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Hello Everyone,

My wife and I have recently decided to bring our 7 year old Golden, Gabriel, inside with us. He has lived outside for the last 7 years and I think everyone here would agree that he is better off inside with us. Has anyone here had experience with this? What are things I should prepare for? How can I address things like shedding and sharp nails. Should we use a crate for him to sleep in at night and stay in during the day? Would this be an issue since we are away at work for 8 hours during the day? Is crate training difficult in older dogs? We have a 16 month old son also. Our dog is great with him but should we watch out for anything since he will be spending more time indoors now? Sorry for all the questions. I really appreciate your input.

Thanks,
Chris
 

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Is he housebroken? Does he have any manners? Can he be in part of the day and outside part of the day? How did you contain him before?

Shedding: fact of life with a golden. Wooden floors are good. Dyson vac is great. Throw rugs and blankets over areas he will lay. Give him his own dog bed or spot to be in.

You can clip nails, discourage running and sliding in the house.

Kids; I don't have any advice except never leave them alone; never let your child mess with the dog. Don't feed the dog around the child. I'm sure others will chime in.

And yes, goldens belong in the house. Their sensitive nature makes it doubly intolerable to be away from their family. Kudos to you for bringing him in.
 

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Now Caue's Dad Too!
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Welcome to the forum. Thank you for bringing your golden inside with you. Goldens are very social animals and need to spend time with their peeps. I've never tried crating an older dog so I can't offer any advice but it is the best way to keep your home and family safe. You may have a few sleepless nights ahead but it will be worth it. Frequent brushing is the best way to limit the amount of hair buildup in your house.
 

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P.S. for my older rescues I did not use a crate but I did use a leash to keep them in the areas I wanted them to be in. I also used gates to keep them in rooms I wanted them to stay in and LOTS of LOTS of things to chew and play with. You do not want him chewing your furniture so you have to give him an alternative...
 

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Kristy
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Welcome to the forum. Yes, you are absolutely correct, Gabriel is much better off living in the house with you. Most dogs, but Goldens in particular, are too people-oriented and social to have a decent quality of life as an outdoor dog unless you are out there with them.

Has Gabriel ever been in the house? Is he house trained? Is he crate trained? What is his current sleeping situation? Are there any other dogs outside with him currently?

The answers to these questions may help experienced people on this site give you useful help. In the meantime, I think I would purchase extra baby gates and introduce him to the house gradually. Limit him to the kitchen and main living area until you are certain that he will not give you problems if he is bored or unattended.

Just like a new puppy coming into the house, he should have have his own bed or safe place to retreat and toys that are his to carry around so he can learn which toys are his and which toys are the baby's and off limits.

If it turns out that you do not have the time or resources to patiently teach Gabriel about life living indoors with his family and a toddler (I'm sure it will take some time) please consider finding a new home for him or surrendering him to a rescue so that they may find a family for him who will have him living indoors. I can't stress to you enough that dogs, ESPECIALLY golden retrievers are meant to live with their people and not be alone outdoors.

I wish you success with brining him indoors.
 

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Firstly, THANK YOU for deciding to bring your dog indoors. Goldens are people dogs, they LOVE being with their families.

I've never had to bring a dog inside, they've always been indoors, so I don't have much advice.

You can keep the dogs nails trimmed, it shouldn't scratch the floors.

As far as shedding goes, there's a lot of fur on Goldens haha but daily brushing will help eliminate some of the fur on the floors.

I'm sure others will offer great advice!
 

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Golden retrievers are family dogs that belong inside.

What have you seen that indicates that there will be an issue? In my opinion GRs don't really grow up until they are six so now is a wonderful time.

Let him in while being supervised and extend the times.

Your son needs to be supervised around Gabriel at all times as children can be quite unpredictable.

The only problem I would anticipate is toilet training. Has he been inside during the day at times? Is he already toilet trained? If not he needs to be taken out regularly and highly praised for going to the toilet outside as often as possible.

He should not be punished for going to the toilet inside, if he does but he should be quickly ushered outside to the same spot. As they say keep a rolled up newspaper to hit YOURSELF over the head with it if an accident happens and tell yourself repeatedly, "I must take my GR out more regularly."

I would try to avoid using a crate for a dog who is used to wide spaces and the big outdoors. He may need to be restricted to an ensuite or a bathroom while you are sleeping if there are toilet training issues.

You might find that he will ask to have his own space outside quite often because that is what he is used to.

Buy yourself a Dyson dust buster and a vacuum cleaner for the hair. Lay runners down in the floor boards and prepare yourself for the most grateful and loving family dog who has only ever wanted your time and praise.

The small draw backs (the hair and possibly sharp nails) are a small price to pay for the beauty, love and entertaining nature of these wonderful buddies.

PS I love the name :D
 

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Knife Swallower
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Ditto the above comments that say thank you for bringing him in the house. For the questions, there might be a small adjustment period for your family and Gabriel when you bring him inside BUT it will be small. Dogs are very adaptable. Case in my point: My dog lived outside for the first nine months of his life (chained to a tree) until he was rescued and subsequently adopted by me. He'd never been in a house, wasn't house-broken, hadn't ever walked on carpet or linoleum or hardwood floors, and didn't know how to get up or down stairs. Worse, he'd had little human interaction so wasn't sure about basic puppy manners, i.e. nipping humans hurts. Basically he was a puppy in a 70 lb dog body.

He was house broken in under a day. Figured out stairs and carpet and lino, etc. just as quickly. Lots of training and boundaries inside taught him what was and wasn't acceptable. For instance, he wasn't allowed in the bathroom or the kitchen. The garbage was kept away from him in a sealed container he couldn't open. Dog food was stored in another room entirely that he didn't have access to. Overall, he figured out the basics in days and the other stuff in a few weeks.

I think it's important that everyone in the family agrees on rules or else it'll be hard on everyone and Gabriel might find his way back outside. Have a family meeting and WRITE down the rules everyone agrees on, like no sleeping on the bed and couch, no getting fed from the table, no mooching in the kitchen when meals are getting prepared, etc. If they aren't clearly discussed then someone might be annoyed that there's golden dog hair on the couch when the 'rule' was supposed to be that he wasn't allowed up there...but not realize that someone else was encouraging it. That only puts Gabriel in the middle and that is not a good place to be.

A basic obedience class would probably be really helpful. Most teach household manners like off, leave it, bed, go lie down, etc. Everything that a well-adjusted house dog should learn. Grooming appointments every few months will help reduce shedding and take care of nails. Vets will do nails, too. Or you can learn to do them yourself, there's lots of great threads on how to do it on this board for more in-depth instructions. Regular brushing with a good brush (a rake and pin brush) will help keep hair shedding down, as will a good diet and frequent baths. You may have to haul out the vacuum cleaner a little more often or the swiffer, especially when he'll blow his coat twice a year. But I think you'll come to love having him in the house. Goldens are made to be part of the family and once everyone gets used to it, I think you'll be amazed he wasn't in the house sooner.
 

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Knife Swallower
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Oh, and I'd read up on crate-training so he knows the crate is a GOOD thing before he gets left in it for 8 hours a day. You don't want it associated with punishment, only good things, and most dogs do learn to love their crate but it does take time. I would crate until you know he's 100% potty-trained and is trustworthy when no one is home. You don't want to leave him alone for 8 hours too soon and come home to a mess and then kick him back out to the yard.

If you need crate-training advice, I had a thread on it for my foster puppy Scarlett in the foster forum. For a 8 week old pup or 7 year old dog, the basics of crate-training remain the same. I think it the thread was "help, scarlett hates her crate" or something like that. Lots of good advice and within a week or so, she was liking her crate!
 
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Thanks for all the advice. I should have mentioned that when we first adopted Gabriel we kept him indoors. He was actually kept indoors for the first 6-8 months of his life. At the time we would let him sleep in an enclosed area of our garage. We now wish we had never moved him outdoors. At least with us it has become very easy to forget that he is out there. Having a child only made that worse. That's why we are choosing to bring him in now. He's a part of our family and deserves to be treated as such. We would like to keep him in the play room in a crate at night if possible but using safety gates sounds like a good option as well. What to do with him during the day is what concerns me. He does have a 50ft by 20ft fenced area that we could keep him in if necessary. He is house trained and is very familiar with our home.

Thanks again for all the input
 

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Welcome a thank you for bring your dog into the house. I would take it slowly if he has never been indoors before.

You have plenty of good advice and I would definitely use baby gates or an x-pen rather then a crate, especially if he is used to open space, confining him to a crate for several hours will be a bad experience for him. Go slowly.

Also if he has never been in the house he may find it strange a scary, everyday noises, sights and smells will be foreign to him, it is going to take time to acclimate him, do not rush this process, you want him to comfortable and confident in the house.

You may also want to install a dog door, he may always be more comfortable outside and his safe place may just be your back porch. This will also let him acclimate in his own time frame, but the more you invite him in and encourage him to be part of the family indoors the more he will want to be with you inside.

Good luck.
 

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I think you will find that Gabriel will transisiton to being an inside dog a lot easier than you might think, with very few problems.

Best of luck to you and I hope you will keep us updated on his progress.
 

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If you exercise him before leaving for work (aka throwing the ball for him in the yard for 20mins), I almost bet he would sleep very peacefully in your home till you got home. I give my dogs free roam of the house. Of course I take steps like putting all food away and closing off rooms that might have things of interest. But for the most part a well exercised dog, will be much less likely to be destructive. Especially if he is rewarded when you come home, with attention he wasn't getting before. I think you will find he is a very well behaved boy. It might even help to also exercise him when you get home, so he burns off some of the pent up energy from sleeping all day. It might make it less overwhelming for you, as he will be craving your attention as soon as you get home from work, even though you might have other chores to do. So I find it helps to expend that extra energy positively with a quick game of ball or better yet a walk around the block, walking is so good for dogs. Does he walk on a leash? You could probably help potential problems, by regularly walking him (with manners) every day. It instills some discipline in him, and he will respect/love you more for it! Also an obedience class wouldn't hurt either, just to get him more adjusted to being around people and bonding with you. As it seems there have been distance between him and the family for most of his life, so he might not feel like he fits in right away.
 

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Leland

Leland

Oh, I am so glad that you are bringing him inside with the family-he is part of the family and will love it. I don't think you will run into any problems at all with him.

If you do run into any snags, I am sure you will get lots of great pointers here.
I see there have been some great suggestions already!
What is his name?
 

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& Sawyer's & Quinn's too!
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He's going to be SO SO happy to be with his family!!!! Make sure to take some pictures of his happy-self and post them here!

Thanks for bringing him back inside!
 

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Nancy
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Since you say he's housebroke, you probably won't have any problems with the transition. I'd confine him at first to a safe area/room.

He'll be so happy to be living indoors with his family again. I know my guy won't stay out longer than a few minutes if we aren't out there.
 

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He is house trained and is very familiar with our home.
I like the dog door idea :D

If he is house trained there should be no issues or need for a crate at the age of 7. IMO destruction occurs in puppyhood or when the dog is bored from neglect from being shut away from its family. If Gabriel is a part of the family this should not be an issue.

If you are worried about what to do with him when you go out put him outside as he is quite familiar with this.

Nails and hair are small fry compared to the companionship and the love that Gabriel has for you.

Why hesitate? Hurry up and bring your wonderful boy in with your family for the love and attention he deserves!:D
 

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Tracer, Rumor & Cady
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it will be a period of adjustment....even though he is 7 and has experience being indoors...

If you manage him as a pup that needs time and TLC...it will be easier to help him through the rough spots.....mange his time wtih exercise and training...manage his space with gates/pens/crates...

No unsupervised time between child and dog... hand on the child or hand on the dog at all times.

Gabriel is a lucky dog to have people that realize they could do better and are willing to actually do better..

There are solutions to nearly every problem...dont let a problem get big....holler for ideas...
 

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Thank you for deciding to bring your family member inside to live with the family. Just be patient and give everyone time to adjust to having him inside with you, you will be so glad you did this !
 
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