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Hi, my pup is almost 12 weeks old and the last two weeks have been a nightmare with him biting us.

He'll wake up from a nap and when he's come round he'll start to chew and bite and pull at our clothes. My husband and I are covered in bite and scratch marks from his - some of mine are really bad. I'm really concerned as I have a young son too and my husband and I have both said that if he bites our son, he will have to go......

He growls at us and the more we tell him "no" the more he does it. We've tried the straight "no" bit, smacking, holding him down on the floor and saying "no", distracting him with other things...... but he still comes back to bite until he's had enough!

I wonder if anyone else has gone through this. What with this and the pooing and weeing in the house still, we are at our wits end. He just doesn't seem to learn anything.

Can anyone suggest anything please??? I would be so grateful. Thanks! x
 

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one thing that we used with Pumba that i actually learned when i got a ferret, was they told us instead of smacking their mouth for biting, was to stick your finger in their mouth each time they do it, it was a little different with a dog, as obviously their mouths are much bigger, but what my boyfriend does when he's playing with her and she gets a little too bite crazy, is he'll put his wrist in her mouth. although pumba has never bitten aggressively, only carried away playfulness, it may help a bit for your guy.
 

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hello! Im going through something similar with our pup. Although he is much younger than your dog (9 weeks). ALL he wants to do is bite, very hard, on all of us. I have a 3 year old so its been tough trying to make sure he stays away from my son and doesnt bite him.He will be the sweetest, calmest puppy and then like a light switch went on, he will turn spastic and try and attack everyone in the house! I Know he is just playing but it does get out of hand sometimes and its a headache keeping it in control. One thing that we have started doing that seems to be working a little bit is yelping like a dog would yelp when he bites too hard and then ignoring him for a bit. When we let out a loud, sudden, high pitched yelp, it startles him and he will stop biting long enough for us to pull our hands or clothes away and then turn around and ignore him. It still hasnt stopped him from doing it but when he DOES do it, it seems to curb his behavior a bit. Im sorry your having a tough time! Maybe you could try a dog obedience class? I hope things improve for you!
 

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Hi, my pup is almost 12 weeks old and the last two weeks have been a nightmare with him biting us.

He'll wake up from a nap and when he's come round he'll start to chew and bite and pull at our clothes. My husband and I are covered in bite and scratch marks from his - some of mine are really bad. I'm really concerned as I have a young son too and my husband and I have both said that if he bites our son, he will have to go......

He growls at us and the more we tell him "no" the more he does it. We've tried the straight "no" bit, smacking, holding him down on the floor and saying "no", distracting him with other things...... but he still comes back to bite until he's had enough!

I wonder if anyone else has gone through this. What with this and the pooing and weeing in the house still, we are at our wits end. He just doesn't seem to learn anything.

Can anyone suggest anything please??? I would be so grateful. Thanks! x
If there's one thing I've learned from this forum, it's that you don't have an aggressive puppy, you have a normal puppy. My first post here was pretty much like this, and what I was told is that it's all about persistent correction and positive reinforcement. Some suggestions would be what the above poster stated and yelp/ignore your puppy when he bites. Another would be to replace your hand with a toy and praise him when he chews on appropriate things. Other people use methods like bitter apple spray on their hands. I'm sure as other people respond you'll get more suggestions.

For me, I tried several different methods, and we're getting there. Ace still bites, but certainly far less and far more gently than he did early on, and he does stop when I say no or off (mostly, haha). As long as you're persistent in correcting him, it will get better as he gets older.

As for ensuring your child stays safe, you're going to constantly have to monitor play when they're in the room together until your puppy learns. My 5 year old niece loves Ace, but she's not allowed to play with him alone, because he's still too rough with her, and she's too rough with him. It's for the safety of both of them, really. That said, whenever I do training with basic commands with Ace, I typically have my niece practice with him too, and he does listen to her commands now. I've found that since I've been doing this with them, he respects her more and is slightly gentler.
 

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Ouch - those puppy teeth are so sharp!

It's time for a basic puppy obedience class. Give your little guy some positive reinforcement for sitting, down, etc. and you won't have to keep saying "NO"!

A few months from now will make a huge difference.
 

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What your puppy is doing is very normal and can be stopped pretty quickly if everyone in the house is on board. I just outlined one way to do it for someone else, so rather than retype it, please check out this thread:
http://www.goldenretrieverforum.com...py-aggressively-bites-everyone-except-me.html

I'm not a trainer by any means, but there are some really good books available at the library on how to teach bite inhibition. The books will also explain housetraining, etc.

Good luck, and keep asking questions on this forum. I've learned a lot from reading the replies to people's issues.
 

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We are about 6 weeks ahead of you in Peyton's puppy age and 6 weeks ago were in your shoes.

He growls at us and the more we tell him "no" the more he does it. We've tried the straight "no" bit, smacking, holding him down on the floor and saying "no", distracting him with other things...... but he still comes back to bite until he's had enough!

Negative corrections (smacking, holding down) will not work and probably make worse. If "no bite" and distractions will not work, it's time for a 10 minute timeout in the crate. It's amazing what this will do for puppy attitude.

What with this and the pooing and weeing in the house still, we are at our wits end.

You said you have a young son which probably takes a lot of your time. How often are you letting the puppy out? The first 2 months at home, Peyton went outside every 20-30 minutes and we had less than a handful of accidents in the house. It's a lot of work but that's part of owning a puppy. Just last night I walked outside for 20 minutes until Peyton finally pooped...and was rewarded with a full nights sleep :)
 

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Puppy biting, while frustrating, is NOT aggression. Much like a human baby touches everything, a puppy uses his mouth to interact with the world since that is how he got to know his littermates. Even though it hurts your arms, the puppy sometimes means to engage you, to play, to burn off energy etc but he hasnt learned to "speak human" yet. Gives the pup a little peanut butter on a metal spoon. He won't want to clatter his teeth, so he will gentle his mouth. You can teach him the word "Gentle" or "Easy". Have the kids freeze like in freeze tag if the pup is too wild, and then tether or crate him calmly. When the puppy bites, have a toy handy for an alternative behavior- not bite, this is YOUR toy. Also teach the "Find It game" in which the pup goes out for a tossed treat, you call his name, and he then gets a second treat for coming back to you. Once he knows the game, the kids can simply toss out a treat if he is bitey, and engage in the productive game until he settles.
 
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Smacking and pinning your puppy is highly counterproductive and will have negative out comes. It is detrimental to your relationship development and often pinning a puppy will result in further frustrating you pup, therefore increasing the biting. I can empathizes and understand your frustration and anger concerning the biting and other puppy issue, but please remember he is only a baby and this is normal puppy behavior. Gosh those land sharks do hurt though!

If your puppy does not seem to be learning anything, it is because he is so young and does not understand what you are trying to communicate. When your son was little I am sure he scratched and bite you and your husband, because he didn't understand that it hurt and was wrong and thing how long it took your beautiful son to become toilet trained and he could understand what you were saying!

Also remember that for the first couple of months your puppy was surrounded by his brother and sisters and spent all day everyday learning to bite and chew on each other. To your puppy biting is learnt ingrained behavior and nothing more than fun play (with no harm intended). It is going to take time, patience and consistency to develop and mold your pup in the wonderful family member you deserve, but don't worry all the hard work is worth every minute of it to have that special treasured family member and best friend for you young son to grow up with.

I am of the belief that all behavior has a reason or desired outcome. Your puppy has certain needs that he needs fulfilled and when they are not he behaves in a manner that fulfills these needs, for example you pup is not getting enough attention or he is bored he bite to gain attention and engage play to stop boredom. You need to analysis the behavior and cues and work out why your puppy is displaying this behaviour.

I am not going to bore you with outlining the process for biting or toilet training, because I feel you will learn a wealth of knowledge by doing a few searches, plus my post is already huge! So at the top of the page just below the brown banner you will see a search box titled google custom search.

The searches I advise are:
- Land shark
- Biting
- Toilet training
- Clicker training
- Positive reinforcement training
- Puppy classes

Do you have your puppy enrolled in some puppy classes and future training classes. Also if you are really struggling please seek the assistance of a professional, but really your puppy is just a baby and is displaying normal behavior. This stage is overwhelming for the most experienced, so don't feel bad about any of your troubles your at the right place to get help!!

If my search ideas are not of help, please sing out and I am happy to be more specific action plans to ensure success for your family. Remember exercise is your best friend!!! Not just physical exercise, mental exercise through training or kong wobblers, treat balls, puzzles etc.

Also please please ensure you are controlling and supervising all contact between your son and the puppy. Your pup doesn't know better, so he will bite your son (he will learn though), so please don't be to quick to give your puppy the boot if there is an accident. Also explain the rules you wish to have in place with your son, its very important he understands the boundary's for himself and the puppy.

Good luck and I hope I have been of help.
 

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Hi, my pup is almost 12 weeks old and the last two weeks have been a nightmare with him biting us.

He'll wake up from a nap and when he's come round he'll start to chew and bite and pull at our clothes. My husband and I are covered in bite and scratch marks from his - some of mine are really bad. I'm really concerned as I have a young son too and my husband and I have both said that if he bites our son, he will have to go......

He growls at us and the more we tell him "no" the more he does it. We've tried the straight "no" bit, smacking, holding him down on the floor and saying "no", distracting him with other things...... but he still comes back to bite until he's had enough!

I wonder if anyone else has gone through this. What with this and the pooing and weeing in the house still, we are at our wits end. He just doesn't seem to learn anything.

Can anyone suggest anything please??? I would be so grateful. Thanks! x
Your pup's behaviour is not aggression - as others have already said it is perfectly normal puppy behaviour. I notice you live in Nottinghamshire (probably not all that far away from me) and I hope you don't mind if I send you a private message.
 

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Hi, my pup is almost 12 weeks old and the last two weeks have been a nightmare with him biting us.

He'll wake up from a nap and when he's come round he'll start to chew and bite and pull at our clothes. My husband and I are covered in bite and scratch marks from his - some of mine are really bad. I'm really concerned as I have a young son too and my husband and I have both said that if he bites our son, he will have to go......

He growls at us and the more we tell him "no" the more he does it. We've tried the straight "no" bit, smacking, holding him down on the floor and saying "no", distracting him with other things...... but he still comes back to bite until he's had enough!

I wonder if anyone else has gone through this. What with this and the pooing and weeing in the house still, we are at our wits end. He just doesn't seem to learn anything.

Can anyone suggest anything please??? I would be so grateful. Thanks! x
I see you are new to the GRF and I'm guessing new to Golden puppies. The behaviors your are describing are TOTALLY NORMAL for puppies that age. Golden puppies are notoriously mouthy but will outgrow it with time.
When my Maggie (RIP) was a puppy it seemed like all our clothes had holes from the knees down. I would greet people saying "I have a new puppy (while showing my scratched hands), can you tell?" Hank wasn't as bad but we still had plenty of scratches to show.

12 weeks is still to young to expect a puppy to be housebroke. They usually will "get it" about now though and start letting you know when they want out. You still have to be on your toes watching for signs and taking them out often. Praise and a treat every time he 'goes' in the appropriate spot.

Smacking and holding them down won't get you anywhere. Puppy isn't being "bad", these are behaviors he will need to outgrow. Nipping is how they play and will learn with age, patience and training that it isn't acceptable with his human family. Goldens are bred to use their mouth (for retrieving) so it comes more natural than with other breeds. Something people need to consider when choosing the breed.

You say if he bites your son he has to go, well, I can pretty well guarantee that at some point your son will get scratched or nipped with those puppy teeth. It's all part of having a puppy. My granddaughter was 4 y.o. (she lives here) and survived Hank's puppyhood! They are the best of pals now and she can do anything to him.
 
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I'll just second what has already been said. And add to that, 12 weeks old is just an INFANT, it is way too young to expect the puppy to be housetrained, or consistently "learn" anything.
 

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You have recieved a ton of great advice but no where did I see anyone asking what and how much exercise does your pup get a day. Pups have tons of energy and need a way to release it if you are doing any training yet I think now would be time to start. You work on basic obedience and you can start teaching him to retrieve. I find a tired puppy is a happy family.
 

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You have recieved a ton of great advice but no where did I see anyone asking what and how much exercise does your pup get a day. Pups have tons of energy and need a way to release it if you are doing any training yet I think now would be time to start. You work on basic obedience and you can start teaching him to retrieve. I find a tired puppy is a happy family.
I couldn't agree with this more.... what kind of exercise schedule is your puppy on? How often does he get a walk and how much time is he spending alone in his crate?? I often found with my previous golden that just including him as much as possible in our family routine helped wear him out... he ran errands in the car with me, took the kids to school or went with me to the bus stop, we took walks in our town Main street area and met new people outside the library so he could sit for treats from strangers. Anything to keep him from being asleep in his crate during the day is helpful.

Please sign up for puppy kindergarten with a local dog training club ASAP if you haven't already done so. Best thing you can do for your pup and your family!
 

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I'll just second what has already been said. And add to that, 12 weeks old is just an INFANT, it is way too young to expect the puppy to be housetrained, or consistently "learn" anything.
Sorry but you can not compare a human infant with a puppy. They are worlds apart in capabilities and needs and to humanize a dog is a mistake and runs the risk of misunderstanding their needs. Puppies are not INFANTS they are puppies with a voracious capability to learn. At 12 weeks old a puppy in the wild will be learning survival and starting to take first steps towards independence from it's dam. Their primary motivator is to fit in with their pack successfully, their very survival depends on it. Human infants have no such motivation being entirely dependent on their mother.

Puppies between 8weeks and 4 months are at their absolute learning best and will pick up behaviours both good and bad extremely quickly. It is our responsibility to ensure during this period that they learn the behaviours to successfully fit in with living in a human environment.

I hope you do not take this as a criticism, I feel I have to post this as this point is so very fundamental to a puppies well being. Puppies are not infants.
 

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Sorry but you can not compare a human infant with a puppy. They are worlds apart in capabilities and needs and to humanize a dog is a mistake and runs the risk of misunderstanding their needs. Puppies are not INFANTS they are puppies with a voracious capability to learn. At 12 weeks old a puppy in the wild will be learning survival and starting to take first steps towards independence from it's dam. Their primary motivator is to fit in with their pack successfully, their very survival depends on it. Human infants have no such motivation being entirely dependent on their mother.

Puppies between 8weeks and 4 months are at their absolute learning best and will pick up behaviours both good and bad extremely quickly. It is our responsibility to ensure during this period that they learn the behaviours to successfully fit in with living in a human environment.

I hope you do not take this as a criticism, I feel I have to post this as this point is so very fundamental to a puppies well being. Puppies are not infants.
I never said human, and am in no way comparing puppies to human babies. An 8 week to 4 month old puppy is an infant in comparison to a 6 month old, 8 month or 9 month old puppy.
 

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one thing that we used with Pumba that i actually learned when i got a ferret, was they told us instead of smacking their mouth for biting, was to stick your finger in their mouth each time they do it, it was a little different with a dog, as obviously their mouths are much bigger, but what my boyfriend does when he's playing with her and she gets a little too bite crazy, is he'll put his wrist in her mouth. although pumba has never bitten aggressively, only carried away playfulness, it may help a bit for your guy.
You puppy is normal... they are called "land sharks" for a reason. :)

I found this post interesting. Although I never used it on our dogs the appropriate response for a person biting you (or themselves) is to "feed the bite." As is in, push in, don't pull out as the typical reaction would be. Pulling out allows someone (or I guess a dog) to tighten their grip and can cause more damage. Pushing in causing the person (or again, I guess a dog) to open their mouth allowing you to pull out without further damage.

It's uncomfortable but it doesn't hurt (try it on yourself, lol). I do put my hands in our dogs mouths when they don't release a toy on command.

Again, I've never used the "feed the bite" method on a dog, but you may be onto something. I look forward to what others have to say.

As an aside, no my fiancé doesn't bite me. :) I work in the field of special education and have encountered many children that will bite others or themselves... this is where my advice comes from. The "feed the bite" method is considered best practice at it quickly ends the bite, which is especially important when someone is biting themselves. Again, I've never used it on dogs, just thought the quoted post was interesting.

I promise it doesn't hurt on people (I tried it myself when I first learned of it), but it is awkward enough to stop the bite.
 

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I never said human, and am in no way comparing puppies to human babies. An 8 week to 4 month old puppy is an infant in comparison to a 6 month old, 8 month or 9 month old puppy.
The comparison is made with the term 'infant' which literally refers to a human baby which can not yet speak (latin: infans). A puppy is a young dog nothing more nothing less.

I really do not wish to offend you, however you made a human comparison whether intended or not. You are clearly a valued and helpful member of these boards and please do not take this personally, it is just I see these human comparisons with both puppies and adult dogs far too frequently which can cause misrepresentation.
 

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As I said, I am in no way comparing puppies to human babies. When we are trying to help new puppy owners who are just learning about puppies, I'm trying to convey to them they are dealing with a baby that either mentally or physically is not mature enough to do things an adult dog can do. The word infant applies.
 
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