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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It is getting close to the day I will get to bring my male golden puppy home. I can't wait! I have read dog training books from our local library, a lot of them were outdated, but contained some useful information. I am wondering what books you would personally recommend as "must haves" for a golden retriever owner? I plan on trying to get him registered as a therapy dog when he gets older. Any books out there that can help me begin training for that while he is a puppy? His father is a registered therapy dog and his mother seemed very laid back and gentle when we met her, so we are hoping that our puppy will have similar traits.
 

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I think the name is "How to Raise a Puppy You Can Live With" i found it to be a good general , cover the basics, kind of book. It's not the best, but I thought is was rather good.
 

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I like Puppy's First Steps: The Whole-Dog Approach to Raising a Happy, Healthy, Well-Behaved Puppy
by Faculty of the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts Univer (Author), Nicholas Dodman (Editor)
 

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Mom to Fyodor & Gibson
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Books and videos by Ian Dunbar are all excellent.

"My smart puppy" by Brian Kilcommons and Sarah Wilson is also very good.
 

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Where The Bitches Rule
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I would recommend Ian Dunbar's How To Teach A New Dog Old Tricks to start actual training.
The book suggested by Tuckerpupp, How To Raise a Pup You Can Live With, is good for dealing with puppy issues. I send a copy home with all my new puppy families.
 

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I still really like (and I'm not sure you'll hear a lot of seconds for this) The Art of Raising a Puppy by the Monks of New Skete. They raise German Shepherds, so some of the techniques are too harsh for the average Golden. Still, they have great info on the puppy developmental stages and some great tips for avoiding or minimizing typical puppy problems. So many of the questions asked on these forums (coprophagia, chewing, separation anxiety, guarding, etc.) are answered really well.

If you use this book, just make sure you understand that your Golden will need consistency but not harshness; most Goldens need firm, positive training, and very little correction.
 

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Where The Bitches Rule
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I for one think that the Monks of New Skete fall into the outdated category, especially when it comes to Goldens.
Ian Dundar's book will get you to where you want to be but a much happier road for you and your pup.
Here is what another well respected dog behaviorist had to say about Dunbar's book

"How To Teach A New Dog Old Tricks is the best book by dog training’s leading genius. The most relevant, important piece ever written on the subject of dog behavior and training. Some fields are lucky enough to be granted a giant: a figure whose contributions inspire awe and are unsurpassable. Ian Dunbar is that in dog behavior. There is no single person on the face of the planet to whom dog trainers and owners (not to mention dogs) owe more." Jean Donaldson (author of The Culture Clash)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the replies!

Thank you all for the quick replies! I just went online and bought a used copy of "How To Teach A New Dog Old Tricks". It seemed like it had a lot of good reviews.
 

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I have 4 mastiffs and 2 terriers. I am also an active dog trainer. I have worked with several breeds of dogs that all train on different levels. As it may be assumed that bully breeds are harder to train, its just not true. All dogs have brains and need training to their specific situations. It is that simple.

Quick thought on house training:
Dogs that are not house broken should not be on teir own in the home. They should not roam free and that is the owners responsibility. Your dog should be a general down stay position where he or she cant use the bathroom. Tell me the last time you saw a dog laying down use the bathroom. Learn their/ create their outside bathroom schedule. Know the basic times and when that time is approaching you make sure you have that dog at your side! Positive reinforcement is a great thing after they handle their business outside. A simple bathroom command should be enforced(hurry up), after they make you praise and return to the home.
NEVER PUT THEIR FACE IN IT AND SCREAM AT THEM!


http://www.goldenretrieverforum.com/showthread.php?p=706529#post706529
 

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Definitely Premier's "Ultimate Puppy Toolkit"
 

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Another quick thought on housetraining, and I've seen this one done wrong more times than I can tell you...
the proper time to reward the puppy is RIGHT after they go potty! NOT when they get back in the house. So many owners send the puppy out, and then when they come back in the puppy gets a treat. This teaches the pup that they get a treat for coming in, not for going potty, and you end up with the dog that keeps asking to go out/come in go out/come in, in order to get treats. They missed the basic concept...


Quick thought on house training:
Dogs that are not house broken should not be on teir own in the home. They should not roam free and that is the owners responsibility. Your dog should be a general down stay position where he or she cant use the bathroom. Tell me the last time you saw a dog laying down use the bathroom. Learn their/ create their outside bathroom schedule. Know the basic times and when that time is approaching you make sure you have that dog at your side! Positive reinforcement is a great thing after they handle their business outside. A simple bathroom command should be enforced(hurry up), after they make you praise and return to the home.
NEVER PUT THEIR FACE IN IT AND SCREAM AT THEM!


http://www.goldenretrieverforum.com/showthread.php?p=706529#post706529
 
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Pat Miller's The Power of Positve Dog Training is at the top of my list. I was into "old school" obedience training with my wonderful past doggies. Then came Maggie Rose and a training center that promotes totally positve training. We are totally hooked.
 

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I really liked the K.I.S.S. Guide to Raising a Puppy. I dont know who wrote it but it was a good general book. I also have several others, but they're on my bookshelf at home.

If you're looking for things to do with therapy work, basically your puppy should be well socialized and have manners. Many therapy dog organizations use a modified CGC (or CGN in Canada) program. Both my girls are therapy dogs with St. John Ambulance. Teach your puppy to take treats from your hand gently, to walk on a leash without having to be held back (through crowds), things like that. I took my girls to a shopping mall and walked around them with empty shopping carts (and clanged them to make loud noises). Your puppy shouldn't be overly sensitive to loud or scary things, but it shouldn't be pushy or overly confident either (you can change behaviour, but you cant change temperment... they're born with it).

Hopefully that gives you some ideas. BJ
 
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Taking Care of Puppy Business by Gail Pivar is a good one.
 

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The Other End of the Leash
 
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