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Daisy - my heart
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Wow thank you for that - I have read it carefully and will have my hubby do the same! I am curious though, about Phase III - it says that "death is imminent" but in the treatment section it says that the dr. will remove part of the stomach and spleen, but then it also says that "it is no longer possible to save the dogs life" - Which is it? Can the dog be saved with surgery in this phase, or will the dog die no matter what?
There's phases within phases. Daisy was in early Phase 1, not the later Phase 1 where the stomach twists.

In the latter part of Phase III, there's nothing that can be done. When shock becomes irreversible, death is certain.

It doesn't take very long to go from Phase 1 to Phase III. Even if you only suspect bloat, you need to go to the vet immediately.
 

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I would say that Beau was a early phase 2 or very last phase 1. He had to have the surgery to untwist his stomach and the vet said it was in time to not cause any long lasting damage.

I have made this a sticky
 

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Thank you for posting this I hope everyone reads it.
Jo Ellen no way did you fail Daisy and you both certainly saved Jades life by posting about it.
Jade was led on her bed 10.30 at night when she got it (I thank god I hadn't gone to bed) The vet came and got her no way that I could get her there on my own thankfully they are only about half a mile down the road.
I think Jade was between phase 2 and 3 her surgery lasted about 3 1/2 hours and I was told to prepare myself for the worst.
Flipping heck I have palpitations even writing it.
 

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Dog Lover
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Snobear

Snobear was in whatever phase they have to do the surgery and we had the surgery where they sewed or tacked the stomach so it can never happen again.
Prior to surgery, vet said she MIGHT have to remove the spleen if there was damage, but there wasn't.

I just want to STRESS THE SIGNS I noticed prior to Snobear Bloating Friday Night.

Ancy-Anxiety
Pacing
Didn't want to lay or sit.
Wretching-trying to vomit over and over-nothing coming out.
Or trying to poop with nothing coming or both.
Distended stomach or Ken felt a lump in his stomach.
Won't/Can't eat or drink.
 

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I had never seen this chart before. Thanks for posting.

It makes me think that this is what happened to my last dog, Payton. He passed away on the way to the emergency vet. He had all the symptoms mentioned. We didn't have an autopsy done, but were told that his spleen ruptured. The emergency vet said that he most likely had an underlying condition such as a tumor. Would he have had similar symptoms? It was so out of nowhere. He was fine that night when he went to bed and then woke up in the middle of the night and deteriorated quickly. My sister still blames herself because she is positive that it was caused by a rawhide (very thin small piece) she gave him. I wish we had known more. I feel like I let him down.
Bloat would not be caused by a small rawhide, and if the rawhide somehow did cause an obstruction, it wouldn't have caused a ruptured spleen.

More likely is that your dog had hemangiosarcoma, a cancer of the blood vessel lining that often affects the spleen and causes a rupture. In that case, there is no treatment that could have saved the dog.
 

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As far as causes of bloat, it's usually because the stomach becomes too full and the contents can't be expelled. Air is the biggest culprit. Even in cases where drinking too much water triggered it, it's probably the air that got gulped with the water that's the problem.

Dogs have to be predisposed to develop it. There are some breeds that simply can't because of the way they're built. There's also a surgery they can do now where they tack the stomach in place, so if a dog is a repeated bloater, they can help prevent it in the future.

The most key sign is nonproductive vomiting. If a dog vomits more than a couple of times, and if nothing's coming up, head straight to the vet. If the dog is vomiting food or bile, a trip to the vet may be necessary if it's happing over and over, but it's not bloat if what's coming up has food or bile in it.
 

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Daisy - my heart
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Bloat (dilation), even by itself, is a very dangerous condition, it is an emergency. It can be fatal (though rare), even without the twist (torsion).

Also, bloat causes damage, though it's difficult to know the extent. It stretches the lining of the stomach and weakens the muscle fibers and can make recurrences more likely. Thankfully Daisy seems to be okay now though I am over the top careful with her water intake :p:

Honeysmum, I know, it's hard to go back there, it makes me physically ill still, even after a year. I wish more than anything that I could get some of the images of that weekend out of my memory.
 

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Missing Selka So Much
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Jo, it wasn't your fault. We can't know everything. In fact, look how many vets we hear about here on GRF that don't know everything!

I failed my Max and he had a vet who misdiagnosed him and I feel I should have realized and found a different vet sooner. It makes me sick thinking about it also.
And my Max died. Thank God Daisy is alive and with you today!

I have learned so much from being on GRF but we still don't know everything! I thank God every day that I took Gunner into be tested for hypothyroid just because I was paranoid and the vet saw the mass behind his eye!!! Otherwise I may not have taken him in till his yearly check! Who knows what may have happened.. he could easily have lost his eye.
 

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Jo Ellen,if you had failed her,she wouldn't be alive!.
Please don't torture yrself!.(((HUGS)))
This is a great chart!.
Does any one has articles on Heritary and bloat?
Would be interested,in finding out,more!.
 

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Missing Selka So Much
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Forgot to say, Thanks Betty!!!!! I have these symptoms memorized!

And even though most people think of overeating, drinking ,with exercise as causes of bloat so many times it seems to be linked with stress.
 

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Dog Lover
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Betty

Betty

Thanks for posting this. The MAIN THING with BLOAT when you see the pacing, the pale gums, the trying to vomit, any of these symptoms is to RUSH YOUR DOG TO A VET OR EMERGENCY VET IMMEDIATELY!
 

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& Golden Roxy And Roo To
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I know this post has been up for sometime and rightfully so. Question....is it true that the elevated dog bowls decrease the likelyhood of bloat? I know Ive read that somewhere over the years, figured Id ask now that I have a GR
Thanks in advance
 

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Love my Golden Boys!!
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I've read as well that elevated bowls decrease the risk of bloat as do slow-feed bowls......I lost my beautiful boy Phoenix to bloat last March....needless to say, I am extremely paranoid and do whatever is necessary to ensure it doesn't occur again.

ETA: We use slow feed but not elevated bowls.
 

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& Sawyer's & Quinn's too!
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Daisy - my heart
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Daisy had minor surgery this morning (ear hematoma). I'm so scared of the water when I bring her home. I'm giving her only 1/2 cup every 1/2 hour, and I won't be breathing :eek:

I'm not at all concerned about food or raised or unraised dishes ... it's the water that terrifies me.
 

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Love my Golden Boys!!
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Daisy had minor surgery this morning (ear hematoma). I'm so scared of the water when I bring her home. I'm giving her only 1/2 cup every 1/2 hour, and I won't be breathing :eek:

I'm not at all concerned about food or raised or unraised dishes ... it's the water that terrifies me.
You and me both......I cringe when my guys drink after meals. I tend to take it away from them if I see them drinking too much.
 

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& Golden Roxy And Roo To
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Ohhhh boy .... nix the elevated bowls. Which, as I think more about this, makes sense. In humans many people think that when they are taking pills, if they throw their heads back the pills go down easier. When in fact a slight chin tuck while swallowing opens the way for easier swallowing. If you apply that to canines swallowing and worrying about excess air than yes, no elevated bowls.
Geeze, if Id just think!!!!! Than again, these post help me do just that.
 
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