, and it really helped to form a strong bond with her. She couldn't go anywhere, because she was between me and the couch. She would sit up if she had to go out. With the second one, he is a little more active, so he slept in the crate, with one of us sleeping on the floor near it. Not the best night's sleep for us, but it was great for the puppies. They shouldn't be alone at night without their pack leaders nearby.
 

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Congrats on your new puppy!!

I think you've received some great advice. I'll just second closing the crate at night. When you bring puppy home, play in the crate around the crate, etc. Make it a fun place. Throw treats in, have the puppy retrieve them. Put him in for a few short periods with a special kong or treat. If he's being quiet and happy then you can let him out. Repeat!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks to all, definitely some great advice and tips there.

We have decided to crate train Max and have him with us in our room during the night :)

Let's hope he copes ok with hubs snoring!!!
 

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Let's hope he copes ok with hubs snoring!!!
I worried about that, but now the dh has a cpap so he doesn't snore, so what happens? now moose snores at night (luckily he sleeps with my daughter) i just have the ocean sounds from the cpap, one golden and 3 cats along with dh in the bed.

beth, moose and angel
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I worried about that, but now the dh has a cpap so he doesn't snore, so what happens? now moose snores at night (luckily he sleeps with my daughter) i just have the ocean sounds from the cpap, one golden and 3 cats along with dh in the bed
Haha Beth how do you get any sleep? It's bad enough with dh on one side and lil Bob on the other as he snores too. Sometimes they are in unison :mad:
 
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