Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Now Caue's Dad Too!
Joined
·
37,489 Posts
I don't have much experience with Bloodhounds but my neighbors have one and I know when he is outside. :p: On the plus side he does have a nice deep bark that doesn't bother me at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,939 Posts
My neighbors had a bloodhound, poor guy didn't even last a year, they were having their first kid and the husband was a flyer so the wife was left to care for the pup + baby. He was adorable as a pup, but the bigger he grew & the more active he got, he ended up spending more & more time outside where the rest of the neighborhood got to listen to him bark (more like bellow) day & night. I guess like any breed, you have to do your research & make sure it's a good fit...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,537 Posts
You should make sure to get one from breeder Harlan Pepper and his stud, Hubert. Pine Nut, NC--owns a fly fishing shop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,934 Posts
We never laughed in your previous thread because you want a bloodhoud. I had to laugh at the memories I have of my cousin's 2 bloodhounds and what a handful they both were. They are extremely difficult to train and the drooling and howling are nonstop. That is how bloodhounds are. We were never laughing at you. You asked for an opinion and both PG and I stated ours from our experiences with the breed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,448 Posts
Just my opinion, but I can't imagine having one in a neighborhood with neighbors that lived close on either side. I would think you'd run the risk of noise complaints because they can really howl. I have also heard that they are hard to train and that you have to be very vigilant with them because of their strong sense of smell. If they get out of the yard, you have to worry about them following their nose for a looooong way.

That being said, they are very sweet dogs. Very patient.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,164 Posts
My aunt has a bloodhound. She has had some aggression issues with it, but I don't know how much of that is the breed, and how much is the fact that it's from a backyard breeder and was taken at 5 or 6 weeks.

As for male or female, I don't know anything about the differences in that breed. I do know that in dogs in general, girls are more likely to have major problems than boys. While some get along great, each addition is a chance that there will be a problem. I personally won't have more than one girl in my house at a time.
 

·
...
Joined
·
16,000 Posts
Directly from The American Bloodhound Club site:

A Bloodhound can be the world's most wonderful pet - IF. But it's a big if. Bloodhounds are gentle and loving - but big and bumbling. They can be high maintenance pets, because having a happy, well-behaved Bloodhound in your home requires lots of time and effort. A bloodhound may be the dog for you IF you have lots of time and patience. Bloodhounds can be stubborn, and training a Bloodhound requires tons of both. You can't just tell a bloodhound what to do, the way you can a spaniel. IF you don't mind the mess and slobber that come with a big, jowly dog that loves mud and rolling in things, the stinkier the better. IF you have a sense of humor as good as your Bloodhound's.
Puppies are a special challenge. A Bloodhound puppy requires a great deal of exercise; the only "good" puppy is a tired puppy. It will follow its nose into trouble again and again. Bloodhounds have been known to eat towels, batteries, remote controls, antique rockers, car seats, - every bloodhound owner can add to the list - and they often require expensive surgery after one of these tasting adventures. They can be fence jumpers, climbers, and diggers. They have to be walked on leash, and can pull as hard as a truck.
If you don't think life would be worth living without a Bloodhound, you probably qualify as a Bloodhound owner. If you're not convinced, you should think twice or three times
 

·
Magica Goldens
Joined
·
1,363 Posts
Directly from The American Bloodhound Club site:IF you don't mind the mess and slobber that come with a big, jowly dog that loves mud and rolling in things, the stinkier the better.
A friend of mine is a bloodhound breeder - remember Knotty the bloodhound?

I admire her dogs. I think her dogs are amazing and they've given me a whole new appreciation for a breed I hadn't spent much (any) time with...BUT (and you knew that was coming) the amount of slobber her bloodhounds put off (out) boggles my mind. Her dogs are so clean, well mannered - but there's a lot of spit involved. Since I've known her dogs I've met a few other bloodhounds that were not so clean - their wrinkles need to be cleaned daily or the spit and gunk get stuck in the crevices and create infection and stink....they are not a low-maintenance breed by any stretch of the imagination.

My advice: meet a breeder, meet her dogs - spend time with her dogs. Heck, see if you can foster a bloodhound rescue - they are great dogs but not for everyone.

Erica
 

·
...
Joined
·
16,000 Posts
A friend of mine is a bloodhound breeder - remember Knotty the bloodhound?

I admire her dogs. I think her dogs are amazing and they've given me a whole new appreciation for a breed I hadn't spent much (any) time with...BUT (and you knew that was coming) the amount of slobber her bloodhounds put off (out) boggles my mind. Her dogs are so clean, well mannered - but there's a lot of spit involved. Since I've known her dogs I've met a few other bloodhounds that were not so clean - their wrinkles need to be cleaned daily or the spit and gunk get stuck in the crevices and create infection and stink....they are not a low-maintenance breed by any stretch of the imagination.

My advice: meet a breeder, meet her dogs - spend time with her dogs. Heck, see if you can foster a bloodhound rescue - they are great dogs but not for everyone.

Erica
They are cool dogs. But definitely not for everyone.
It should be noted that there are also health issues - hip and elbow dysplasia are a big problem in the breed. Ear infections are a huge problem, and they do have a very high incidence of bloat/torsion, which is actually being looked into as being hereditary in the breed. Hereditary eye problems are big, too, such as entropion and ectropion, and regular eye care is a must.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,195 Posts
I dislike boarding them because of the slobber....and slobber doesn't just hit the floor. They tend to shake their heads, and the slobber is wall to wall....on the ceiling...on you....
NASA should develop a use for the stuff. It's slippery when you step on it (yes, there's that much of it), and almost impossible to get off of surfaces.
But other than that, the ones I've encountered have been nice, although noisy, dogs.
I also think that everyone considering any breed, including of course goldens, should answer the question of WHY do they want that particular breed? A lot of good breeders also seem to ask that question flat out.
I'm not looking for you to answer it, just commenting that everyone should do some "soul searching" as to their motives for getting any particular breed before they go ahead and get the puppy.
 

·
Magica Goldens
Joined
·
1,363 Posts
They are cool dogs. But definitely not for everyone.
It should be noted that there are also health issues - hip and elbow dysplasia are a big problem in the breed. Ear infections are a huge problem, and they do have a very high incidence of bloat/torsion, which is actually being looked into as being hereditary in the breed. Hereditary eye problems are big, too, such as entropion and ectropion, and regular eye care is a must.
Most bloodhound people tack stomachs at the same time as they do OFA prelims...or so I've heard.
E
 

·
...
Joined
·
16,000 Posts
Most bloodhound people tack stomachs at the same time as they do OFA prelims...or so I've heard.
E

This is true - mostly people who show (makes sense, since it is mostly show people who do OFA's...)
It's hard to imagine having to do such a procedure as a gastropexy as a matter of "routine" prevention. The procedure itself is not without possible complications...
 

·
...
Joined
·
16,000 Posts
I dislike boarding them because of the slobber....and slobber doesn't just hit the floor. They tend to shake their heads, and the slobber is wall to wall....on the ceiling...on you....
NASA should develop a use for the stuff. It's slippery when you step on it (yes, there's that much of it), and almost impossible to get off of surfaces.
But other than that, the ones I've encountered have been nice, although noisy, dogs.
I also think that everyone considering any breed, including of course goldens, should answer the question of WHY do they want that particular breed? A lot of good breeders also seem to ask that question flat out.
I'm not looking for you to answer it, just commenting that everyone should do some "soul searching" as to their motives for getting any particular breed before they go ahead and get the puppy.
It is SERIOUS drool. Having had Pointers, I am not unfamiliar with drool... Pointer drool can take on a life of its own, too. Dave used to shake his head and end up looking like someone had wound white rope around his muzzle several times. And it would occasionally hit the walls. The windows at Pointer nose height always had what appeared to be a film of rubber sement on them. And once it hardened, it was the devil to remove. BUT, Pointer drool pales in comparison to Bloodhound drool. Bloodhound drool doesn't just fling, it spews. And I will say that I also find that even Saint Bernard drool is just a country cousin to Bloodhound drool!!

:eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,195 Posts
yes, that photo about sums it up. That must have been taken AFTER his mouth was wiped ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
I've had bassets for at least fifteen years and my husband has had them since he was a kid. I know that they're not the same, but the drool is close and so is the love to hear themselves howl, bark, etc. That I can live with, but awhile back I talked to a breeder and she was very plain about the bloodhound's activity level. She said they are not like the Beverly Hillbillies (I'm old) and she once found her bloodhound on the roof of her house. Her husband had left out the ladder after cleaning the gutters. She said they are curious, activity, and stubborn. Research and then talk to several breeders to get their opinion based on your lifestyle.
 

·
Griff's a Muffin Thief!
Joined
·
3,165 Posts
Directly from The American Bloodhound Club site:

A Bloodhound can be the world's most wonderful pet - IF. But it's a big if. Bloodhounds are gentle and loving - but big and bumbling. They can be high maintenance pets, because having a happy, well-behaved Bloodhound in your home requires lots of time and effort. A bloodhound may be the dog for you IF you have lots of time and patience. Bloodhounds can be stubborn, and training a Bloodhound requires tons of both. You can't just tell a bloodhound what to do, the way you can a spaniel. IF you don't mind the mess and slobber that come with a big, jowly dog that loves mud and rolling in things, the stinkier the better. IF you have a sense of humor as good as your Bloodhound's.
Puppies are a special challenge. A Bloodhound puppy requires a great deal of exercise; the only "good" puppy is a tired puppy. It will follow its nose into trouble again and again. Bloodhounds have been known to eat towels, batteries, remote controls, antique rockers, car seats, - every bloodhound owner can add to the list - and they often require expensive surgery after one of these tasting adventures. They can be fence jumpers, climbers, and diggers. They have to be walked on leash, and can pull as hard as a truck.
If you don't think life would be worth living without a Bloodhound, you probably qualify as a Bloodhound owner. If you're not convinced, you should think twice or three times
Excellent post and... isn't there bloodhound in the backgrounds way back of our Goldens? I do see some similar traits there. hehe!
 

·
...
Joined
·
16,000 Posts
I've had bassets for at least fifteen years and my husband has had them since he was a kid. I know that they're not the same, but the drool is close and so is the love to hear themselves howl, bark, etc. That I can live with, but awhile back I talked to a breeder and she was very plain about the bloodhound's activity level. She said they are not like the Beverly Hillbillies (I'm old) and she once found her bloodhound on the roof of her house. Her husband had left out the ladder after cleaning the gutters. She said they are curious, activity, and stubborn. Research and then talk to several breeders to get their opinion based on your lifestyle.
HAHAHAHAHA!!!!!! I still love The Beverly Hillbillies!!! (I'm old, too... )

Love the Bloodhound on the roof!!!!!

Let's not forget the Bumpuse's hounds in A Christmas Story...:eek:
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top