Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A neighborhood down the street from me is part of my daily walk routine. A family acquired from a rescue source a female pit bull, now called an American Terrier. I didn't know the dog and quite likely she's a sweet, but large femela, that accepts humans but not other dogs. Daughter of owner walking the dog, daughter a 13 year old lightweight and is literlally dragged to the ground by the pit bull and like a patriot missile homes in on me and Boomer (Boomer a 14 moth old 75 lb male with not a mean hair in his body). With little or no warning the pit bull is on Boomer's throat and through luck, divine intervention, great athleticism (lol) I manage to plant a very well-placed kick to the pit bull's head that sends her scurrying: end of battle. As a concealed carry permit holder I never thought of using a handgun as the inherent dangers of a weapon far overshadows any likelihood of stopping the assailant. So, what to do? A police officer friend of mine recommended pepper spray, and that a well placed stream ahead of the path of the dog likely would have thwarted its advance. I now carry a pepper spray, easily and legally acquired e.g. on Amazon, and hope it will do the job in the future.

As a new dog owner in Mar 2017 I hope to do all of the 'right' things: e.g. vet exams, food, meds, etc. but hardly thought of pet protection, even for myself. I only posted this as a point to consider. No harm, no foul, this time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Hindsight 20-20

Yes, the father was appalled and totally unsuspecting of the dog's behavior. And, the daughter had walked the dog before without incident. This was just one of those events, unplanned and without any expectation of 'bad' happening. The neighbors rallied around with the usual pit bull comments, mentioned police action, and the nastiness associated with the breed, but it seems to have gone its course; and I wrote the post more as a warning that bad things can indeed happen and like me, perhaps better planning than a lucky kick is needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
I have had a lot of bad experiences with sudden attacks by dogs, as I was a dog walker, so I was out walking all the time. I have had some people mention carrying a walking stick to hit the dog with, pepper spray, and a really nice tactical flashlight to shine directly in the oncoming dog's eyes. I actually know a major trainer of German shepherds who recommended the flashlight approach, and they are a hard breed. I've not tried it myself though.

The week after thanksgiving, my friend was walking her beagle down the sidewalk when the neighbor's new pit bull rescue broke THROUGH the fence, jumped over the 3 foot front yard fence, ran across the street, and mauled their beagle. He ended up in the hospital for a week, and he is now quarantined to make sure he did not get rabies from the pit. It is scary what dogs of any breed can be capable of if they really feel like it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
OMG, how horrible. Didn't even consider the rabies/quarantine aspect. I've read that neighborhoods, towns, counties, etc. have even banned some breeds, to include pit bulls, etc. I also carry a tactical flashlight at night, but other than the 3--5 D cell Maglite model that may be used as a weapon, I'm dubious about the light in eyes effect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
A neighborhood down the street from me is part of my daily walk routine. A family acquired from a rescue source a female pit bull, now called an American Terrier. I didn't know the dog and quite likely she's a sweet, but large femela, that accepts humans but not other dogs. Daughter of owner walking the dog, daughter a 13 year old lightweight and is literlally dragged to the ground by the pit bull and like a patriot missile homes in on me and Boomer (Boomer a 14 moth old 75 lb male with not a mean hair in his body). With little or no warning the pit bull is on Boomer's throat and through luck, divine intervention, great athleticism (lol) I manage to plant a very well-placed kick to the pit bull's head that sends her scurrying: end of battle. As a concealed carry permit holder I never thought of using a handgun as the inherent dangers of a weapon far overshadows any likelihood of stopping the assailant. So, what to do? A police officer friend of mine recommended pepper spray, and that a well placed stream ahead of the path of the dog likely would have thwarted its advance. I now carry a pepper spray, easily and legally acquired e.g. on Amazon, and hope it will do the job in the future.

As a new dog owner in Mar 2017 I hope to do all of the 'right' things: e.g. vet exams, food, meds, etc. but hardly thought of pet protection, even for myself. I only posted this as a point to consider. No harm, no foul, this time.
Make sure you have the stream type rather than the fogger....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,655 Posts
My husband is a retired detective. I told him I wanted to get pepper spray in case of such an attack. He said if there is the slightest breeze you and your own dog will get a good dose of the spray too. I bought a citronella spray which I always carry, I just hope it is strong enough should its use is required.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,492 Posts
A Lowe's employee in my town told me he witnessed a man walking his Bullmastiff by a car with a dog in the car and an open window. The dog attacked the dog in the car, with the dog still being in the car. Who would have ever thought a dog could be attacked in his own car!
 

·
Kate
Joined
·
21,874 Posts
We had something similar nearly happen when a then 8 or 9 year old neighbor boy walked his newly adopted australian cattle dog past our property when my dogs back then were loose.

The cattle dog slipped his collar and started going after my dogs, particularly my little redhead boy who was fortunately very fast and very agile and did not let that dog get anywhere near him before I caught the dog and dragged him by the scruff back to his owner.

Fwiw - I was about 13 or 14 at the time. I don't think 13 year olds should be molly coddled and not be trusted with responsibilities with the dogs. And they should be able to walk the family dogs and take over some of the dog training.

If 3-6 year olds can ride and control horses (and yes they can - I used to help teach riding lessons to kids that little), 13 year old's can control dogs.

I've had a few issues with neighbor dogs - this includes dogs jumping 6 foot fences or running through those stupid invisible fences or outright getting away from their owners and coming out to try to rip out my dog's neck....

Best way to dispatch them is a well aimed kick. You can also carry a stick and use that to beat off a dog before he gets at yours.

I'd hesitate to use pepper spray and honestly am not a fan of people using guns to dispatch dogs they are afraid of. Some people who do that are going off their instincts or fears and not reading the situation correctly in all cases.

My dogs are trained not to approach people. IF they are loose on a trail and other people and dogs approach from the distance, my dogs usually see them before I do and come running to my side to sit and wait as they have been trained.

That said, if my dogs were like the majority of other untrained golden retrievers out there and go running up to meet strangers... I don't want to think of a freak pulling a gun and shooting my dog. There ARE people out there like that though.

One of the funniest (but saddest) memories I have was a meter man who was terrified of my Bertie when he was a 9 week old puppy. He came on the property and was showing all signs of being ready to kick my puppy or my then 5 year old golden if they approached him and he was yelling at me to collect my dogs. Some people are real bimbos when it comes to dogs. <= Anyway would not encourage a precedent of shooting dogs if they scare you. Most cases you don't need to do that. The dogs will take off running if you kick them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
My Golden was Bitten by a Pit Bull on the leg a year ago in an outdoor restaurant here in Florida. Lucky it did not get a ligament the Doctor stated or if it was a larger Pit he could have more damage. The restaurant does no longer allow Pit Bull's in there. But recently on our neighborhood walk some people feel they can allow there dog's to be off leash. There is a big breed dog I think it may be some type of mix that came charging across the street and tried to attack my Logan. The owner came running and got it before any thing happened. Well little did he know that I had in my hand a very good stun gun that is also a tactical flash light. I carry this all the time on my neighborhood walks. Pepper spray is OK but you have to be aware of the wind direction so you don't get it in your eyes. Don't know what your state laws are but check them out online, Bull Dog Security.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
I have had some really hard experiences with dogs trying to attack my dog. We have been lucky that no damage was done and she hasn’t let it affect her. She still loves other dogs and seems unfazed by the experiences. Pit bulls are somewhat of a problem here in philly and when I lived in Baltimore. I don’t like to breed shame anyone but all arrows point to an issue. Anyways, thank you for the idea. I think I will order pepper spray online today and carry it with me on all walks. As a female walking mostly alone, it’s a good measure to have anyways. With our new puppy, we are even more paranoid with dogs in this city.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
487 Posts
My first golden was attacked by a pittbull too-at an equestrian (horse) campground with lots of children running around and rules stating dogs must be leashed. My mom doesn't ride horses so she walked our dog while my sister & I rode horses and my dad and one of my brothers were fishing. My youngest brother was a baby in a stroller at the time (what if the dog had gone for him instead of our dog?). Unleashed pitt came out of nowhere and latched onto Autumn's neck. Thankfully, it happened near the campsite of our friends and they came out and beat the pitt off of Autumn. A "friend of the owner" came to get the dog offering no help to pull it off our dog. :mad: When my dad found out he was livid and went to find the dog and the owner to have a "chat" but the dog was nowhere to be found-presumably they removed the dog from the campground before they could get in trouble. Autumn was unharmed by the incident, thankfully; but we all kinda freak out whenever we see pitts at campgrounds (or anywhere for that matter) now. And I have worked as a groomer at a vet clinic and that has not made my opinion of pitts any better. I find myself inwardly rolling my eyes whenever I hear the "pitts are sweet" thing from people. I'm sure there are some who are sweet, but I simply can't trust them after the experiences I've had with them and the many, many stories like this that I hear. It seems they are all owned by people who are in denial that their pitt could possibly be aggressive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Cooper has been attacked twice by pit bulls that broke free of their owners. I’ve thought about carrying pepper spray myself. But I’ve also read plenty of stories of people, including police officers, putting two, three or more bullets into an attacking pit without the dog releasing its victim. So will pepper spray stop them?
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top