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I am a new member. I have the sweetest 2 1/2 year old golden. I would like to breed her and have looked on the internet for stud services in the area and have found a couple. She is not a show dog, she is just a great family dog and other than needing the male to be AKC certified (she is as well) I don't think I need to be concerned about anything specific ...? Any suggestions or information that I need to be aware of would be appreciated.

Here is her blog. We just love her soooo, and she definitely is a spoiled one!!!

http://roxythegoldenretriever.blogspot.com/
 

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Tracer, Rumor & Cady
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Please read the puppy buyers checklist....those are the things that smart puppy buyers are going to be looking for....

AKC certified only means that you can prove parentage...it says nothing about the temperment & health of the dog.

Honestly, it is not enough any longer to have a nice family dog and breed her.
 

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Roxy may be a wonderful dog but there are tons of wonderful golden retrievers out in the world right now.
It is really important to do all the testing suggested by the Golden Retriever Club when thinking of breeding. Have you done any of the testing? I would suggest finding a quality golden retriever breeder in your area and ask if you can be mentored by that person. Also, it may be good to have Roxy evaluated. A quality breeder doesn't just go and put to pretty dogs together to make pups, they evaluate the entire dog and dogs that are related then they decide what their dog needs to in the stud to compliment them and make the pups even better than the parents.

I read and enjoyed Roxy's blog. :)
 

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Go above and beyond to see if Roxy is very healthy genetically by having her hips and elbows xrayed by an expert in orthopedics, and then her xrays sent to OFAhttp://www.offa.org/. Her heart should be checked by a cardiologist and then her eyes examined and certified.

Any boy you choose for Roxy should have these clearances as well, for the sake of the future babies' health.

All goldens carry risks of genetic problems, and really caring breeders try hard to screen them out.
 

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Hopefully, where you live, there are no pet limit laws so you can be allowed to breed. Does your city/county also require a breeder's license? If so, you had better apply.

Good breeders are not only responsible when it comes to the health of the pups they produce, they are also responsible when it comes to animal ordinances and laws that might impact them and their hobby. (IMHO)
 

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At a minimum, both Roxy and the stud dog would need the following:

OFA hips and elbows-these x-rays can be taken by your vet and sent to OFA for evaluation. The purpose is to ensure that neither dog has hip or elbow dysplasia, which are inheritable problems. Ideally, great grandparents and grandparents of both Roxy and the stud dog would also have had this done. The problem with hip dysplasia is that it is often not obvious and you can't tell without xrays. Also, if ancestors of Roxy or the stud dog had hip dysplasia it is very possible that their puppies could have it as well, due to the unknown inheritance of hip dysplasia.

OFA for heart-this should be done by a veterinary cardiologist. They are checking primarily for SAS, which is a heart defect that can cause sudden death as a worst case, and can cause murmurs of varying degrees in other cases, with varying impact on the health of the dog.

CERF for eyes-Goldens have a number of inherited eye problems ranging from juvenile hereditary cataracts, which may not cause vision problems in your dog but, if bred to a dog with this in its background could, to pigmentary uvieitis, an increasing common problem causing pain and leading to eventual blindness if not caught and treated early. Dogs who have been bred need to have their eyes checked every year, as some of these problems don't show up until a dog is older.

Neither Roxy or the stud dog should suffer from allergies or thyroid issues, both being very common in Golden Retrievers.

The reason for these health checks is so that the puppies you are responsible for, are given the best chance in the world to be healthy and pain free. And to make sure that their families don't have to suffer the consequence of owning a dog with chronic health problems.

And it would be good to have Roxy and the stud dog evaluated by someone familiar with the Golden standard, ideally by someone who competes in conformation or field. A poorly constructed Golden can be subject to joint and bone problems later in life.

This is also not necessarily the best time to be having a litter of 8-12 puppies, who will have to be kept, socialised and exposed to different experience prior to going home at 8 weeks of age. You need to be prepared to hang onto to several puppies for the weeks or months it may take to sell them. Puppy buyers are increasingly more sophisticated and aware of what clearances are necessary, so not having them can put you at a definite disadvantage. And, you are not going to want to sell your puppies to just anybody with a checkbook or cash, so you may need to hold onto them until the right homes are found.

Not to mention the not-so-fun part of breeding. We have at least one breeder on here who lost her darling girl during the whelping process, and another one very recently who almost lost his girl. Both breeders incurred huge vet bills, and almost lost puppies as well, as they struggled to feed and care for new born pups whose mother was either dead or too ill to care for them.

Breeding is a huge responsibility and needs to be done the right way, not only for the sake of the puppies, but for the families they will join.

Please read this

http://www.grca.org/allabout/a_find.html

and make sure you would fit the requirements recommended to those looking for a Golden puppy.
 

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Loving goldens since '95
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Golden Retrievers are susceptible to so many dieases and health problems that can be minimized through the proper screening of both the sire and dam prior to breeding.

We all love our dogs and think that they would all make the perfect candidate for breeding, but please, for the sake of all the puppies and the breed itself, make sure that you have all of the proper health clearances certified by all of the appropriate agencies. Hips, Elbows, Eyes, Heart and Thyroid.

There are so many friendly and helpful people on this board if you have any questions. We're all here because we love our dogs and love our golden retrievers and only want the best for them! :)
 

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Thank you all ... so quick and so much good info!!! I am so impressed by this group... I will need to carefully read through, do some more research on some of the points of consideration you mentioned, and will get back to you all with more questions probably. As novices we certainly did not understand how involved is the process of selection! Thank you again for caring about Roxy, the pups, and the breed!!
And what a bunch of great looking goldens!
 

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Good job that you are asking these questions now-kudos to you!

And we love pictures (hint hint!).
 

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In addition to the items Tahnee GR stated, you should seek the aid of another experienced breeder to help you select a Sire. You need somebody who is familiar with the pedigree and ancestors of both the prospective Sire and Roxy.
 

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Hi and welcome to the forum! I want to second what Tahnee said, it's great that you are asking questions and doing research before breeding Roxy. You will "meet" some great people here on the forum, and some very, very knowledgeable breeders.
One that wasn't mentioned is that you should at the very least get a CCA on both Roxy and the potential stud dog. You can find information about it on the Golden Retriever Club of America's website, www.grca.org. Basically, it's an event sponsored by local golden retriever clubs at which 3 independent judges review the dog based on 10 physical attributes plus temperament and then give it a Certificate of Conformation Assessment. They are certifying that your dog conforms to the golden retriever standard.
There are a lot of lovely goldens who still should not be bred because they are not to the breed standard.
Why?
I have a 12 year old male who came from people who either didn't know or didn't value the fact that the dogs should be to the standard (live and learn). He's oversized, standing 25-1/2 inches tall and weighing a very lean 80 pounds. So now I have the heartbreak of watching my best friend barely able to get up off the floor because he's got structural problems because he's too big for the breed. Meanwhile, my 13 year old female, who is to the standard, pops right up even though she's a year older. It's heartbreaking to watch him struggle and suffer. I'd never want to pass that on to potential puppy owners.
Here's a link to the GRCA website which gives some information about the CCA.

http://www.grca.org/events/cca/index.html


Good job that you are asking these questions now-kudos to you!

And we love pictures (hint hint!).
 

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You could not go wrong by letting Tahnee's wisdom guide you. With her good eye for goldens, great ethics, and long experience, she will be able to tell you so very much you need to know before making breeding decsions! I say, stick with Linda.
 
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