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Duke & Nala's Mom 🐾
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Hi - I just stumbled upon your pix of your adorable pup and notice your Nala looks remarkably like our Layla, who we rescued 2.5 years ago at 9 months. We only can speculate as to her mix -- retriever, lab, Newfie, flat coat? Regardless of her ancestry, what won our hearts was her exuberance and her "love everyone" nature and her overall disposition that reminded us of a Golden. What a love. Good luck with your sweet new family member!:)
Layla is gorgeous! :heartbeat

She looks exactly like Nala as of right now, who is 14 weeks old now. She may just be a Black Lab and Golden Mix like Nala, but with a Lab coat! What a cutie! Is Layla a people or dog person more? I've found that Nala loves people more than other dogs.

Here is a picture of Nala at 14 weeks old.
 

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Actually that is not true. Black can happen if there is a defect or mutation, so while it's a one in a million shot, it can happen.
Learn something new every day. :). I knew they could have black on their coats, but didn't know they could be entirely black. Interesting...
 

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Awww! So cute! I have to say our Layla is quite the people pup and loves all humans. We still have a hard time keeping her from jumping on people to get in their lap. She doesn't know her strength. She loves everyone who comes to our house ...Although she can be territorial of her family pack. She is a good watch dog. She plays with other dogs well, is high energy, but if another dog is present she has no recall. We don't exist. She ignores us and usually chases the dog that's chasing the ball. She tends to not take social cues, such as when to leave a dog alone that just wants to play fetch with his own human. She doesn't like skateboarders or hipster guys with hats and beards, (shows she has a good common sense ?).
We don't know much about her history other than she was at the Humane Society with litter mates and adopted out but later returned at 9 months. We adopted her July 5th 2014. I'm hoping we can rescue or adopt a Golden to join our pack soon to be a playmate as doggie daycare is killing us! ???

Here's a picture of our 14 year old lab mix who is now deaf and blind (eyes had horrible glaucoma so we had to eventually remove them).
 

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What are their life spans? I have heard that they don't live long. :-( I rescued my flattie from the pound. She is a wonderful, energetic, loving dog! She loves to be petted. She's a little needy. She was abandoned and in the shelter for weeks. She was scheduled to be euthanized the next day. I got her out of the shelter just in time! I love my Sheba so much!
 

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Hi and welcome to the board. Flat coated retrievers have a shorter lifespan of 8 to 10 years, while golden retrievers live to between 10 and 12. They're both magnificent dogs.
 

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It's interesting how the genetics play out, isn't it? My 1/2 Golden 1/2 Labrador Retriever, Bagheera, is quite a bit different from Nala. At age 5 months, he shows very little feathering and is often mistaken for a purebred black Lab. He's definitely on the puny side of the ledger, and as Labs are just a bit smaller than Goldens, this reinforces his Lab half being more dominant. His eyes though, are very Golden, not in color so much as his expressive use of them. He knows how to make cute eyes. I'm not sure which side his cold tolerance falls on. He loves to go out in the snow and just sit there and watch the leaves, the birds, the rabbits and squirrels. He almost never asks to come back in, and I have to call him.

His personality is all over the board. Sometimes he's a Golden and wants to be with you, sometimes he has that Lab aloofness that says go away, I'm doing fine here. He's certainly not a velcro dog. One of the more interesting developments is that he loves everyone in the family, goes up and greets each one with tail awag. My Golden, Fenris, was a one-man dog. He was my shadow. Bagheera has 4 people he'll happily interact with. I have to tamp down feelings of loss when I see that. I tell myself that I don't "need" to be worshiped by a dog, and that's true, but man, Fenris made me feel adored. Bagheera is turning out to be more of a good friend than devoted companion. I am adjusting. :)
 

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Megora, I totally agree. Cross breeds are much more common. It seems the genetics from a black lab makes them black, while the hair length is determined by the golden retriever. But well-bred flatcoats have a different face, which is unlike labs or goldens. I always wanted to own one.
 

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Actually, it is not possible even in the 1 in a million numbers for a pure bred Golden to be totally black. Goldens are genetically black but in the recessive form, which makes yellow coat color. You can get black spot phenomenon which could have fairly large black spots, but those are from a somatic mutation where a cell mutates from the recessive yellow to the dominant coat color which is black but NO Golden Retriever has the dominant allele or they themselves would be black since it is dominant. The mutation that causes spotting is something that happens during development. But a totally black dog would require an actual allele being dominant- which is something that is heritable since all dogs inherit one allele from each parent of each pair.
Anney Doucette (forum member) wrote a really understandable article on this for the GRN. You might try to locate it.
 

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Megora, I totally agree. Cross breeds are much more common. It seems the genetics from a black lab makes them black, while the hair length is determined by the golden retriever. But well-bred flatcoats have a different face, which is unlike labs or goldens. I always wanted to own one.
Well, because black is dominant, a black Labrador male can also carry the recessive brown or yellow genes. So, such a black Lab male, bred to a golden, would likely produce some black as well as golden pups. Case in point, my Bagheera was created from a black Lab father and a normal golden retriever mother. Out of 13 pups, only 2 were black.
 

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"Well, because black is dominant, a black Labrador male can also carry the recessive brown or yellow genes. So, such a black Lab male, bred to a golden, would likely produce some black as well as golden pups. Case in point, my Bagheera was created from a black Lab father and a normal golden retriever mother. Out of 13 pups, only 2 were black."

In my understanding it doesn't matter whether black is dominant. It is the "e" loci that determines the color of a golden retriever. For a golden retriever to be any shade of gold they must have a double recessive "ee". All purebred goldens have the ee. The black labrador had to have at least one recessive e. His e loci would look like this "Ee". When mating with the golden for 11 of those 13 pups he gave the recessive "e" . This means that 11 of the pups got a recessive e from both parents. "ee", This is why they are gold. The two black pups got a recessive "e" from mom and a dominant "E" from the Labrador making them a "Ee".

The "B" locus comes into play when you are dealing with purebred labradors.

Coat Colour Genetics in Retrievers

All Golden Retrievers are ee.

All Yellow Labrador Retrievers are ee.
 
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